July 30 in history

July 30, 2016

762  Baghdad was founded.

1419  First Defenestration of Prague.

1502 Christopher Columbus landed at Guanaja in the Bay Islands off the coast of Honduras during his fourth voyage.

1549 Ferdinando I de’ Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany, was born (d. 1609).

1608  Samuel de Champlain shot and killed two Iroquois chiefs which set the tone for FrenchIroquois relations for the next 100 years.

1619  The first representative assembly in the Americas, the House of Burgesses, convened for the first time.

1629  An earthquake in Naples killed 10,000 people.

1733  The first Masonic Grand Lodge in what became the United States was constituted in Massachusetts.

1756 Bartolomeo Rastrelli presented the newly-built Catherine Palace to Empress Elizabeth and her courtiers.

1811  Father Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla, leader of the Mexican insurgency, was executed by the Spanish.

1818 Emily Brontë, English novelist, was born (d. 1848).

1825 Malden Island was discovered.

1859 First ascent of Grand Combin.

1863 Henry Ford, American industrialist, was born (d. 1947).

1863 Indian Wars: Chief Pocatello of the Shoshone tribe signed the Treaty of Box Elder, agreeing to stop the harassment of emigrant trails in southern Idaho and northern Utah.

1864 American Civil War: Battle of the Crater – Union forces attempt edto break Confederate lines at Petersburg, Virginia by exploding a large bomb under their trenches.

1866 New Orleans’s Democratic government ordered police to raid an integrated Republican Party meeting, killing 40 people and injuring 150.

1871  The Staten Island Ferry Westfield’s boiler exploded, killing over 85 people.

1893 Fatima Jinnah, Pakistani Mother of the Nation, was born (d. 1967).

1898 Henry Moore, English sculptor, was born (d. 1986).

1916  Black Tom Island explosion in Jersey City.

1925 Alexander Trocchi, Scottish writer, was born (d. 1984).

1926 Christine McGuire, American singer (The McGuire Sisters), was born.

1930  Uruguay won the first Football World Cup.

1932  Premiere of Walt Disney’s Flowers and Trees, the first cartoon short to use Technicolor and the first Academy Award winning cartoon short.

1935 Ted Rogers, English comedian and game show host, was born (d. 2001).

1940 Sir Clive Sinclair, English entrepreneur and inventor (pocket calculator, home computer), was born.

1941 Paul Anka, Canadian singer and composer, was born.

1945   Japanese submarine I-58 sank the USS Indianapolis, killing 883 seamen.

1947 Arnold Schwarzenegger, Austrian-born American actor and 38th Governor of California, was born.

1950 Frank Stallone, American singer and actor, was born.

1953  Rikidōzan held a ceremony announcing the establishment of theJapan Pro Wrestling Alliance.

1956  A joint resolution of the U.S. Congress was signed by PresidentDwight D. Eisenhower, authorizing In God We Trust as the U.S. national motto.

1958 Kate Bush, English singer/songwriter, was born.

1958 Daley Thompson, English decathlete, was born.

1965  US President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Social Security Act of 1965 into law, establishing Medicare and Medicaid.

1969 Vietnam War: US President Richard M. Nixon made an unscheduled visit to South Vietnam and met  President Nguyen Van Thieu and U.S. military commanders.

1971  Apollo 15 Mission – David Scott and James Irwin on Apollo Lunar Module module, Falcon, landed with first Lunar Rover on the moon.

1971  An All Nippon Airways Boeing 727 and a Japanese Air Force F-86collided over Morioka killing 162.

1974  Watergate Scandal: US President Richard M. Nixon released subpoenaed White House recordings after being ordered to do so by the United States Supreme Court.

1974  Six Royal Canadian Army Cadetswere  killed and fifty-four injured in an accidental grenade blast at CFB Valcartier Cadet Camp.

1975  Three members of the Miami Showband and two gunmen were killed during a botched paramilitary attack in Northern Ireland.

1978  The 730 (transport), Okinawa changed its traffic on the right-hand side of the road to the left-hand side.

1979 Carless days were introduced in New Zealand to combat the second oil shock.

Carless days introduced

1980 Vanuatu gained independence.

1980  Israel’s Knesset passed the Jerusalem Law

1997  Eighteen lives were lost in the Thredbo Landslide.

2003  In Mexico, the last ‘old style’ Volkswagen Beetle rolled off the assembly line.

2006 World’s longest running music show Top of the Pops was broadcast for the last time on BBC Two after 42 years.

2006 Lebanon War: At least 28 civilians, including 16 children were killed by the Israeli Air Force in what Lebanese call the Second Qana massacre.

2009 A bomb exploded in Palma Nova, Mallorca, killing 2 police officers. Basque separatist group ETA was believed to be responsible.

2012 – A power grid failure left seven states in northern India without power, affecting 360 million people.

2014 – One hundred and fifty people were trapped after a landslide in the village of Ambe in the Pune district in India’s Maharashtra state with 20 killed.

Sourced from Wikipedia and NZ History Online.


366 days of gratitude

July 29, 2016

NBR’s annual Rich List was published today.

It’s a celebration of success in many fields with a little luck and a lot of work.

These people contribute to New Zealand’s success, creating jobs, producing goods and services and earning export income.

The story on philanthropists shows, they are also generous in helping others. I know a few of the others on the list who aren’t included in this story and they too give a lot.

Today I’m grateful for these, and the many others who aren’t included, whose success, directly or indirectly, helps us all.


Word of the day

July 29, 2016

Wamblecropt – overcome with indigestion;  afflicted with and incapacitated by rolling or uneasiness of the stomach.


Rural round-up

July 29, 2016

Sheep milk company markets to Taiwan:

A New Zealand company has launched two sheep milk powder products in Taiwan which are the first of their kind on the market.

Spring Sheep Milk is a partnership between Landcorp and investment company SLC Group, and milks 3000 ewes on a block of Wairakei Estate on the Central Plateau.

The company specialises in nutritional powders for adults in Asia and gelato for the New Zealand market. . .

Feds disappointed with Local Governmemt’s 8-point programme:

Federated Farmers congratulates Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) for producing a paper that seeks to provide a document for the future but is disappointed that it misses the mark.

Local Government New Zealand released its 8 point programme for a “future-focused resource management system” at their annual conference earlier today.

“We agree that our resource management system needs to be able to address challenges into the future,” says Chris Allen, Federated Farmers spokesperson on resource management.

Fur Industry Looks to Be Part of Government’s Predator-Free Solution:

New Zealand’s $130 million possum fur industry is seeking constructive ways to work with the Government in the wake of its announcement to eradicate rats, stoats and possums by 2050.

Fur Industry Council chair, Neil Mackie says: ” Predator Free New Zealand is a commendable and aspirational goal and we want to be part of the solution to achieve it.’

“We have been working closely with the Department of Conservation after the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment recognised the possum fur industry as having a valuable place in possum control. . .

Have your say on kiwifruit, pipfruit and potato insecticide:

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) is seeking your views on an application to import an insecticide, called Celsius, to control pests found in kiwifruit, pipfruit and potato crops.

The applicant, Adria New Zealand Limited, is looking to import Celsius, which contains the neonicotinoid thiamethoxam, for use as a selective insecticide, targeting specific insects that are known to attack these crops. . .

Factory Farmer? No I’m a family farmer – Lawson Mozley:

You see, every tme I spend a 10+ hour day farming this land I’m weighed down, but more so lifted up, by five generations of my family before me, and the countless generations that I hope will follow.

GM technology, efficiency overshadowed by fear

Apparently all of this history, meaning, and hope is overshadowed by the fact that my father and I use genetically engineered crops to decrease and even eliminate the needs for environmentally impactful pesticides. It’s nullified by our judicious use of herbicides and other pesticides when necessary to produce a safe, wholesome, high quality food product at a reasonable price. It’s undone by my use of vaccines to prevent diseases in my cattle and antibiotics when injuries or acute illnesses do occur . . .

Bayer Wairarapa Young Viticulturist of the Year 2016 announced:

Congratulations to Mark Langlands from Te Kairanga who became the Bayer Wairarapa Young Viticulturist of the Year 2016 on Thursday 28 July.

Langlands also won the competition last year showing he is a consistently strong, bright young viticulturist. However, he was unable to compete in the National Final in 2015 as he was overseas working a vintage in California. He is therefore thrilled that he can go forward and represent the Wairarapa this year and is determined to bring the trophy back to the region . . .


Friday’s answers

July 29, 2016

J Bloggs, Andrei, Teletext and Freddy posed the questions for which they get my thanks.

Should they have stumped us all they can claim a virtual bunch of winter sweet by leaving the answer below.


Nature thwarts all rivers swimmable goal

July 29, 2016

The Green Party’s goal to have all rivers swimable is emotionally appealing but one which will be thwarted by nature.

Some rivers will never be safe for swimming, not as a result of pollution by people or animals but by nature.

Natural pollutants include volcanoes, birds, native and introduced species, and, at least temporarily, storms.

There are however, lots of waterways that should and could be cleaner but the Greens’ every-river-swimmable stunt has already got offside it with farmers the party claims it wants to work with.

Wairarapa Federated Farmers president Jamie Falloon wasn’t impressed with the Greens’ approach – he says the Ruamahanga is perfectly swimmable.

“We’re really disappointed the Greens have picked the Ruamahanga to promote their political statements about swimmability versus wadeability.”

He says the only reason the river has a poor bill of health is the sewage plant upstream, because farmers have fenced off all waterways in the Ruamahanga catchment that are more than a metre wide and permanently flowing.

Mr Falloon says anyone who thinks dairy intensification needs to be reduced must simply dislike farmers, who are unwilling to work with the Greens after their “political stunt”.

 

Not when they use language like ‘the tragic state of the river’ and political stunts like getting schoolchildren to wade into the river in the middle of winter.”

It’s also irresponsible to go wading in the river when it’s in high flow due to rain, Mr Falloon says. . .

Emotion beats facts in politics and stunts get publicity but cleaning up waterways requires a co-operative approach and the Greens can’t even get Labour enthusiastic, in spite of their memorandum of understanding.

Labour leader Andrew Little says cleaning up the rivers wouldn’t be a priority for a Labour-led Government. . .

Improvements in water quality are already being achieved by co-operative efforts from central and local government, communities, farmers and other businesses.

More needs to be done. That requires more co-operation which won’t be achieved if major players like farmers and a political ally aren’t on-side.


Quote of the day

July 29, 2016

They helped to invent their version of Fred Dagg and that’s a great kindness by an audience. If you’re in people’s memories, that’s a very precious place to be. John Clarke who celebrates his 68th birthday today.

 


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