Word of the day

October 31, 2017

Inisitijitty – a worthless, ridiculous looking person.


NZ chunks beat Aussie lumps

October 31, 2017

Lolly lovers anguishing over the decision to move the production of pineapple lumps to Australia can relax.

The alternative, and original version, will still be produced in Oamaru.

“Pineapple Chunks” have been made at the current site of Rainbow Confectionary in Oamaru since 1953 to the same recipe Charles Diver developed for “Pineapple Chunks” under the Regina brand. Containing real pineapple juice, Rainbow manufactured “Pineapple Chunks” are widely available in supermarkets nationwide.

Rainbow Confectionery is the largest manufacturer of pineapple confectionery (known as “Chunks”, “Pieces” or “Bites”) in New Zealand, with product sold under Regina, Awesome Value, Rainbow and Private Label brands.

The company currently employs nearly 80 permanent staff, increasing to approximately 120 during seasonal periods. It has recently completed a multi-million dollar expansion of its Oamaru factory, demonstrating a commitment to producing Kiwi made treats for New Zealanders to enjoy.

With a product portfolio comprising gummies and jelly lollies (e.g. party mixes, planes), marshmallow products including Easter Eggs and choc fish, it is also the only New Zealand manufacturer of Jelly Beans.

Rainbow Confectionery is proudly New Zealand owned and believes in the importance of offering New Zealanders locally made confectionery. The company plans to continue making great tasting confectionery in Oamaru for many years to come.

I understand the importance of trade and the danger buy-local campaigns can pose to that.

But I admire the entrepreneurial spirit of the people behind the business and the role they play as a significant employer in North Otago.

And while I don’t eat a lot of sweets, when I do I’ll be supporting the local business.

Rural round-up

October 31, 2017

Beltex sheep breed focus of field day – Sally Rae:

The Beltex sheep breed will be under the spotlight at a field day in Canterbury tomorrow.

Former Invermay head Dr Jock Allison, Canterbury farmer Blair Gallagher and farm adviser John Tavendale, with their families, are behind Beltex New Zealand, which has brought the breed to New Zealand.

Three properties will be visited at the Beef + Lamb New Zealand Central Canterbury Farming for Profit field day, looking at three different systems; lamb weaning, ram selection and calf rearing. . .

Fonterra doubts ETS for dairy – Richard Rennie:

As the new Government pushes for a zero carbon economy by 2050 a Fonterra submission on what a low emission economy means has highlighted issues it maintains challenge a transition into the Emissions Trading Scheme for dairy.

The new Government has indicated it wants farming to contribute to greenhouse gas emission costs, possibly incurring 5% of those costs initially.

The farmer co-operative has submitted to the Productivity Commission’s inquiry into the impact of a low emissions economy on economic well-being and production. . . 

Milligans Food Group joins GDT Marketplace:

Oamaru-based company Milligans Food Group is among three additional dairy ingredient suppliers to join Global Dairy Trade’s GDT Marketplace.

Milligans supplies and manufactures food ingredients, consumer food products and animal nutrition products.

Specialised food and food service products were manufactured, blended and packed on-site then marketed across New Zealand, Australia, Asia Pacific, the Middle East and the United States. . . 

Drop in asparagus crop blamed on wet weather:

Wet weather over the past few months is leading to a big drop in the amount of asparagus being grown this year, according to a grower near Levin.

Cam Lewis, the director of TenderTips in Horowhenua, said he was seeing a 50 percent drop in his crop and there was a lot less asparagus around this year

He said that was keeping prices up. . . 

Farmers Fast Five – David Clark – Claire Inkson:

Where we ask a farmer five quick questions about farming, and what agriculture means to them. Today we talk to Mid Canterbury Proud Farmer David Clark.

1.    How long have you been farming?

I grew up in the North Island and left school at the end of the 6th Form at a time when farming in New Zealand was very tough coming out of the ’80s downturn. I was very fortunate to be employed by the Cashmore Family at Orere, SE of Auckland. It was during this time that my employers showed me by example that there was a future in farming if you worked hard and did things well, this set me on my course.

2.    What sort of farming were you involved in?

My parents had been both Town Milk Dairy and Sheep and Beef Farmers and I was determined to make a start for myself so started contract fencing which then led into a wider range of Agricultural Contracting activities. In 1994 my parents sold their farm and I sold my contracting business and we pooled our resources and purchased a dryland sheep property at Valetta, inland Mid Canterbury. It soon became very clear that we needed to develop irrigation on the property in order to move to an intensive arable farm system. . . 

Don’t know or won’t tell?

October 31, 2017

Labour is being loud about what it wants to do, but quiet about what it will cost:

New Finance Minister Grant Robertson needs to front up on the new coalition government’s spending plans and not make inaccurate excuses, National Party Finance Spokesperson Steven Joyce says.

“Mr Robertson has done two long-form interviews over this weekend and yet New Zealanders are still none the wiser about the cost of the coalition’s programme and the impact on their back pockets.

“Saying that he won’t reveal the numbers because he didn’t have access to the public service to prepare them as he did on TV3’s The Nation, is just not good enough,” Mr Joyce says.

“All parties in post-election coalition negotiations were given access to the public service to cost their commitments so that excuse just doesn’t wash.

“That sounds like someone who simply doesn’t want to reveal the numbers.

“He’s either had them costed and doesn’t like what they add up to, or not had them costed. Either way it’s not a reassuring start.

“New Zealand’s healthy government accounts are the product of the hard work of millions of Kiwis. They are entitled to know how much has gone out of their collective pockets in the process of forming this government.

“They also have a right to know whether the new government’s spending plans in actual dollars will match the cast-iron commitments Labour repeatedly made before the election.

“Mr Robertson is already acknowledging his budget is ‘very tight’ and ‘ambitious’.

He needs to front up quickly with the cost of this coalition.”

Whether it’s fair or not, Labour is perceived to be weak on  financial literacy. This silence on costs adds evidence to that perception.

Either they know and won’t say, which begs the question, what are they hiding?

Or they simply don’t know, which is irresponsible and incompetent.

The outgoing National-led government left the government books in a very healthy state with plenty in the kitty and forecasts of on-going surpluses.

The incoming government either can’t work out how much they’re planning to spend, or have worked it out and won’t tell us, both of which are unacceptable.

Quote of the day

October 31, 2017

Right is right even if no-one else does itJuliette Low who was born on this day in 1860.

October 31 in history

October 31, 2017

475  Romulus Augustulus was proclaimed Western Roman Emperor.

1517  Protestant Reformation: Martin Luther posted his 95 theses on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg.

1587  Leiden University Library opened.

1795  John Keats, British poet, was born (d. 1821).

1822  Emperor Agustín de Iturbide attempted to dissolve the Mexican Empire.

1860 Juliette Low, American founder of the Girl Scouts (d. 1927)

1861  American Civil War: Citing failing health, Union General Winfield Scott resigned as Commander of the United States Army.

1863  The Land Wars resumed as British forces in New Zealand led byGeneral Duncan Cameron began their Invasion of the Waikato.

Lieutenant-Major Sir Duncan A. Cameron.jpg

1864  Nevada was admitted as the 36th U.S. state.

1876  A monster cyclone ravaged India, resulting in over 200,000 deaths.

1887  Chiang Kai-shek, Nationalist Chinese leader, former Republic of China president, was born(d. 1975).

1908 Muriel Duckworth, Canadian activist, was born (d. 2009).

1913 Dedication of the Lincoln Highway, the first road across the United States.

1913 – The Indianapolis Street Car Strike and subsequent riot began.

1917  World War I: Battle of Beersheba – “last successful cavalry charge in history”.

1918  Banat Republic was founded.

1920  Dick Francis, Welsh-Caymanian jockey and author, was born (d. 2010).

1923 The first of 160 consecutive days of 100 degrees at Marble Bar, Western Australia.

1924  World Savings Day was announced in Milan by the Members of the Association at the 1st International Savings Bank Congress (World Society of Savings Banks).

1926 Magician Harry Houdini died of gangrene and peritonitis that developed after his appendix ruptured.

1931  Dan Rather, American television journalist, was born.

1937 – Tom Paxton, American singer-songwriter and guitarist, was born.

1938  Great Depression: In an effort to restore investor confidence, theNew York Stock Exchange unveiled a fifteen-point programme aimed to upgrade protection for the investing public.

1940 – Judith Wilcox, Baroness Wilcox, English businesswoman and politician, was born.

1940   The Battle of Britain ended.

1941  After 14 years of work, drilling was completed on Mount Rushmore.

1941   The destroyer USS Reuben James was torpedoed by a German U-boat near Iceland, killing more than 100 United States Navy sailors.

1943  World War II: An F4U Corsair accomplished the first successfulradar-guided interception.

1949  Bob Siebenberg, American drummer (Supertramp), was born.

1954 Algerian War of Independence: The Algerian National Liberation Front began a revolt against French rule.

1956 Suez Crisis: The United Kingdom and France began bombing Egypt to force the reopening of the Suez Canal.

1961 – Sir Peter Jackson, New Zealand actor, director, producer, and screenwriter, was born.

1963  An explosion at the Indiana State Fair Coliseum (now Pepsi Coliseum) in Indianapolis killed 74 people during an ice skating show.

1968  Vietnam War October surprise: Citing progress with the Paris peace talks, US President Lyndon B. Johnson announced  he had ordered a complete cessation of “all air, naval, and artillery bombardment of North Vietnam” effective November 1.

1973  Mountjoy Prison helicopter escape. Three Provisional Irish Republican Army members escaped from Mountjoy Prison aboard a hijacked helicopter.

1984 Indian Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was assassinated by two security guards.

1985 Keri Hulme’s novel The Bone People won the Booker Prize.

Keri Hulme’s Bone people wins Booker Prize

1986  The 5th congress of the Communist Party of Sweden was inaugurated. During the course of the congress the party name is changed to the Solidarity Party and the party ceases to be a communist party.

1994  An American Eagle ATR-72 crashed in Roselawn, Indiana, after circling in icy weather, killing 68 passengers and crew.

1996  Fokker F100  TAM Transportes Aéreos Regionais Flight 402 crashed into several houses in São Paulo, Brazil killing 98 including 2 on the ground.

1998 Iraq disarmament crisis began: Iraq announced it would no longer cooperate with United Nations weapons inspectors.

1999  EgyptAir Flight 990 crashed off the coast of Nantucket, Massachusetts, killing all 217 on-board.

1999 – Yachtsman Jesse Martin returned to Melbourne after 11 months of circumnavigating the world, solo, non-stop and unassisted.

2000   Singapore Airlines Boeing 747-400 Flight 006 collided with construction equipment upon takeoff in Taipei, Taiwan killing 79 passengers and four crew members.

2000 – A chartered Antonov An-26 exploded after takeoff in Northern Angola killing 50.

2000 – Soyuz TM-31 launched, carrying the first resident crew to theInternational Space Station. The ISS has been continuously crewed since.

2002 A federal grand jury in Houston, Texas indicts former Enron Corp. chief financial officer Andrew Fastow on 78 counts of wire fraud, money laundering, conspiracy and obstruction of justice related to the collapse of his ex-employer.

2003 – Mahathir bin Mohamad resigned as Prime Minister of Malaysia and was replaced by Deputy Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, marking an end to Mahathir’s 22 years in power.

2011 – The global population of humans reached seven billion. This day is recognised by the United Nations as Seven Billion Day.

2014 – Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo crashed in the Mojave Desert during a test flight.

2015 – Metrojet Flight 9268 was bombed over the northern Sinai Peninsula, killing all 224 people on board.

2015 – New Zealand’s All Blacks became the first team to win consecutive Rugby World Cups and the first to win the title three times.

All Blacks defend World Cup title

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia

Word of the day

October 30, 2017

Dadirri –  inner, deep listening and quiet, still awareness; a ‘tuning in’ experience with the specific aim to come to a deeper understanding of the beauty of nature.

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