366 days of gratitude

12/09/2016

In Dunedin 10 days ago I tried to pay for lunch with my credit card. The transaction was cancelled.

I knew there was more than enough credit in the account so tried again. It was cancelled again.

I paid cash.

An hour or so later I tried to pay for a purchase at a shop with the credit card. It wouldn’t work.

I went to the bank, the teller put the card in the hole in the wall and got a message saying the chip was damaged.

She said that was happening to cards used to self-checkouts in supermarkets. That doesn’t make sense when the card thingees are the same as those at checkouts with staff but I didn’t argue with her.

She said the bank would send me a new card and that would take about seven working days.

I found the new card in the mail that had arrived when I was away at the end of last week when I got home yesterday and it worked at the supermarket where I used it for the first time today. I’m grateful for that and that being credit-cardless for 10 days wasn’t a problem because I know that for some people it would have been.


Word of the day

12/09/2016

Spheromancy – the making of determinations or predictions using questionable or unscientific means; divination using a crystal ball.


Dot test

12/09/2016

Can you pass the dot test?

You hit all the dots correctly which means that you have an incredible ability to understand what you see, analyze and calculate it immediately.
On top of that, you’re very patient when you need to be and that gives you the peace of mind to actually concentrate and reach the right conclusion instead of giving up and pick a random solution.
All these indicate that you’re officially smarter than most of the population. That’s pretty impressive and you should be proud of yourself. Woot woot!

It isn’t that hard if you can count.


Pascoe’s 2nd gold

12/09/2016

Sophie Pascoe set a world record when she won the 200 metre individual medley. This is her second gold  following her win in the 100 metre backstroke and silver in the 50 metre freestyle yesterday.

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New Zealand is now 11th in the medal tally with four gold, three silver and two bronze.

 


Rural round-up

12/09/2016

Shearing role an honour – Sally Rae:

Johnny Fraser has a busy few months ahead of him.

Mr Fraser, a North Otago farmer, has been selected as New Zealand team manager for a transtasman shearing test in Australia in October.

Next year, he is heading to the United Kingdom for nearly six weeks, to manage the New Zealand team.

Shearing has taken Mr Fraser around the world, yet he reckoned the appointment was the  highlight of a lengthy involvement in the sport. . . 

Hardest part out of the way – Hamish MacLean:

The North Otago Irrigation Company has not hit its target of a September 1 commissioning for all shareholders, but chief executive Robyn Wells says the work programme for its $57million expansion is now progressing well.

With a staged commissioning of lines, Mrs Wells said all farmers on the expanded scheme would have their water turned on before Christmas.

Installing the large 1200mm pipe making up the “main spine” of the expansion had been “the most difficult”, but was now complete.

Ten crews, or 138 workers, continued to work across a “significant area of North Otago”. . . 

Strong outlook for horticultural sector – Sally Rae:

An average price of $90 for a 17.5kg lamb is being picked by ANZ economists for 2016-17 — but there are down side risks from Brexit impacts.

The bank’s latest Agri Focus focused on the price outlook for New Zealand’s major agricultural sectors.

The expected environment still looked challenging for key livestock sectors, despite some expected improvement for the dairy industry.

In contrast, the main horticultural crops were on track to post near-record export volumes and still achieve solid prices.

It was a mixed outlook for sheepmeat prices. down side risks were possible due to Brexit impacts but on the positive side, tradeable supply was expected to tighten during New Zealand’s main production window. . . 

Nelson Honey’s sweet success with Rainbow Station lease :

Nelson Honey has bought Rainbow Station’s pastoral lease, securing long-term access to 8300-hectares of high country.

Managing director Philip Cropp said the 33-year lease, which was finalised at the end of August, was significant as it future-proofed its access to the high-country farm.

It would see the company increase hive numbers across the station from 600 to 800. The number was about a fifth of the total hives the company had out across the region, he said. . . 

Family puts cropping skills to good use on sheep and beef farm – Heather Chalmers:

The McLauchlan family has gone against the dairy flow to stock a Mid Canterbury farm with sheep and beef, writes Heather Chalmers.

When the McLauchlan family bought their Mid-Canterbury farm in 2011, they were starting with a clean slate.

There were no stock on the 430 hectare Glengyle when they purchased it, so the family initially relied on dairy support and crops to generate an income while they gradually built up sheep and beef numbers. They have since leased a neighbouring 300ha property. 

They bought Glengyle after selling their mixed cropping farm in North Canterbury to dairy interests. Don McLauchlan said they were keen to move to a sheep and beef area, and get away from irrigation and the intensive management it requires. . . 

Former All White Tim Brown gets $9.7m to expand shoe business – Chloe Winter:

A woollen footwear business founded by former All White Tim Brown has been given a multi-million dollar funding boost.

Brown’s company Allbirds originally launched in 2014 after successfully raising about $3.68 million through a global crowdfunding platform and a US investment fund.

On Thursday, the former Wellington Phoenix captain secured an additional US$7.25m (NZ$9.71m) from Maveron, a private equity fund established by Starbucks founder Howard Schultz. . . 

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The mooing of your cows/bulls at night are keeping my kids and family up late when they need to get up early for school. Please address this problem.


Third silver

12/09/2016

Cyclists Emma Foy and Laura Thompson won silver in the 3000 metre individual pursuit.

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That takes New Zealand to 13th place in the medal table with three golds, three silvers and two bronze medals.

(This is a correction of an earlier post in which I omitted her pilot Laura’s name).

 


Quote of the day

12/09/2016

Youth would be an ideal state if it came a little later in life. –  H.H. Asquith who was born on this day in 1852.


September 12 in history

12/09/2016

1213 Albigensian Crusade: Simon de Montfort, 5th Earl of Leicester, defeated Peter II of Aragon at the Battle of Muret.

1575 Henry Hudson, English explorer, was born (d. 1611).

1683  Austro-Ottoman War: Battle of Vienna – several European armies joined forces to defeat the Ottoman Empire.

1812 – Richard March Hoe, American engineer and businessman, invented the Rotary printing press, was born (d. 1886).

1814 Battle of North Point: an American detachment halted the British land advance to Baltimore in the War of 1812.

1818 – Richard Jordan Gatling, American inventor, invented the Gatling gun, was born (d. 1903).

1846 Elizabeth Barrett eloped with Robert Browning.

1847  Mexican-American War: the Battle of Chapultepec began.

1848  Switzerland became a Federal state.

1852  H. H. Asquith, Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, was born (d. 1928).

1857 The SS Central America sank drowning a total of 426 passengers and crew, including Captain William Lewis Herndon. The ship was carrying 13–15 tons of gold from the San Francisco Gold Rush.

1880 – H. L. Mencken, American journalist and critic, ws born (d. 1956).

1888 Maurice Chevalier, French singer and actor, was born (d. 1972).
1889 – Ugo Pasquale Mifsud, Maltese politician, 3rd Prime Minister of Malta, was born (d. 1942).

1897  Tirah Campaign: Battle of Saragarhi.

1897 – Irène Joliot-Curie, French chemist and physicist, Nobel Prize laureate, was born (d. 1956).

1898 – Alma Moodie, Australian violinist and educator, was born (d. 1943).

1902  – Marya Zaturenska, Ukrainian-American poet and author, was born (d. 1982).

1906 The Newport Transporter Bridge was opened by Viscount Tredegar.

1907 – Louis MacNeice, Irish poet and playwright, was born (d. 1963).

1910 Premiere performance of Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 8 in Munich (with a chorus of 852 singers and an orchestra of 171 players).

1913 Jesse Owens, American athlete, was born (d. 1980).

1914 – Forty three miners were killed in an explosion at Huntly.

1919  Adolf Hitler joined the German Workers Party.

1928 – Muriel Siebert, American businesswoman and philanthropist, was born (d. 2013).

1930  Wilfred Rhodes ended his 1110-game first-class career by taking 5 for 95 for H.D.G. Leveson Gower’s XI against the Australians.

1931 – Ian Holm, English actor, was born.

1933  Leó Szilárd, waiting for a red light conceived the idea of the nuclear chain reaction.

1940   An explosion at the Hercules Powder Company plant in Kenvil, New Jersey killed 51 people and injured over 200.

1942  RMS Laconia, carrying civilians, Allied soldiers and Italian POWs was torpedoed off the coast of West Africa and sankwith a heavy loss of life.

1942 First day of the Battle of Edson’s Ridge during the Guadalcanal campaign.

1943  – Michael Ondaatje, Sri Lankan-Canadian author and poet, was born.

1943  Benito Mussolini was rescued from house arrest on the Gran Sasso in Abruzzi, by German commando forces led by Otto Skorzeny.

1948 Invasion of the State of Hyderabad by the Indian Army on the day after the Pakistani leader Jinnah’s death.

1952 Gerry Beckley, American musician (America), was born.

1952 Strange occurrences, including a monster sighting,  in Flatwoods, West Virginia.

1958  Jack Kilby demonstrated the first integrated circuit.

1959  Premiere of Bonanza, the first regularly-scheduled TV programme presented in color.

1964 Canyonlands National Park was designated as a National Par

1966  Gemini 11, the penultimate mission of NASA’s Gemini programme.

1974  Emperor Haile Selassie of Ethiopia was deposed following a military coup by the Derg, ending a reign of 58 years.

1977 South African anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko was killed in police custody.

1979 Indonesia was hit by an earthquake that measures 8.1 on the Richter scale.

1980 Military coup in Turkey.

1981 Flour bombs ended the rugby test between the All Blacks and Springboks at Eden Park.

'Flour-bomb test' ends Springbok tour

1983  A Wells Fargo depot in West Hartfor,was robbed of approximately US$7 million by Los Macheteros.

1988  Hurricane Gilbert devastated Jamaica.

1990 The two German states and the Four Powers signed the Treaty on the Final Settlement With Respect to Germany in Moscow, paving the way for German re-unification.

1992  NASA launched Space Shuttle Endeavour on STS-47 which marked the 50th shuttle mission. On board were Mae Carol Jemison, the first African-American woman in space, Mamoru Mohri, the first Japanese citizen to fly in a US spaceship, and Mark Lee and Jan Davis, the first married couple in space.

1992 Abimael Guzmán, leader of the Shining Path, was captured by Peruvian special forces.

1994 Frank Eugene Corder crashed a single-engine Cessna 150 into the White House’s south lawn, striking the West wing and killing himself.

2001  Ansett Australia, Australia’s first commercial interstate airline, collapsed due to increased strain on the international airline industry, leaving 10,000 people unemployed.

2003 – In Fallujah, US forces mistakenly shot and killed eight Iraqi police officers.

2005  Hong Kong Disneyland opened.

2007 Former Philippine President Joseph Estrada was convicted of the crime of plunder.

2008 The 2008 Chatsworth train collision between a Metrolink commuter train and a Pacific Union Freight Train killed 25 people.

2011 – The 9/11 Memorial Museum opened to the public.

2014  – Oscar Pistorius was found guilty of the culpable homicide of his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp.

2015 – A series of explosions involving propane triggering nearby illegally stored mining detonators in the Indian town of Petlawad in the state of Madhya Pradesh killed at least 105 people with over 150 injured.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


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