Word of the day

September 12, 2018

Tauwhirotanga – caring, kindness, compassion.

(It’s Maori Language Week).


365 days of gratitude

September 8, 2018

Whoever is careless with he truth in small matters can’t be trusted in important matters. – Albert Einstein.

Today I’m grateful for the people in my life who can be trusted with matters small and big.


Are you getting enough?

September 2, 2018

It’s World Iron Week – are you getting enough?

 

 


Rural round-up

September 1, 2018

Waimea dam project may be refloated – Cherie Sivignon:

The Waimea dam project may be refloated with a revamped funding model that lowers the estimated cost for ratepayers.

Tasman district councillors look likely to be asked at an extraordinary full council meeting on Thursday to change the “no” vote they made on Tuesday and instead, agree to proceed with the dam project.

However, the issue is scheduled to be discussed behind closed doors although the high public interest is recognised with time allowed in the public forum section of the meeting for people to speak for or against the project. . .

Van Leeuwens face sell-up threat – Annette Scott:

The stress of battling Mycoplasma bovis and trying to keep a multi-million dollar farm business afloat has hit hard for South Canterbury dairy farmers Aad and Wilma van Leeuwen.

The couple blame the Ministry for Primary Industries for the impact on their business as they now face the threat of having to sell farms because of what they see as MPI’s bungling of compensation. . .

Lynda Coppersmith appointed first female chief executive of NZ Young Farmers

A tech-savvy business leader with a passion for the primary industries has been appointed to the top job at NZ Young Farmers.

Lynda Coppersmith, 48, was one of a strong line up of candidates vying for the sought-after chief executive’s position.

“I’m really excited that I’m going to be working in the primary industries again,” she said. . .

LIC introduces world leading measures to combat M. Bovis:

LIC, the largest supplier of artificial breeding services to New Zealand’s dairy farms, is introducing daily testing of bull semen to combat the threat of the Mycoplasma bovis cattle disease.

The daily testing regime is part of a raft of new measures that LIC has put in place to help protect against the Mycoplasma bovis (M. bovis) outbreak and will give its 10,000 farmer customers additional reassurance this mating season. . .

Annabel Bulk announced as Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018:

Congratulations to Annabel Bulk who has become the Bayer Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018. Ms Bulk was representing Central Otago and is Assistant Viticulturist at Felton Road.

She is thrilled to have won this prestigious title and delighted that all her hard work over the last few years has paid off. She is very passionate about viticulture and has proved she has the skills and knowledge to become one of the New Zealand wine industry’s future leaders. Ms Bulk is delighted she will be taking the trophy back to Central Otago. This is only the second time it has been won by someone in this region – Nick Paulin won the competition in 2011. . .

Robotics Plus appoints CEO as demand grows for agricultural automation:

Robotics Plus, a New Zealand agricultural robotics and automation company, today announced it has appointed Dr Matt Glenn as the company’s chief executive officer. The move comes after a period of accelerated growth for Robotics Plus fuelled by industry demand for its innovative horticulture automation technologies.

“The company is growing strongly and is well funded, so now is the right time to add a professional chief executive to lead our high calibre team. We are very pleased to have attracted someone of Matt’s calibre, he brings over 20 years of experience in business management and the commercialisation of science and technology,” says Steve Saunders, Co-Founder and Chairman of Robotics Plus, who had held the role of Acting CEO. Mr Saunders will remain an Executive Director to focus on the strategy and establishment of a US subsidiary. . .

Agriculture gearing up for “fourth industrial revolution”:

The agricultural industry is gearing up for the “fourth industrial revolution”, where machines will be replacing humans in “thinking” as well as “doing” roles.

This is according to Andy Haldane, chief economist at the Bank of England, who spoke to BBC Radio 4 about the rise of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI).

Although Mr Haldane has predicted that up to 50% of all jobs could be lost to new technologies, in the next four decades agri-tech will need considerable investment before it can address the labour shortage in agriculture. . .

 

 


Rural round-up

August 26, 2018

NZAgbiz launches first electrolyte product:

Developed by NZAgbiz in conjunction with leading veterinary scientists, Novolyte has been formulated to replace fluids lost due to scouring, treat dehydration and exhaustion and help calves recover from stressors such as transportation.

NZAgbiz is a Fonterra business unit that manufactures livestock nutrition products using primarily Fonterra ingredients, and General Manager Greg Cate says Novolyte was the logical next step in their range of scientifically formulated animal health supplements.

“All NZAgbiz products are based on solid scientific evidence and we saw the need for a high-quality electrolyte replacement to help farmers raise calves that thrive,” says Cate. . . 

Farm plans reduce N loss:

Farming practices now piloted by Mid Canterbury dairy farmers Grant and Jan Early could show other New Zealand farmers how they can successfully reduce their environmental impacts.

Earlys’ Mayfield farm is one of a small group in the Forages for Reduced Nitrate Leaching project looking for ways to cut nitrogen losses.

They have so far achieved a 20% cut in one year on their dairy support farm. The research results are made available to help farmers adopt new practices. . .

Milking it: I”m a farmer and I’m a very lucky man: – Craig Hickman:

NZ is known for its dairy products, and is home to one of the biggest dairy companies in the world. In this Stuff special investigation, we examine how the price of milk is set and explore the industry behind our liquid asset.

OPINION: Someone recently asked me why I’m a farmer and I think it’s fair to say it was something of an accident; I don’t’ come from a farming background and I had only a vague notions of what it might be like having spent a few summer holidays working on a deer farm.

I broached the idea with my parents at the end of my sixth form year, saying I would like to skip my final year of college and go work on a dairy farm, ostensibly to earn enough money to put myself through university.

My father, ever the practical man, came back to me with a counter proposal; if the object of working for a year is to save money for university, why not do something that pays real money? . . 

Hill country going well – Peter Burke:

Beef + Lamb NZ director Kirsten Bryant is concerned about the perception that hill country farmers aren’t doing well. Bryant says she and her husband have three hill country farms and financially they have never done as well as they are doing now.

Their properties are returning 5% to 8% on capital. “I don’t know where this perception that hill country farming is not profitable has come from,” she told Rural News. “For a start, let’s not forget about hill country farms that this is where the lambs are bred.

So you start focusing on hill country farming as a negative and talking it down and soon you are going to lose your breeding ewes and total lamb production,” she says. . . 

First NZ company receives Medical Cannabis license:

Hikurangi Cannabis has become the first New Zealand company to secure a license to cultivate medicinal cannabis plants.

The license issued by the Ministry of Health enables Hikurangi to breed cannabis strains that can eventually be used in medicines.

Hikurangi has secured significant investment and will now start building high tech greenhouses and processing facilities near Ruatoria on the East Coast. Hikurangi has commissioned clinical trials to start next year for the first New Zealand made cannabis medicines. . .

A2 Milk reports an a1 result while scientists work on the health benefits – Point of Order:

Revenue up   68%, profit up 116% , cash  on hand up  280% …

Those annual results are the sort most  companies’ bosses  dream of.  They are certainly are the  kind  of  results  Fonterra’s  farmer-suppliers    are  not  likely  to  hear  from  the  co-op’s  board in  this lifetime.

But  for A2 Milk’s  shareholders  they are  real.   Reporting to shareholders  (who  indeed have had a  dream run  this year), the   company this week  said revenue  reached  $922.7m,  annual profit $195.7m,  and  the sales margin  was  31%,  up  from  26% . . 

NZ pipfruit industry heading for a record 2018 crop, MyFarm says – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s pipfruit industry is headed for a record crop this year as it benefits from favourable growing weather, low Northern Hemisphere stocks, market changes, premium varieties, and a weaker New Zealand dollar, according to a report published today by MyFarm Investments.

The vast majority of the 2018 apple crop has been picked and nearly 90 percent has been exported, said MyFarm head of investment research Con Williams, who joined New Zealand’s largest rural investment syndicator last month after eight years as ANZ Bank’s agri economist. Williams said the crop is expected to have increased by 5-6 percent from last year, registering a new all-time high. . . 

Red meat sector confident despite some headwinds – Allan Barber:

Since I attended the 2016 conference, having missed last year’s, several things have changed considerably: two years ago Donald Trump wasn’t President, Silver Fern Farms hadn’t concluded its capital raising with a Chinese investor, alternative proteins and non-meat burgers weren’t on the industry’s radar and there was little recognition of the need for a Red Meat Story.

This year the conference programme acknowledged these changes by focusing on disruption to global trade, the China influence, heightened consumer expectations, the effects of the digital revolution and the importance of building consumer trust by telling our story about product provenance, traceability and environmental credibility. The conference was very well attended by farmers, processors and service providers, all of whom were optimistic about meeting the challenges ahead of an industry which has faced many different threats to its survival in the past 140 years. . . 

Country Life rural wrap from around New Zealand:

Do you know what is happening on farms and orchards around New Zealand? Each week reporters from Country Life talk to rural people about what is happening around New Zealand. Here’s what they told us.

Northland
Younger cattle have been selling well coming into a spring market. An average-to-better yearling steer has been fetching $880 to $950 and decent heifers $800 to $860. Wednesday was one of the worst days this winter – cold and bleak with hail, thunder and lightning. Thursday was sunny and Friday sunnier.

Pukekohe
This weekend’s weather will be like the last – fine. Unfortunately, the work days have been wet. With few exceptions, growers have kept off their fields unless crops were ready to harvest. With heavy supplies of broccoli retailing at unprofitable prices, working in the rain and muddy fields would appear to be a waste of time. . .

Tariff turmoil in times of abundance – Tim Burrack:

U.S. crop export prices dropped like a rock last month, falling by more than 5 percent. That’s the fastest dive we’ve seen in seven years, according to a report issued on Tuesday by the Department of Labor.

Government figures are important for understanding trends, but they cover up a lot of individual stories.

So let me tell you what these export-price statistics have meant for my farm in Iowa, where I grow corn and soybeans and raise hogs. Or, to look at it another way, let me tell you about my farm’s financial snapshot.

We’re facing tariff turmoil in a time of abundance. . .

 

Cavalier turns to profit in 2018, sees continuing improvements in future years –  Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Carpet-maker Cavalier Corp turned to an annual profit and improved its debt and cash balances as it benefits from the previous year’s restructuring.

The Papatoetoe-based company posted a net profit of $4.1 million in the year ended June 30, from a loss of $2.1 million a year earlier. That’s above the top end of its forecast range of $3.7 million to $4 million. . . 


How to read a poem

August 24, 2018

Today is National Poetry Day:

National Poetry Day was established in 1997. A one-day national poetry event extravaganza, it is held on the fourth Friday of August each year.

From seasoned poets, to total newbies, to the simply-a-bit-curious, participants in Phantom Billstickers National Poetry Day 2018 — on Friday, 24 August — will have the opportunity to be touched by the magic and excitement of poetry, to get involved in the poetry community, and to discover New Zealand poets, share poems and explore and experience what poetry is all about. . . 

I love poetry.

With or without rhyme, the economy of words, the way a poem helps me understand something I feel when I haven’t the words to explain it myself, the poet’s ability to say something with what is left out as well as what is put in . . .

But how do you read a poem?

Dunedin poet, Diane Brown provides her answer to that question:

“How do you read a poem?” a woman asked as we aqua-jogged. Despite years of writing and reading poems and a degree in literature, I had no easy answer. My pool friend was talking of the poems in The Weekend Mix and in particular poems without the certainty of rhyme and meter that she was familiar with. Many modern poems have irregular lines and seem to follow no pattern. Where does the emphasis go, how do you know when to pause? And how do you interpret?

The Romanian poet, Paul Celan said: “A poem, as a manifestation of language and thus essentially dialogue, can be a message in a bottle, sent out in the -not always greatly hopeful – belief that somewhere and sometime it could wash up on land, on heartland perhaps. Poems in this sense, too are under way: they are making toward something.”

I find this a helpful way to think of a poem. A bottle lying on the sand. You pull out the paper and unfold it. It’s in hieroglyphics. Imagine the frustration. All you know is that you have received a message from far away. A person reaching out. To you. Maybe you have to live with the uncertainty, maybe you can find tools to help decipher. . . 

Interpreting a poem can require a consideration of sound, appearance, surface and underlying meanings, and more words than the poem itself. And it’s easy to beat the life out of them.

Dear Reader, I urge you to simply enter into a dialogue with the poem and listen to what it has to say. Even if you get a glimpse of understanding, in the same way as you communicate with speakers of other languages. That’s more than you had before. Don’t be afraid, keep an open mind and enjoy the meeting.

If you’re of a mind to meet some poetry, you will find some of Diane’s  at her website.


Quote of the day

August 20, 2018

Poetry is the revelation of a feeling that the poet believes to be interior and personal that the reader recognises as his own. Salvatore Quasimodo  who was born on this day in 1901.


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