Thugs’ veto wins again

October 17, 2019

Massey University hasn’t learned from the Don Brash deplatforming debacle:

Massey University has advised Speak Up For Women to find an alternative venue for its Feminism 2020 event. The University has received external advice on its health, safety and wellbeing obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015, and its duty of care to the University community, and has made the decision on these grounds.

The legal advice we have received is that cancellation of the event, as concluded by the report, is the only way to eliminate the risk to health and safety and to ensure that the University would not be in breach of its health and safety obligations.

Massey University is committed to the values of academic freedom, the freedom of speech, and the freedom of expression, as values that lie at the very heart of the tradition of a university and academic inquiry. However, this event has created significant disruption to our students, staff and University operations, and we cannot accept any further risk or issues, or any risk of potential harm that may impact upon a particularly vulnerable community.

When health and safety is used as an excuse, it’s the thugs’ veto winning again.

Who’s Speak Up for Women?

Speak Up For Women is a diverse group of ordinary New Zealanders who initially came together to campaign against the sex self-ID amendment being pushed through as part of the BDMRR Bill.

We found each other on social media, at political party events, through our work, and through friends.

We began with a shared concern about the impact of transgender politics (including self-ID) on the rights of women and girls, but now realise that there is no one advocating for women across the board. Traditional women’s groups now focus heavily on gender identity and what is left is a void of services and advocates for women. . .

A lot of people will share these concerns.

Some might be threatened by this but the answer is to use logic and facts provide a counter-argument, not to use the thugs’ veto to shut down those espousing them.

A media release from Melissa Derby who was to speak at the event says:

In September, Massey said it would host the Feminism 2020 despite objections, and that it was ‘committed to free speech as a fundamental tenet of a university’. It looked like Massey had learned from the public backlash against its cancellation of last year’s event with Don Brash.”

“Yet, as of today, Massey has shut down the event, seemingly due to pressure from a vocal group of activists. Today’s announcement reveals the University’s true position is one of absolute weakness. Massey says it values free speech while its actions prove the opposite.”

“Not only has the University refused to uphold its stated commitment to free speech, it is being deliberately vague about its reasoning. Massey cites health and safety concerns, but it’s completely unclear whether this refers to threats of protest, or concern over ‘harmful’ speech. This is the most feeble use of a ‘health and safety’ excuse we’ve seen at a university yet.”

“Whoever thought we’d see the day when feminism is on the banned list at a New Zealand University? Ironically, I was going to speak at this event on the dangers of identity politics and the need for people to talk to one another.”

“If a University’s default response to ‘any risk of potential harm’ is the cancellation of speech, then it ought to shut up shop. Universities have traditionally been a space for free expression, protest, and the contest of ideas. Massey has disgraced this tradition.”

A woman who planned to speak on the need for people to talk to one another, has been deplatformed by threats from people too scared to hear what she has to say.

 

 


Country’s going to town

October 11, 2019

50 Shades of Green says rural New Zealand has had a gutsful and is calling for the country to go to Wellington:

Conservation Group 50 Shades of Green is organising a provincial get-together in Wellington.

Chair, Andy Scott said the conservation group’s message needed to be told to a larger audience.

“The blanket planting of good farmland has reached crisis proportions. Add to that the water proposals, land use changes and the consistent campaign against rural businesses, we have a problem,” Andy Scott said.

“We’ll be telling our story to a city audience by coming to Wellington. The politicians aren’t listening to us so hopefully the general voters will.

“The meeting will be at 11am on Thursday 14th of November before marching to Parliament arriving at 1pm.

It isn’t just farmers coming to town but representatives of all of provincial NZ from farmers to bankers, stock agents to rural advocacy groups and suppliers though to real estate representatives.

“We’re expecting a good turnout of people from the provinces,” Andy Scott said.

All  50 Shades is asking for is a fair go :

OUR PURPOSE: To demonstrate and communicate that we will not be ridden over roughshod by a political agenda which shows no regard for genuine community wellbeing or genuine democratic consultation. The rural sector is being excluded from critical policy making decisions at the same time that anti farming lobbyists are being ushered in. We are calling the Government out. We deserve a level playing field and a fair go.

A FAIR GO. That’s all NZ Farming communities are asking for.

We are the men and women who grow your food. We work in the rain, sun, snow and wind to take care of this land, our animals and families.

We ask for a fair go on Emissions (Net ZCB) – We own land, which is  home to hundreds of thousands, even millions of trees and yet our emissions reductions targets are unnecessarily high and ‘gross’ while other emitters have ‘net’ targets which will be met by planting what remains of our farms and communities in trees. 

We ask for a fair go on Water Regulations.  We are custodians of vast waterways, a role we have embraced over the last 20 years and into which huge investments have been  made.   We were not properly consulted on the Freshwater Reforms.  None of our elected representatives were permitted at the table to provide a voice on our behalf.  Meanwhile environmental lobby groups were ushered in to share in the spoils of an unfettered political agenda. We need local solutions to local problems, and we need to be heard.

We ask for a fair go on Land Use Changes (ETS):  The Government never originally intended to return carbon credits to foresters for carbon sequestration, the forestry industry lobbied for over 6 years to achieve this outcome.  This artificial market for sequestered units will drive escalating afforestation by international and domestic investors at an unprecedented scale should the ‘free market’ be given its head and allowed to bolt onto our hills.  Our Communities are not carbon sinks, our people matter more than that.

We ask a fair go for Mental Health.  The Farmers of New Zealand and their families are being painted as environmental vandals by their own Government. The persistent focus on farming being a ‘problem’ is perpetuating the groundswell of disgusting behaviour targeting farmers and even their children by extremist activists intent on furthering their own agendas. This campaign against rural businesses and their families can not be ignored or worse, given credibility by the Government, or rural families will ultimately pay the price.

A lot of protests alienate people through disruption. 50 Shades is aiming for a more intelligent approach:

PROTEST GENERAL RULES: We are there to elevate our voices and present our concerns.  Please remember we are representing more than ourselves, we request respectful behaviour at all times.

They also have guidelines for signs:

Be creative with your signs, here’s some tips for effective sign creation:

    1. Have a clear message
    2. Use humour and wit
    3. Keep it simple
    4. Remember that presentation matters
    5. Be passionate
    6. No personal attacks 

And they’ve provided some good examples:

Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 1 Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 2
 Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 3  Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 4
 Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 5 Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 6
Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 7  >Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 8
  Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 9  Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 10  
Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 11  Save Our Farms (Protest Walk) 12
The gathering will start in Civic Square at 11am on Thursday November 14th.

The expression going to town means doing something enthusiastically or intensely.

The depth of feeling in rural New Zealand at the moment should ensure both feelings are well illustrated.


Word of the day

October 6, 2019

Aesculapian – relating to physicians or medicine; a qualified practitioner of medicine; a physician.


Morals prompt NZ First’s president’s resignation

October 4, 2019

Morals were the reason behind the sudden resignation of NZ First president Lester Gray:

New Zealand First party president Lester Gray has quit the party, citing his refusal to sign off financial reports for ‘moral’ reasons. 

A resignation letter reveals Gray took his stand against signing the party’s 2019 reports with a claim he has been kept in the dark over party expenditure and donations, leaving him unable to put his name to them with confidence. . .

In Gray’s resignation letter, obtained by Stuff, he raises issues around communication with senior party officials and uncertainty over financial dealings.

“I refuse to sign off the 2019 Financial Reports with the information I have been provided,” he wrote.

“As President, the limited exposure I have had to Party donations and expenditure leaves me in a vulnerable position.

“This type of operation does not align with my moral and business practice values, and I am therefore not able to support the Party any longer.”

Gray also stated there was “insufficient communication and support from senior members of the Party for me to effectively function as the President“. . .

Is anyone surprised?

A friend with shares in a race horse received a letter before the last election seeking a contribution towards a generous donation to New Zealand First.

Was any donation like this, or from fishing and forestry interests which benefit from its policies, declared? No, and time after time, this party is the only one in parliament that never declares any sizable donations.

It isn’t so much a party as a principality presided over by Winston Peters whose word is law.

NZ First presents an ongoing risk to our reputation for openness, transparency and, relatively, low rates of corruption.

It is a carbuncle on the hide of democracy. Dare we hope that this news might prompt someone to lance it?


Word of the day

September 22, 2019

Fortravailed – wearied by work; exhausted.


Rural round-up

September 21, 2019

New water policies will hobble farmers – Simon Davies:

Farmers are being hamstrung by well-meaning but poorly targeted regulation, writes Simon Davies of Otago Federated Farmers.

Today, while crutching my breeding rams, I was considering the latest policy package from central government.

To be fair there was not a lot of constructive thought undertaken, as this task is a fairly intense activity as those of you who have done it know. For those of you who have not, crutching rams (removing the wool around the tail and between the legs for hygiene purposes) is a bit like wrestling 80 to 100kg sacks of potatoes that fight back.

As I was struggling with a sore back, the term hamstrung came to mind. . .

How did farmers become public enemy number one? – Rachael Kelly:

Last November, Southland dairy farmer Jason Herrick contemplated taking his own life.

A wet spring had turned his farm to mud, his family was “going through some stuff” and anti-farming messages on social media all affected his self-worth.

They’re our number one export producers, an industry that was once seen as the proud back-bone of the nation.

But farmers are almost becoming ashamed of what they do because they’re being attacked from all fronts, Herrick says. . . .

No quick change to farm systems – Pam Tipa::

People don’t appreciate how difficult it is to change farm systems quickly, says Pāmu chief executive Steven Carden.

“They are difficult biological systems and people who are not in farming expect you to be able to switch on the new system overnight,” he told Dairy News.

“It takes a long time to get those changes right, to embed the new technologies in farm systems to make them work effectively. Farmers fundamentally are small business people who can’t risk their entire business with a big shift in how they operate one year to the next. . .

They like you – Luke Chivers:

Public perceptions of farming are more positive than farmers think, a survey shows.

“The strong theme we have heard from farmers in the past is that they do not feel well-liked by their urban counterparts. However, when you poll the general population, this is simply not true,” UMR research executive director Marc Elliot says.

UMR surveyed more than 1000 people last month and found the response at odds with the view held by many in primary industries. 

New Zealanders are almost five times as likely to hold a positive view of sheep and beef farming than a negative one, the research showed. . .

Tractor protest on Saturday – Hugh Stringleman:

Northland farmers have been asked to join a tractor protest over the costs and effects of Government regulations.

Protest organiser and dairy farmer Mark Dawson said the event will be on the southern side of Ruawai township in the Kaipara District between 11am and 1pm on Saturday.

It will be a symbolic protest aimed at what he believes will be the horrendous effects on farming of the proposed freshwater legislation.

Northland MP Matt King, National, has promised support along with Kaipara mayor and beef farmer Jason Smith. . .

ORC candidates quizzed on future of farming :

How do candidates standing for the Otago Regional Council see the future of farming in Otago? That question and others has been posed to all candidates by Southern Rural Life ahead of next month’s local body election. It is shaping up to be an interesting election, with 28 people vying for 12 positions.

All candidates were asked by Southern Rural Life to respond to the following questions and their responses are below (responses were not received from Matt Kraemer, Andrew Noone, Gail May-Sherman and Gordon Dickson)

Question 1
Why are you standing for council?

Question 2
How do you see the future of farming in Otago?

Question 3
Good management practice and improvements to some farming activities will be needed if Otago’s water aspirations are to be achieved. What approach to regulation and rules do you support and where do you think partnerships,  incentives and industry support might fit in (if at all)?

Question 4
Do you think there should be discretion for regional councils to determine local solutions for local issues or should a centralized response always apply instead? . . .

c


Full & final

September 20, 2019

The Ihumātao dispute is getting messier and government interference is to blame.

When it began, Mana Whenua had an agreement with Fletchers, who own the land.

Then, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern called a halt to any building while negotiations continued and now Mana Whenua have backed out of the agreement with Fletchers and are siding with the protesters in wanting the land back and she’s not ruling out buying it:

. . . But there was a breakthrough on Wednesday, with the Māori King announcing all mana whenua “want their land returned” and calling for the Government to negotiate with Fletchers “for the return of Ihumātao to its rightful owners”.

While National Party leader Simon Bridges quickly called for the Government to reject entering into such negotiations, Ardern is refusing to rule it out.

Speaking from Japan, Ardern said she was “incredibly grateful” for the work Kiingitanga had facilitated but wouldn’t say what action the Government would take. 

“There is still a bit more work to be done, but we will be mindful, as we go from here, of issues like Treaty precedent, the commercial interests, but also the heritage issues,” she said.

“At this stage, our focus is on picking up the good work that has been done by Kiingitanga.”

She wouldn’t discuss whether Auckland Council should be a party to negotiations with Fletchers, calling that speculative.

Bridges said on Wednesday that Fletchers legally owned the land and if the Government began negotiations, it could set a precedent.

“If this settlement is brought into question then so will all other full and final Treaty of Waitangi settlements,” he said. 

A spokesperson for Kiingi Tuuheitia said on Wednesday that the return of land was “outside of the Treaty of Waitangi settlement process” and called for an “innovative and modern solution that does not financially disadvantage iwi”.  . . 

The government buying the land off Fletchers is not an innovative and modern solution it would be the start of another, very expensive problem.

Treaty negotiations have always ruled out private land and been agreed as full and final.

Wrong was done all those years ago and the amount Iwi have got in settlement of its grievances is well below the value of what was taken, but that doesn’t alter the agreement nor can it open up a re-negotiation when the younger generation feel their elders didn’t get enough.

If the Iwi want to buy the land and Fletchers are willing to sell it there is no problem.

But if Fletchers don’t want to sell and/or the Iwi aren’t prepared to buy it but want the government to, there is a very big problem.

And while all this is going on, the building of the much-needed houses can’t start at great cost to the legal owners of the land.

The government’s interference has made matters worse and is yet another signal that it doesn’t understand and has no sympathy for business.


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