Thursday’s quiz

April 24, 2014

1. Who said, Ah yes, but if you wave they’ll wave back. and to what was he replying?

2. Whose autobiography is titled Adolf Hitler:My Part In His Downfall?

3. It’s guerre in Frnech,  guerra in Italian and Spanish and whawhai in Maori, what is it in English?

4. In which country are Flanders Fields?

5. How will you mark Anzac Day?


10/10

April 21, 2014

10/10 in the Herald’s politics quiz.


11/65

April 21, 2014

How much do you hate people?

I scored 11/65

You only sort of hate people. Sometimes. When they’re being the worst. And that’s perfectly natural. You don’t put up with any nonsense but you’re probably not a dick.

Well that’s a relief.

There’ times I prefer fewer people and sometimes enjoy none at all but I don’t think I’m guilty of misanthropy.


Friday’s answers

April 18, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. From which poem by which poet do these words come:

 . . . All changed, changed utterly:   
A terrible beauty is born.?

2. Who composed St Matthew’s Passion?

3. From which work by which composer does the  Hallelujah Chorus come?

4. By what name is Rapa Nui or Isla de Pascua more commonly known?

5. Hot Cross buns on Good Friday and Easter eggs on Sunday – or any time you want them?

Points for answers:

J Bloggs and Andrei win an electronic batch of hot cross buns for a clean sweep and bonuses for music.

Rob also wins the electronic hot cross buns with a bonus for supporting the meat industry.

Answers follow the break:

 

1. Easter 1916 by William Butler Yeats.

2. Johann Sebastian Bach

3. The Messiah by Georg Friedrich Handel.

4. Easter Island.

5. Since seeing both for sale in January several years ago I eat both on the right days only on principle.


Thursday’s questions

April 17, 2014

1. From which poem by which poet do these words come:

 . . . All changed, changed utterly:   
A terrible beauty is born.?

2. Who composed St Matthew’s Passion?

3. From which work by which composer does the  Hallelujah Chorus come?

4. By what name is Rapa Nui or Isla de Pascua more commonly known?

5. Hot Cross buns on Good Friday and Easter eggs on Sunday – or any time you want them?


69 facts about NZ

April 17, 2014

Buzzfeed looks at New Zealand and finds 69 facts some of which are:

1. The kea, a bird native to NZ, is known for pulling windscreen wipers off cars and eating the strips of rubber from windows.
2. The longest place name in the world is Taumatawhakatangihangakoauauotamateapokaiwhenuakitanatahu, a hill in Hawkes Bay.
3. No part of the country is more than 128km (79 miles) from the sea.
4. In the scene of Star Trek: First Contact, where we see Earth from space, Australia and Papua New Guinea are clearly visible but New Zealand is missing.
5. Wellington is the southernmost capital city in the world.
6. Only 5% of NZ’s population is human- the rest are animals.
7. NZ is the least corrupt nation in the world (tied with Denmark), according to the Corruptions Perception Index.
8. New Zealand has more Scottish pipe bands per capita than any other country in the world.
9. Blue Lake, in Nelson Lakes National Park, has the clearest water in the world.
10. New Zealand is home to the world’s smallest dolphin species.
11. There are no land snakes, native or introduced, in NZ.
12. New Zealand has three official languages: English, Māori and New Zealand Sign Language.
13. In 2008, TripAdvisor named Milford Sound (pictured below) the world’s top travel destination, based on an international survey. . . .

17. More people die in New Zealand each year playing lawn bowls than scuba diving.
18. NZ is home to more species of penguins than any other country.
19. In 1893, New Zealand became the first country to give women the right to vote.
20. Auckland is one of the most affordable cities in the world to live in.
21. One in three Auckland households own a boat. . . .

32. There are only two countries in the world where drug companies are permitted to advertise to the public: New Zealand and USA.
33. Kiwi Nancy Wake was the Gestapo’s most wanted person during World War II. She once killed a SS sentry with her bare hands.
34. More people live in Auckland than in the whole of the South Island.
35. The logo for the Royal New Zealand Air Force is a kiwi- a flightless bird.
36. In the Lord of the Rings films, the beer drunk on camera was a custom NZ brew called ‘Sobering Thought’.
37. The filming of these movies pumped around $200 million into the country’s economy. The New Zealand government even created a Minister for Lord of the Rings, to ensure the most money could be made from the films.
38. In 1996, a man broke into a radio station in Wanganui and took the manager hostage, demanding that they play the Muppet song “Rainbow Connection”.
39. Two NZ rescue dogs were taught to drive a car around a track, in order to prove the intelligence of shelter animals. . . .

43. NZ high schools and universities are permitted to keep a pound of uranium or thorium for educational purposes. However, there is a $1 million fine if it explodes.
44. There is a giant carnivorous snail living in the South Island.
45. From 1867 to 1927, the government planed ahead for shipwrecks by building supply-filled huts on remote islands.
46. There is a clock in Dunedin which has been running since 1864, despite never having been wound since it was made.
47. Gisborne airport has train tracks running across the middle of the runway. Quite often, trains and planes have to stop until one moves out of the way.
48. NZ had a 58% casualty rate in World War I. . .

58. In 2008, Henry the tuatara became a father for the first time at the age of 111. (A tuatara is a reptile native to New Zealand.)
59. New Zealand is the only country with the right to put Hobbit-related images on its currency. . . .

60. New Zealand was the last habitable land mass to be populated.
61. Three quarters of New Zealanders living overseas are in Australia.  . . .

65. New Zealand produces 100 kg of butter and 65 kg of cheese each year per person. . .

67. NZ has banned all television advertising on Good Friday, Easter Sunday, ANZAC Day, and Christmas Day. . .

69. There are more vending machines in Japan than there are people in New Zealand.


5/10

April 12, 2014

Only 5/10 in the NBR’s Biz Quiz (which has questions from this week’s news although it’s headed December 7th).


Friday’s answers

April 11, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places.

2. What are an ampersand  and an  octothorp?

3. It’s  écriture  in French,  scritto   in Italian, escritura in Spanish and  tuhituhi  in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is a libretto?

5. How much does how you write/speak matter?

Points for answers:

Willdwan got two right and a right-track for #3.

J Bloggs got 4 1/2.

Andrei wins an electronic peach crumble for five right and a bonus for extra information.

Answers follow the break.

Read the rest of this entry »


What bird are you?

April 10, 2014

What bird are you?

I’m a swan:

You are a gentle person, kind and loving to all those you meet. You move gracefully throughout the world, making people smile with your soft smile and positive energy. You are a bit quiet, but don’t let that fool anyone, you’re also smart as a whip.

Of all the adjectives you might apply to me I don’t think graceful would come readily to mind. It’s something I might aspire too but am a long way from reaching.


Thursday’s quiz

April 10, 2014

1. Who said: My spelling is Wobbly. It’s good spelling but it Wobbles, and the letters get in the wrong places. ?

2. What are an ampersand  and an  octothorp? (You might have heard the latter on Afternoons yesterday, I’d come across it a week ago and decided it would be a good word for this quiz).

3. It’s  écriture  in French,  scritto   in Italian, escritura in Spanish and  tuhituhi  in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is a libretto?

5. How much does how you write/speak matter?


Which British PM are you?

April 8, 2014

Which British PM are you?

I’m either Neville Chamberlain or William Pitt the Younger.


7/10

April 5, 2014

Only 7/10 in the Herald’s politics quiz.


Friday’s answers

April 4, 2014

Andrei and JBloggs provided the questions.

If they’ve stumped us all they can claim an electronic apple crumble by leaving the answers below.


Thursday’s quiz

April 3, 2014

It’s your turn to ask the questions again.

You don’t have to follow the five-question model I use and anyone who stumps us all will win an electronic apple crumble.


Friday’s answers

March 28, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: Something my mum taught me years and years and years ago, is life’s just too short to carry around a great bucket-load of anger and resentment and bitterness and hatreds and all that sort of stuff. ? (I’ll give you a hint as this probably isn’t an easy one, it’s a man, a politician of recent vintage and someone who I’m not sure put that into practice).

2. What are four of the five basic tastes?

3. It’s amertume  in French, amarezza in Italian,  amargo  in Spanish and kawa  in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What gives Pink Gin its colour?

5.  It is hardly possible to build anything if frustration, bitterness and a mood of helplessness prevail. Does this quote from Lech Walesa explain left wing politics?

Points for answers:

4 for Andrei.

2 3/4 for Gravedodger.

Clean sweeps for J Bloggs and Alwyn who win an electronic cream sponge for their efforts.

4 for Paranormal.

 

 

 

 

 

Answers follow the break:

 

Read the rest of this entry »


Thursday’s quiz

March 27, 2014

1. Who said: Something my mum taught me years and years and years ago, is life’s just too short to carry around a great bucket-load of anger and resentment and bitterness and hatreds and all that sort of stuff. ? (I’ll give you a hint as this probably isn’t an easy one, it’s a man, a politician of recent vintage and someone who I’m not sure put that into practice).

2. What are four of the five basic tastes?

3. It’s amertume  in French, amarezza in Italian,  amargo  in Spanish and kawa  in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What gives Pink Gin its colour?

5.  It is hardly possible to build anything if frustration, bitterness and a mood of helplessness prevail. Does this quote from Lech Walesa explain left wing politics?


5/10

March 23, 2014

Only 5/10 in NBR’s Biz Quiz - however, I’d like to claim a bonus for noticing it’s dated December 07.2013 although the questions refer to events this week.


8/10

March 22, 2014

8/10 in the Herald’s politics quiz.

One of those I missed was the one about Len Brown – my answer was wishful thinking.


Friday’s answers

March 21, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.?

2. Where in the human body would you find the macula?

3. Whose compositions included Music for Royal Fireworks and the opera Xerxes?

4. The Strait of Gibraltar connects which two bodies of water?

5. If you could eat only one fruit which would it be?

Points for answers:

Andrei, David, J Bloggs and Gravedodger win an electronic basket of fruit with five right.

Alwyn got four.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Thursday’s quiz

March 20, 2014

1. Who said: Gratitude is not only the greatest of virtues, but the parent of all the others.?

2. Where in the human body would you find the macula?

3. Whose compositions included Music for Royal Fireworks and the opera Xerxes?

4. The Strait of Gibraltar connects which two bodies of water?

5. If you could eat only one fruit which would it be?


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,168 other followers

%d bloggers like this: