Quote of the day

February 22, 2017

Oh all the time when Victoria Wood and I did our series. There were people asking ‘Can women be funny?’ People still ask that. It’s like asking: ‘Can women breathe in and out?’  – Julie Walters who celebrates her 67th birthday today.

She also said:

I keep seeing myself in my daughter, and I see my mother in me and in her. Bloody hell.

And:

In order to be creative you have to be allowed to fail.


Quote of the day

February 21, 2017

When I stand before God at the end of my life, I would hope that I would not have a single bit of talent left, and could say, ‘I used everything you gave me’.  – Erma Bombeck who was born on this day in 1927.

She also said:

Don’t confuse fame with success. Madonna is one; Helen Keller is the other.

And:

It is not until you become a mother that your judgment slowly turns to compassion and understanding.

And:

There is a thin line that separates laughter and pain, comedy and tragedy, humor and hurt.

And:

No one ever died from sleeping in an unmade bed. I have known mothers who remake the bed after their children do it because there is wrinkle in the spread or the blanket is on crooked. This is sick.


Word of the day

February 13, 2017

Cognize – know; understand; become aware of; perceive.


Quote of the day

February 8, 2017

It’s increasingly apparent that the absence of purpose – or of a moral language – within government, media or business, could become one of the most dangerous own goals for capitalism and for freedom.Elisabeth Murdoch who was born on this day in 1909.


January 27 in history

January 27, 2017

1186 Henry VI, the son and heir of the Holy Roman Emperor Frederick I, married Constance of Sicily.

1343 Pope Clement VI issued the Bull Unigenitus.

1606  Gunpowder Plot: The trial of Guy Fawkes and other conspirators began, ending with their execution on January 31.

1695 Mustafa II became the Ottoman sultan on the death of Ahmed II. Mustafa rules until his abdication in 1703.

1756 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Austrian composer was born  (d. 1791).

1785 The University of Georgia was founded, the first public university in the United States.

1825 The U.S. Congress approved Indian Territory clearing the way for forced relocation of the Eastern Indians on the “Trail of Tears“.

1832  Lewis Carroll, English author, was born (d. 1898).
1888 The National Geographic Society was founded in Washington, D.C..

1908 William Randolph Hearst, Jr., American newspaper magnate, was born (d. 1993).

1921 Donna Reed, American actress, was born (d. 1986).

1933  Mohamed Al-Fayed, Egyptian billionaire businessman, was born.

1939 First flight of the Lockheed P-38 Lightning.

1941 Beatrice Tinsley, New Zealand astronomer and cosmologist , was born  (d. 1981).

1944  Nick Mason, English drummer (Pink Floyd),was born.

1944 The 900-day Siege of Leningrad was lifted.

1945 – World War II: The Red Army liberated the Auschwitz-Birkenau concentration camp in Poland.

1951 Brian Downey, Irish musician (Thin Lizzy), was born.

1951 Nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site began with a one-kiloton bomb dropped on Frenchman Flat.

1962 Peter Snell broke the world mile record  on grass at Cook’s Garden, Wanganui, in a time of 3 mins 53.4 secs.

Peter Snell breaks world mile record

1967 Apollo 1Astronauts Gus Grissom, Edward White and Roger Chaffee were killed in a fire during a test of the spacecraft at the Kennedy Space Centre.

1967 – More than 60 nations signed the Outer Space Treaty banning nuclear weapons in space.

1968 Mike Patton, American singer (Faith No More), was born.

1973 Paris Peace Accords officially ended the Vietnam War. ColonelWilliam Nolde was killed in action becoming the conflict’s last recorded American combat casualty.

1974 The Brisbane River flooded causing the largest flood to affect Brisbane City in the 20th Century.

1979 Daniel Vettori, New Zealand cricketer, was born.

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1981 Tony Woodcock, New Zealand rugby union player, was born.

1983 Pilot shaft of the Seikan Tunnel, the world’s longest sub-aqueous tunnel (53.85 km) between the Japanese islands of Honshū and Hokkaidō, broke through.

1984 Pop singer Michael Jackson suffered second and third degree burn on his scalp during the filming of a Pepsi commercial in the Shrine Auditorium.

1996 Colonel Ibrahim Baré Maïnassara deposed the first democratically elected president of Niger, Mahamane Ousmane, in a military coup.

1996 Germany first observed International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

2006 Western Union discontinued its Telegram and Commercial Messaging services.

2010 – The 2009 Honduran constitutional crisis ended when Porfirio Lobo Sosa became the new President.

2011 – Arab Spring: The Yemeni Revolution began as over 16,000 protestors demonstrate inSana’a.

2013  – 242 people died in a nightclub fire in the city of Santa Maria, Brazil.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


2015 in review

January 12, 2017

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The Louvre Museum has 8.5 million visitors per year. This blog was viewed about 270,000 times in 2015. If it were an exhibit at the Louvre Museum, it would take about 12 days for that many people to see it. . . 

 

How did they find you?

The top referring sites (thank you)  in 2015 were:

No Minister 
Kiwiblog
Keeping Stock (who hasn’t blogged for a couple of years. This shows he still has a lot of fans).
twitter.com
facebook.com

The 5 most active commenters were:

Dave Kennedy  1626 COMMENTS

Mr E 1027 COMMENTS

TraceyS 1021 COMMENTS

farmerbraun 562 COMMENTS

Mr G 513 COMMENTS

Thanks to those of you who pop in to read and special thanks to those of you who add to the conversation too.

I’m enjoying blogging less, but have no intention of giving up altogether yet.

Click here to see the complete report.


Quote of the day

January 12, 2017

The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing. –    Edmund Burke who was born on this day in 1729.

He also said:

All tyranny needs to gain a foothold is for people of good conscience to remain silent.

And:

Justice is itself the great standing policy of civil society; and any eminent departure from it, under any circumstances, lies under the suspicion of being no policy at all.

And:

He that struggles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper.

And:

It is a general popular error to suppose the loudest complainers for the public to be the most anxious for its welfare.


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