Earth sandwich

January 22, 2020

A New Zealander and a Spaniard have created an earth sandwich with 20,000 kilometres of filling:

. . . Etienne Naude and a counterpart in Spain have placed slices of bread on precise points, either side of the planet, 20,000 kilometres apart.

The men used longitude and latitude to make sure they were precisely opposite.

Naude told Morning Report he did it because he had the ability to do it – that, and university holidays aren’t very exciting.

One piece of bread that makes up the sandwich lies on Auckland’s Bucklands Beach, the other piece in Spain, placed by a counterpart Naude found in a subreddit.

“It’s amazing that we’ve actually been able to collaborate and do something like this at exact opposite points of the globe,” Naude said.

“We made sure to get the exact location with Google Maps, to get us within a few metres range, and then we used the actual image data on Google Maps to pinpoint ourselves even closer than that.” . . 

Travellers often get asked where they come from.

When Kiwis answer, we often find the questioner has at best a very vague notion of where New Zealand is and often have no idea at all.

That’s rarely a problem in Spain for two reasons . The first is kiwifruit, Spain is our biggest export market for this fruit.

The other is that New Zealand is the antipodes of Spain and when I tell people in Spain I’m from Nueva Zelanda, they almost always reply, el pais mas lejos de España (the country furthest from Spain).


Word of the day

January 18, 2020

Orthorexia – an unhealthy obsession with defining and maintaining the perfect diet; an obsession with ‘proper’ or ‘healthy’ eating.


Rural round-up

January 14, 2020

Is New Zealand armed for future bio security threats? – Louisa Steyl:

A decade of significant biosecurity breaches have cost the New Zealand economy millions. Reporter LOUISA STEYL finds out if our security borders can withstand modern pressures or are we even more at risk?

“It was scary. I couldn’t work out what was going on.”

Waikaia farmer Rodney Williamson wasn’t sure what the implications would be when the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) found two velvetleaf plants on his Southland farm. 

That was in 2016. . .

Avocado growers prepared in case of summer drought

Avocado growers are confident they will be able to cope in the event of a summer drought.

Forecasters from the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research said the soil in the top three-quarters of the country had become dry in the past week, with no immediate reprieve in sight.

Avocado industry group Avoco spokesperson Steve Trickett said there was a reasonable crop load at the moment and growers were fairly relaxed. . . 

Shear-a-thon part of fundraiser for young Tapanui family – Jamie Seattle:

The farming industry is uniting to help Shaun Bradley and his family through one of their biggest challenges. 

Bradley, 28, is a Tapanui farm manager battling cancer. He has stage four B cell non hodgkin’s lymphoma.

West Otago communities have rallied around Bradley, his wife Olivia and their 8 1/2-month-old daughter Charlotte. The couple recently celebrated their second wedding anniversary. 

His employers, Nelson and Fiona Hancox, and PGG Wrightson wool buyer Jared Manihera are arranging a 24-hour shear-a-thon as a fundraiser for the Bradley family. . .

‘Like sending bees to war’: the deadly truth behind your almond-milk obsession – Annette McGivney:

Dennis Arp was feeling optimistic last summer, which is unusual for a beekeeper these days.

Thanks to a record wet spring, his hundreds of hives, scattered across the central Arizona desert, produced a bounty of honey. Arp would have plenty to sell in stores, but more importantly, the bumper harvest would strengthen his bees for their biggest task of the coming year.

Like most commercial beekeepers in the US, at least half of Arp’s revenue now comes from pollinating almonds. Selling honey is far less lucrative then renting out his colonies to mega-farms in California’s fertile Central Valley, home to 80% of the world’s almond supply. . . 

Why are limes so freakishly expensive in New Zealand? – Alex Braae:

It shouldn’t surprise anyone that limes get expensive while out of season. But they’re very, very, very expensive right now. Is there something more worrying going on? Alex Braae reports.

There’s nothing like a squeeze of lime juice to make the flavours of a guacamole sing, not to mention to make a mojito possible at all. Unfortunately, picking up a few limes for the purpose right now will probably break the bank.

Prices for the small green citrus fruit have shot up this summer to extreme new highs, with reports of a single kilogram costing as much as $80. That’s many times higher than prices at the peak of the growing season, in which a kilogram can often be bought for a single digit. . . 

A cheese themed hotel is opening in London this January – Alex Landon:

It’s the Hilton of Halloumi, the Radisson of Raclette – yes, it’s a cheese hotel right here in London! If, like me, you’re desperately trying to claw your way back to some healthy eating habits after a season of indulgence, then you might want to look away now.

For the world’s first cheese hotel is opening in the heart of Camden on January 29th, offering cheese fiends the chance to spend a night in the hotel of their dreams (dreams which will be extremely vivid if you scoff all that cheese, of course).

Much like a strong-smelling Stilton, the cheese hotel doesn’t exactly do subtle. The room is an eye-catching shade of yellow, which encompasses cheese-themed wallpaper, bedding, cushions, artwork, and giant cheese installations. There’s even more cheesiness beyond the decor, with cheese boardgames (it’ll be an absolute travesty if they don’t have Mousetrap) and cheese soap, which I’m frankly not sold on. . . 


Word of the day

January 12, 2020

Terraqueous – consisting or formed of land and water; relating to or living in both land and water.


Word of the day

January 11, 2020

Overslaugh – . to pass over or disregard by giving a promotion, position, etc., to another instead; bar or hinder; the passing over of one duty for another that takes precedence.


Sowell says

January 1, 2020


When a Child is Born

December 22, 2019


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