366 days of gratitude

September 30, 2016

When cooking at home I take for granted a lot of the tools I use.

The grater, for example.

I use it several times a week, mainly for cheese but also for carrots, sometimes other vegetables and less frequently for things like chocolate or the rind of citrus fruit.

While grating cheese for a soufle today I wondered who had invented it.

Google provided the answer.

Today I’m grateful for François Boullier who invented the grater in the 1540s.

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Rural round-up

September 30, 2016

Pasture to plate approach for DCANZ regulatory manager Dianne Schumacher – Sue O’Dowd:

A Taranaki microbiologist skilled in the development of regulatory strategies for the New Zealand dairy industry brings a perceptive pasture-to-plate approach to her work.

Dianne Schumacher, who owns a 62-hectare dairy farm milking 110 cows near Stratford with husband Chris, joined the Dairy Companies Association of New Zealand (DCANZ) as regulatory manager in January this year. 

She brings to the role broad international and national food safety expertise gathered during her 30-year career in the dairy industry. . . 

The short-term or long-term game – Rick Powdrell:

With hotly contested demand for stock, farmers and meat processors need to think carefully about their existing strategy and what it means for our industry in the long-term.

Rural New Zealand has been through a challenging climate in recent years, with many farmers still enduring the ‘fallout’ and adjusting their farm policies going forward as they look to return to normal.

Whether you have been through severe drought or de-stocked as a result of last season’s perceived strong El Nino you will be looking to re-stock to more normal numbers. . . 

NZ wins from trade deals –  Mike Chapman:

The question many people are asking is, ‘which trade deal will it be: the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPPA) or the Regional Economic Partnership (RCEP)?’

So much focus has been on the TPPA it is very likely few people in New Zealand know anything about RCEP. The main difference is that the TPPA has the US as one of the partner nations, but not China; while, the RCEP has China as one of the partner nations, but not the US. Neither the US nor China is in both the TPPA and RCEP. For many nations, preferential access to both the US and China is a major goal.

The Peterson Institute assessment is the TPPA will increase annual real incomes in NZ by $US6 billion – 2.2% of our gross domestic product. It will increase our annual exports by $US9b –10.2% of our exports over baseline projections by 2030. This is because the TPPA will eliminate 75% of tariffs when it comes into force and 99% of tariffs when it is fully in force. For horticulture there are real trade benefits totalling around $26m per annum directly due to reduced tariffs. . . 

Time to review your calving date? – Wilma Foster:

With calving almost over and mating on the horizon it’s time to have a review of one of the most significant decisions you will make for next season, calving date.

There are four significant decisions you make on farm every year. They are calving date, stocking rate, BCS at calving and pasture cover at calving.

Historically calving dates were 10-14 days later than what we currently calve.

This has been due to a desire to increase days in milk, farmers mating rising 2-year heifers earlier than the main herd to improve their incalf rates, and the use of bulls with a shorter gestation. . . 

Beetle pest deterred by mussel shell mulch:

Research to find natural ways of reducing insect pest damage in vineyards was highlighted at the 2016 Romeo Bragato Conference – the largest conference for wine growers and makers in New Zealand.

Mauricio González-Chang, a Lincoln University PhD student in the Bio-Protection Research Centre, presented evidence that mineral feeding deterrents and mussel shell mulch can protect vines from grass grub beetle attack.  

Mauricio’s study of vines in the Awatere Valley in Marlborough, found that natural silica-containing feeding deterrents, such as kaolin particles (hydrophobic particle films) and diatomaceous earth, reduced the damage caused by beetles by about a third in chardonnay, and a half in pinot noir grape varieties.  

While the silica results were promising, the greatest reduction in damage was seen when crushed mussel shells were spread under the vine rows. The shells affected landing behaviour of the beetles and resulted in a two-thirds reduction in feeding damage. .  .

Bring your ag innovations to the table :

Innovative food and agribusiness start-ups and fledgling ventures will have the opportunity to showcase themselves to potential investors in Sydney in November.

FoodBytes! Sydney will be staged as part of the international Farm2Fork Summit, focusing on future innovation in food and agriculture, to be held on Thursday, November 3.

Originally launched in the United States in 2015, FoodBytes! is designed to find the most innovative concepts in food and agriculture and pair that creativity with the capital needed to bring them to market. . . 

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I am a farmer. I solve problems you don’t know you have in ways you can’t understand.


Friday’s answers

September 30, 2016

Andrei  and Teletext get my thanks for posing the questions and will win a virtual batch of tan square by leaving the answers below should they have stumped everyone.


Quote of the day

September 30, 2016

However much I might try to expound or explain Love, when I come to Love itself, I am ashamed of my explanations… Love alone can explain the mysteries of love and lovers.  – Rumi who was born on this day in 1207.


September 30 in history

September 30, 2016

1207 – Rumi, Persian mystic and poet, was born (d. 1273).

1399  Henry IV was proclaimed King of England.

1744  France and Spain defeated the Kingdom of Sardinia at the Battle of Madonna dell’Olmo.

1791  The Magic Flute, the last opera composed by Mozart, premiered at Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden in Vienna.

1791  The National Constituent Assembly in Paris was dissolved; Parisians hailed Maximilien Robespierre and Jérôme Pétion as incorruptible patriots.

1813  Battle of Bárbula: Simón Bolívar defeated Santiago Bobadilla.

1832 Ann Maria Reeves Jarvis, American labour activist, was born (d. 1905).

1860 Britain’s first tram service begins in Birkenhead, Merseyside.

1861 – William Wrigley, Jr., American businessman, founded Wrigley Company, was born (d. 1932).

1878 – The ‘Great Flood’ of 1878 killed at least three people and thousands of animals as it swept across the southern South Island.
Great Flood hits South Island
1882  The world’s first commercial hydroelectric power plant (later known as Appleton Edison Light Company) began operation on the Fox River in Appleton, Wisconsin.

1888  Jack the Ripper killed his third and fourth victims, Elizabeth Strideand Catherine Eddowes.

1895  Madagascar became a French protectorate.

1901 Hubert Cecil Booth patented the vacuum cleaner.

1903  The new Gresham’s School was officially opened by Field Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood.

1904 – Waldo Williams, Welsh poet and academic, was born (d. 1971).

1906  The Real Academia Galega, Galician language’s biggest linguistic authority, started working in Havana.

1921 Scottish actress Deborah Kerr was born (d 2007).

1924 US author Truman Capote was born (d. 1984).

1927  Babe Ruth became the first baseball player to hit 60 home runs in a season.

1931  Start of “Die Voortrekkers” youth movement for Afrikaners in Bloemfontein.

1932 – Anthony Hawkins, English-Australian actor, was born (d. 2013).

1933 – Barbara Knox, English actress, was born.

1935  The Hoover Dam, was dedicated.

1935 US singer Johnny Mathis was born.

1938  Britain, France, Germany and Italy signed the Munich Agreement, allowing Germany to occupy the Sudetenland region of Czechoslovakia.

1938  The League of Nations unanimously outlawed “intentional bombings of civilian populations”.

1939  General Władysław Sikorski became commander-in-chief of the Polish Government in exile.

1943 Marilyn McCoo, American singer (The 5th Dimension), was born.

1943 Ian Ogilvy, British Actor, was born.

1945  The Bourne End rail crash, in Hertfordshire killed 43 people.

1949  The Berlin Airlift ended.

1951 – Barry Marshall, Australian physician and academic, Nobel Prize laureate, was born.

1954  The U.S. Navy submarine USS Nautilus was commissioned as the world’s first nuclear reactor powered vessel.

1955  Film icon James Dean died in a road accident aged 24.

1957 US actress Fran Drescher was born.

1962 Sir Guy Powles became New Zealand’s first Ombudsman.

Government watchdog appointed

1962  Mexican-American labour leader César Chávez founded the United Farm Workers.

1962  James Meredith entered the University of Mississippi, defying segregation.

1965  General Suharto took power after an alleged coup by theCommunist Party of Indonesia. In response, Suharto and his army massacred over a million Indonesians suspected of being communists.

1965 The Lockheed L-100, the civilian version of the C-130 Hercules, was introduced.

1966  The British protectorate of Bechuanaland declared its independence, and became the Republic of Botswana. Seretse Khamatook office as the first President.

1967  BBC Radio 1 was launched and Tony Blackburn presented its first show; the BBC’s other national radio stations also adopted numeric names.

1968  The Boeing 747 was shown to the public for the first time at the Boeing Everett Factory.

1970  Jordan made a deal with the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP) for the release of the remaining hostages from theDawson’s Field hijackings.

1975  The Hughes (later McDonnell-Douglas, now Boeing) AH-64 Apache made its first flight.

1977  Philippine political prisoners, Eugenio Lopez, Jr. and Sergio Osmeña III escaped from Fort Bonifacio Maximum Security Prison.

1979  The Hong Kong MTR commenced service with the opening of its Modified Initial System (aka. Kwun Tong Line).

1980  Ethernet specifications were published by Xerox working with Intel and Digital Equipment Corporation.

1982  Cyanide-laced Tylenol killed six people in the Chicago area.

1986 Martin Guptill, New Zealand cricketer, was born.

1986 Mordechai Vanunu, who revealed details of Israel covert nuclear program to British media, was kidnapped in Rome.

1989  Foreign Minister of West Germany Hans-Dietrich Genscher‘s speech from the balcony of the German embassy in Prague.

1990 The Dalai Lama unveiled the Canadian Tribute to Human Rights in Ottawa.

1991  President Jean-Bertrand Aristide of Haiti was forced from office.

1993  An earthquake hit India‘s Latur and Osmanabad district of Marathwada (Au rangabad division) leaving tens of thousands of people dead and many more homeless.

1994  Aldwych tube station (originally Strand Station) of the London Underground closed after eighty-eight years of service.

1999 Japan’s worst nuclear accident at a uranium reprocessing facility inTōkai-mura, northeast of Tokyo.

2004 The first images of a live giant squid in its natural habitat were taken 600 miles south of Tokyo.

2004 – The AIM-54 Phoenix, the primary missile for the F-14 Tomcat, was retired from service.

2005 – The controversial drawings of Muhammad were printed in the Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten.

2006 the National Assembly of the Republic of Serbia adopted the Constitutional Act that proclaimed the new Constitution of Serbia.

2009 – The 2009 Sumatra earthquakes  killed more than 1,115 people.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


366 days of gratitude

September 29, 2016

 

 

She began to measure herself in contentment and laughter rather than inches and pounds.

Today I’m grateful for contentment and laughter in more than ample measure.


Word of the day

September 29, 2016

Blateration – blather; foolish talk; loquacious nonsense; yammering on without really saying anything.


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