Rural round-up

July 29, 2015

Warnings as evidence of El Niño looms – Ingrid Hipkiss:

MetService has issued a warning to farmers as evidence grows that a major El Niño event is underway.

It is marked by weather extremes, including very dry conditions.

The ingredients of an El Niño event have been there for a few months, bringing to New Zealand a colder-than-usual June and July. . .

Scale next step for koura industry – Sally Rae:

The concept has been proven and what Otago Southland’s fledgling freshwater crayfish, or koura, farming industry needs now is scale.

Keewai is the brand of a business that stemmed from forestry company Ernslaw One’s decision to diversify into freshwater crayfish farming.

The company has been utilising fire ponds in its forests, spread throughout Otago and Southland, to provide an additional revenue stream. . .

Rural Family Support Trust busy all the time – Jill Galloway:

Chairwoman of the Manawatu/Rangitikei Rural Family Support Trust Dame Margaret Millard says the phone rang so much during a recent day she didn’t get time to eat. They were calls for help.

The trust has been busy asissting farmers and rural businesses. 

Millard says there are more rural suicides than quad bike deaths in a year.

Farmers worry about finances, the family and work on the farm.  That’s what they go to the trust about.

The rural support trust started in 1984.  They were the days of Rogernomics and farming changed, putting pressure on rural people. . .

Food for thought at horticulture conference:

A key note speaker at the national horticulture conference in Rotorua today has given fruit and vegetable growers some serious food for thought.

Canberra-based science writer and author Julian Cribb told the conference modern food production was devouring a vast amount of the world’s resources and was unsustainble.

“Every meal that you or I or anybody on earth eats costs the planet 10 kilos of top soil, so that’s a bucket of top soil, 800 litres of water, so it’s like a ute load of water, 1.3 litres of diesel fuel, and a third of a gram of pesticide,” he said. . .

Calf reading seminar abuzz:

More than 40 people attended the seminar, where Seales Winslow nutritionist Wendy Morgan spoke on getting the important aspects of calf rearing correct, from housing, hygiene, colostrum intake window and the essentials of the feeding regime, through to weaning, incorporating growing to target dates and weights.

Vet and calf rearing ”guru” Nicola Neal outlined all the problems that could be faced in the calf shed and how to identify and deal with them quickly, while Susan McEwan shared tips from her large scale bull and heifer calf rearing system. . .

Summary – Survey of Cereal Areas and Volumes – JULY 1, 2015:

The objective of this AIMI survey of growers was to determine, as at July 1, 2015:

• the final size of the 2015 harvest of wheat, barley and oats

• sales channels and levels of on-farm storage, both sold and unsold, of the 2015 harvest

• autumn sowings of wheat, barley and oats, and sowing intentions for the spring of 2015 . .

 


Rural round-up

July 28, 2015

Rural professionals asked to be vigilant for signs of personal drought pain – Tim Fulton:

Men have a habit of carrying forward problems in the recesses of their mind, farm accountant Pita Alexander has come to believe.

Most of his career has been social work with accountancy on the side, he quipped to peers at the Railway Tavern in Amberley.

Stock agents, bankers, accountants and farm advisors were offered the customary round of sandwiches and savouries at Wednesday’s mini meeting, but the mood was subdued. One speaker labelled the drought – not to mention the crash in dairying – a “precipice”.

That’s financial – millions upon millions in lost income – and very personal. . .

Forest safety director appointed:

A National Safety Director, Fiona Ewing, has been appointed to advance the work of the Forest Industry Safety Council (FISC).

This is a key role in the recently-formed Council, set-up to lead safety culture change and to drive improvement in safety performance across the sector.

Ms Ewing has 30 years’ experience as a health and safety professional in a wide range of industries including energy, engineering, construction, agriculture and forestry in the United Kingdom. Her most recent position was Group Manager Health Safety Environment and Quality for Powerco. . .

Hurunui irrigation project on hold:

A company developing an irrigation scheme in North Canterbury has put plans on hold while it waits for the Environment Court to give a final ruling on consents.

The board of the Hurunui Water Project has decided to not continue spending money on the $400 million Waitohi Irrigation Scheme, to conserve funds it might need for potential legal costs.

The proposed water storage is planned to sit along the length of the upper Waitohi River and provide irrigation around the Hawarden area. . .

New Māori aquaculture agreements signed:

New regional agreements for Māori commercial aquaculture have been signed by Government Ministers today, including Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

Three regional agreements have been signed with iwi from the Auckland, Tasman, and Marlborough regions following successful negotiations between the Crown and regional Iwi aquaculture organisations.

The agreements are the result of the Māori Commercial Aquaculture Claims Settlement Act 2004, which requires the Crown to provide Iwi aquaculture organisations with 20% of new commercial aquaculture space consented since October 2011, or anticipated to occur into the future.  . .

King Salmon looks at Southland expansion:

The world’s largest king salmon farmer is looking to move into Southland once space for a new fish farm can be found.

New Zealand King Salmon says the project would be worth $100 million a year and create 150 jobs.

But first it has to find a place to put its new farm.

The company’s chief executive, Grant Rosewarne, said the company was ready to expand so searched around New Zealand and decided south was the way to go. . .

New seafood and marine centre welcomed:

The decision by Plant & Food Research to invest with Port Nelson in a new purpose-built research facility in Akersten Street is great news for Nelson, says local MP Dr Nick Smith.

“This investment helps lock in Nelson’s status as the seafood capital of New Zealand. The industry already contributes $300 million per year in GDP and 3,000 jobs to the regional economy but the future depends on an ongoing investment in science and technology to generate more value, maintain high food standards and ensure sustainability of the resource,” Dr Smith says.

The total investment of $7.5 million, including shared facilities, specialist fit-out and tenant fit-out is to be built by Port Nelson but leased by Plant & Food for a term of 25 years to house the government research company’s 38 science and support staff. . .

 


Where to for SFF?

July 28, 2015

Silver Fern has suspended trading on its shares to progress its capital raising initiative.

The grapevine is buzzing with what might happen from bits of the company being sold off to a considerable injection from overseas and/or domestic investors to shore it up and allow it to carry on.

 

 


Rural round-up

July 27, 2015

TPP must deliver, say beef producers:

Beef producers from five Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) member countries are calling for a high-quality market access deal on beef to be secured at the TPP ministerial meeting in Hawaii this month.

Negotiators and trade ministers from the 12 TPP countries will meet in Maui in late July, with the goal of reaching agreement on the outstanding issues across the TPP agenda.

The Five Nations Beef Alliance (FNBA)1 says it is vital that a comprehensive, trade liberalising deal be finalised. . .

North Canterbury farmers get reprieve on intensification limits – Tim Fulton:

Farmers dealing with drought in North Canterbury have been spared the “unintended consequations” of rules that could have stunted their recovery.

Environment Canterbury (ECan) will no longer apply its proposed “10 per cent rule” in the Hurunui catchment, meaning farmers will not be forced to get resource consent for normal farming practices, like re-stocking and applying fertilisers.

ECan will no longer consider some of these improvements a “land use” change triggering its so-called “10 per cent” limit. . .

Hawke’s Bay ‘Land Girl’ honoured:

Veterans’ Affairs Minister Craig Foss will today present a pin and certificate of appreciation to Hawke’s Bay ‘Land Girl’ Tiny (Helen) White.

During World War II, Mrs White and more than 4000 other New Zealand women volunteered for organisations such as the Women’s Land Service.

“These women, commonly referred to as Land Girls, took up the roles of the men sent overseas — they worked on farms and in other essential industries,” Mr Foss says. . .

From city to country to DWN coordinator:

It was the call of the land that saw Dairy Women’s Network’s newest staff member pack up her family from living the city life and head back to the family’s 830-cow dairy farm.

Melissa Sinton, who has just taken over the role of DWN regional convenor coordinator for the lower North Island, was working in pharmacy in Rotorua three years ago, when she was encouraged to come back to the family farm in Arohena, south east of Te Awamutu.

“As a mum of three young boys, it was an opportunity that was too good to pass up. Moving back to the farm was definitely something I did for myself, but more so for my family,” she said. . .

 

Hamilton Honey Scores Sweet Silver at National Awards:

Honey collected from hives at three popular Hamilton locations has claimed a silver medal at the recent National Beekeepers Association National Honey Competition.

Kirikiriroa Honey, produced by Waikato firm Sweetree, claimed second prize in the Beekeepers Special Reserve section of the awards, held in Taupo in June.

The awards’ Special Reserve Category included 12 entries. . .

 

Agcarm President Mark Christie to the 68th Agcarm Annual Conference

Like all well run organisations, Agcarm has a clear vision.

“To protect and enhance the health of crops and animals through innovation and responsible use of quality products.”

From this, our objectives focus on sustainable, science based innovation, where high quality products result in high quality produce for local and global consumption.

They also focus on the strong need for stewardship and responsible use, while ensuring user and environmental safety. . .

Cows master maze make mice, look like dimwits – Julie Power:

Everyone knows rats and mice can navigate mazes, but cows?

New research shows cows can be taught to follow sounds to find food in a maze. Some cows got a perfect score, when tested four times a day for four days straight. 

And confirming that some cows are smarter than others, heifer number two nailed it immediately from day one of testing, amazing researchers when she found the food in less than 20 seconds. . .


NZ open for business and people

July 27, 2015

Prime Minister John Key today used his speech to the National Party conference yesterday to reiterate his Government’s commitment to an open economy which embraces free trade and immigration.

. . . Earlier generations could never have imagined the global opportunities opening up for New Zealand.
I want to lead a country that embraces those opportunities.
An open and confident country that backs itself on the world stage.
As I’ve said many times, we won’t get rich selling things to 4.5 million New Zealanders.
But we could by selling to 4.5 billion people overseas.
Our Party supports strong international connections.
We value the benefits that free trade agreements deliver and the opportunities they offer.
I back our farmers, our manufacturers, our ICT companies and in fact all our export industries to succeed.
If we can get an equal crack at world markets, we’re up there with the best in the world.
That opportunity is what free trade is about for New Zealand.
When the previous Government, with the full support of National, signed a free trade agreement with China in 2008, our annual exports to that country totalled $2.5 billion.
Since then, they’ve quadrupled and China is now our biggest trading partner.
That FTA has had huge benefits for New Zealand.
Just a few months ago, I was in Seoul to witness Tim Groser signing another free trade agreement – this time with Korea.
When that agreement comes into force, half our exports to Korea will immediately be tariff-free, and almost all the rest will follow.
I can tell you that the kiwifruit growers of Te Puke are going to be delighted when the 45 per cent tariffs they currently face are finally removed.
We’re also in the final stages of negotiating the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.
TPP has been a big focus for our Government.
A successful conclusion will mean a trade agreement with a number of countries, including the giant economies of the United States and Japan.
This is something that successive governments in New Zealand, of both stripes, have been actively pursuing for many years.
That’s because it will mean better deals for Kiwi producers and exporters, better access to world markets, and better prospects for growing those markets in the future.
It will help diversify the economy through a broader range of trade and investment relationships.
And it will flow through to higher incomes and more jobs for New Zealanders.

The ability to export freely and earn the returns from exports unhampered by tariffs and other protective measures is one part of our international connectedness.

Immigration is the other.

New Zealand’s connectedness with the world is also about people coming to New Zealand to live and work.

Immigration benefits New Zealand because people coming here provide more of the labour, skills, capital and business links we need to grow.
A lot of people coming to New Zealand settle here in Auckland.
But as I go around other parts of New Zealand, mayors and employers often tell me they can’t get enough workers of the type local businesses need.
Southland, for example, is always crying out for workers in the dairy sector.
Across the whole South Island, in fact, the unemployment rate is a very low 3.6 per cent.
I can assure people that New Zealanders will always be first in line for jobs. That will not change.
And Auckland, as our largest city, will continue to grow.
But I believe we can do a better job of matching the needs of regions with available migrants and investors.
So today I’m announcing some changes to our immigration settings.
The first is aimed at encouraging people who come to New Zealand as skilled migrants to take up jobs in in the regions.
Around 10,000 skilled migrants get residence each year, together with their family members, and almost half of them come to Auckland.
We want to balance that out a bit, by attracting more people into other parts of the country to help grow local economies.
Currently, skilled migrants with a job offer get 10 extra points if that job is outside Auckland, and those points count towards the 100 they require.
From 1 November, we will treble that, and give them 30 extra points.
In return, they’ll have to commit to a region for at least 12 months – up from the current requirement of three months.
New Zealand also needs entrepreneurs to start new businesses, expand existing firms and create jobs.
So the second change we’ll make is to encourage entrepreneurs wanting to come to New Zealand to look for business opportunities in the regions.
Last year we launched an Entrepreneur Work Visa, targeting migrants who offer high-level business experience, capital and international connections.
Currently, people applying for this visa get 20 extra points if they set up a business outside Auckland, and that counts towards the 120 they require.
From 1 November, we will double that to 40 extra points.
Immigration New Zealand expects to approve up to 200 people next year under this visa.
With the changes we’re making, we expect to see most of these entrepreneurs setting up or growing businesses outside Auckland and creating new jobs across the country.
The third change I’m announcing will help employers find out faster whether New Zealanders are available to fill a particular vacancy, before they lodge a visa application with Immigration New Zealand.
From 1 November, they’ll be able to contact Work and Income directly to check availability.
This is a small measure, but it’s been really appreciated by employers in Queenstown and we’re extending it across the country.
The fourth announcement I want to make today is that the Government intends to provide a pathway to residence for a limited number of long-term migrants on temporary work visas in the South Island.
These people and their families have been in New Zealand for a number of years.
Their children are at schools. Their families are valuable members of their communities. And they are conscientious workers paying their taxes.
Their employers want to hold onto them because there aren’t enough New Zealanders available.
Around 600 overseas workers in lower-skilled occupations in the South Island have been rolling over short-term work visas for more than five years.
We envisage offering residency to people in this sort of situation, who commit to the South Island regions where they’ve put down roots.
We’ll set out the details of this pathway early next year.
Finally, the Government will consider a new global impact visa.
This would be targeted at young, highly-talented and successful technology entrepreneurs and start-up teams, who want to be based in New Zealand, employ talented Kiwis and reach across the globe.
There’s been quite a bit of interest in this idea and we’re going to look at it carefully over the next few months.
Ladies and Gentlemen.
Taken together, the changes I’ve announced today will contribute to a better balance in our immigration settings.
They will help spread the benefits of migration across the country, particularly in those regions crying out for workers, skills and investment.
As I said earlier, we need to be more connected with the world, because that’s where our opportunities come from.
This is just one small part of that approach.
We’ll also continue to press on with free trade agreements, build stronger investment links, and embrace the openness and connectedness that characterises successful countries in the 21st Century. . .

Immigration Minister Michael Woodhouse said:

. . . “Thousands of people from all over the world are moving to New Zealand because it is a good place to live, work and raise a family,” Mr Woodhouse says.

“Those people make a significant contribution to New Zealand’s economic growth by providing skills, labour and capital we need, along with valuable cultural and business links.

“New Zealanders will always be first in line for jobs and that won’t change,” Mr Woodhouse says.

“Currently, many new migrants settle in Auckland, which faces infrastructure challenges as it transforms into a truly international city. At the same time, business owners in other parts of New Zealand often struggle to find enough skilled workers to meet their demands.

“While there are already incentives to encourage migrants to move to areas outside of Auckland, we can do a better job of matching the needs of regions with available migrants and investors,” Mr Woodhouse says.

New measures to take effect from 1 November include:

  • Boosting the bonus points for Skilled Migrants applying for residence with a job offer outside Auckland from 10 to 30 points.
  • Doubling the points for entrepreneurs planning to set up businesses in the regions under the Entrepreneur Work Visa from 20 to 40 points.
  • Streamlining the labour market test to provide employers with more certainty, earlier in the visa application process.

In addition, from mid-2016 a pathway to residence will be provided for a limited number of long-term migrants on temporary work visas in the South Island.

“Unemployment across the Mainland is nearly half that of the North Island, and labour is in short supply,” Mr Woodhouse says.

“Most workers in lower skilled jobs must apply to renew their work visas every year. Some of these people have worked hard and paid tax to New Zealand for many years. They are valued at work and in their community, but have no avenue to settle here permanently.

“We’re looking at offering residence to some migrants, who have applied at least five times for their annual work visa. In return, we will require them to commit to the South Island regions where they’ve put down roots.”

These are very welcome changes which will make it easier for immigrants to settle in the regions and for employers in the regions to attract and retain staff.

I know a family who will benefit from the new policy to allow people on temporary visas who’ve been here for at least five years to settle.

They’ve been here for a decade, working, paying tax and contributing to the community.

They’ve spent 10s of thousands on immigration consultants but don’t have enough points to gain residency.

They are good people who would make good citizens and now they will be able to stay in the place they call home.

That’s good for them and the small town where they live.

Mr Woodhouse says the Government is also considering a new Global Impact Visa to attract high-impact entrepreneurs, investors and start-up teams to launch global ventures from New Zealand.

“I will announce further details later this year, but we envisage this visa would be offered to a limited number of younger, highly talented, successful and well-connected entrepreneurs from places like Silicon Valley,” Mr Woodhouse says.

This announcement shows National is open to business and people, a policy from which we’ll all benefit.


Rural round-up

July 25, 2015

Govt: Lighter rules insulating dairy shock – Suze Metherell:

Light regulation in the New Zealand dairy industry has insulated the wider economy from the sharp decline in prices for the country’s largest export commodity, according to Finance Minister Bill English.

Prices for whole milk powder, the country’s key commodity export, have plunged this year and dropped an unexpectedly large 10.7 percent in in the GlobalDairyTrade auction last week, sending the kiwi dollar to six-year-lows.

Dairy prices are now expected to remain lower for longer than previously forecast, amid higher global supplies, weak demand in China and an import ban in Russia on European dairy products, which are being sold into other market. . .

Vets to cut down on antibiotics:

The Veterinary Association has set an ambitious target to reduce the use of antibiotics to control disease in animals.

Its goal is to have New Zealand no longer having to rely on using antibiotics for animals by 2030.

President Steve Merchant said the country was well suited to the challenge because of its size, and the fact that it was already the world’s third lowest user of antibiotics on animals. . .

Changes to Health and Safety Reform Bill are sensible:

Federated Farmers believe the two month delay in the Select Committee reporting back the Health and Safety Reform Bill to Parliament has led to improvements for the farming industry.

The Bill has been reported back today.

Federated Farmers health and safety spokesperson Katie Milne says the Bill overall will make farms safer places.

Specifically she says the Bill has gone some way to recognising that farms are different to urban industrial workplaces. . .

 

New Māori aquaculture agreements signed:

New regional agreements for Māori commercial aquaculture have been signed by Government Ministers today, including Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

Three regional agreements have been signed with iwi from the Auckland, Tasman, and Marlborough regions following successful negotiations between the Crown and regional Iwi aquaculture organisations.

The agreements are the result of the Māori Commercial Aquaculture Claims Settlement Act 2004, which requires the Crown to provide Iwi aquaculture organisations with 20% of new commercial aquaculture space consented since October 2011, or anticipated to occur into the future. . .

Australian consortium said to be in no hurry to up their bid for A2 Milk – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Australian-based Freedom Foods and US-based Dean Foods are said to be in no hurry to up their bid for A2 Milk Co after the milk marketer this week told its suitors to try again after an initial offer wasn’t compelling and drew out as yet unnamed rival bidders.

A source close to the bidding consortium said they were underwhelmed by a trading update A2 Milk released at the same time as rejecting the offer and request for due diligence, saying it contained “nothing that would shift their view on valuation”.

Given Freedom Foods, the company’s previous joint venture partner in Australia, has a 19.1 percent blocking stake in A2 Milk, any rival bidders may struggle to get an offer across the line. . .

 

Wool market buoyant:

New Zealand Wool Services International Limited’s General Manager, Mr John Dawson reports that today’s sale of 6,617 bales saw increases of 1 to 2 percent overall. A good result, considering offering of 52 percent Coarse Crossbred Early Shorn and Second Shear types.

There was good demand for shorter Second Shear types 2 to 3 inch 32 to 35 micron as buyers bid to cover Chinese orders.

The trade weighted indicator was little changed from the last wool sale on 16th July. . .

 

 


Rural round-up

July 24, 2015

Certainty underpins healthy community :

Federated Farmers have placed an emphasis the importance of certainty within the primary sector as a key component of a thriving economy.

Speaking at the Local Government New Zealand conference, Federated Farmers president Dr William Rolleston told councils the number one issue facing the primary sector needs was certainty, and with certainty came the ability to make investment decisions that underpinned a thriving economy. 

Rolleston also spoke about the Resource Management Act (RMA), and heavy burden it placed on the rural sector.  . .

Shanghai Pengxin puts all its farms up for sale – Gerard Hutching:

Chinese company Shanghai Pengxin’s total farm assets in New Zealand are up for sale, including 16 farms and a conditional agreement to buy Lochinver Station – but they are unlikely to be sold.

Because the company wants to restructure, the Overseas Investment Office (OIO) requires it to offer its assets for sale to New Zealanders.

The 16 dairy farms totalling 7885 hectares are the former Crafar family farms, bought controversially for $200 million in 2012.

They were listed for sale on Trade Me on Sunday on a “price by negotiation” basis and by Tuesday had been viewed 657 times. . .

Paraparaumu farmer is looking to give away his best friend to a loving home – Jessy Edwards:

Brian Arnopp is being eaten out of house and home by his best mate, and it’s finally got too much for him.

So now Mr Bull is going free to a good home.

Arnopp, of Paraparaumu, has looked after Mr Bull since he was left at the 77-year-old’s farm four years ago. . .

Pipfruit industry on track:

The New Zealand pipfruit industry recently regained its position as the world’s most competitive pipfruit industry, making this year’s conference time to reflect, says Pipfruit NZ.

The pipfruit industry, which is due to hold its annual conference in Wellington in August, is one of the fastest growing primary sectors in the country. Exports have increased in value from $340m in 2012 to $536m in 2014. The industry is well on track to reach its $1bn export target by 2022.

Pipfruit NZ says the annual conference will be an important networking and educational event for the industry. . .

Time to show your true nature:

Farmers are being urged to enter the Ballance Farm Environment Awards, which now include the Auckland region.

Entries open on August 1.

Facilitated by the New Zealand Farm Environment (NZFE) Trust, the awards promote best-practice land management by showcasing the work of people farming in a way that is environmentally, economically and socially sustainable. . .

Farmers need government to heed ’10 point’ local government plan:

Federated Farmers want the government to give immediate attention to the Local Government New Zealand’s ’10 point plan’ for rates reform.

Federated Farmers Local Government spokesperson Katie Milne says the disastrous dairy payout prices in particular mean farmers want urgent action on inequities in the rates they pay to their local bodies.

“We farmers can’t control international prices. Neither can the government. But the government can legislate rates reform. It all helps, and the sooner the better,” Katie Milne says. . .

Te Karaka student awarded scholarship:

A Te Karaka student has been awarded the Mangatu Blocks and Ravensdown Scholarship, providing three years study at Auckland University.

Roland Taupara Brown completed his secondary schooling at Gisborne Boys High School where in his final year he was named Dux for 2014.

Brown says the scholarship provides him with a unique opportunity to focus on his studies in science and commerce at Auckland University. His Bachelor of Science degree will focus on green chemistry and his Bachelor of Commerce will provide the business disciplines to ensure a balance between environmental and commercial considerations. . .


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,666 other followers

%d bloggers like this: