Contradictions fuel frustration

September 5, 2019

Climate change is supposed to be this government’s nuclear moment.

More renewable energy generation  is consistent with that.

But the government has killed off the Waitaha River hydro scheme even though it had sign-off from the Conservation Department, Iwi, and local councils.

The government wants farmers to reduce methane emissions but the   National Environment Standard on Freshwater Management and rewritten National Policy Statement want more wetlands and wetlands produce methane.

The policy also wants to reduce E.coli in rivers but that pollution in several waterways, including the Kakanui River from which we get our drinking water is caused by seagulls. Those birds are protected and so can’t be moved.

Farmers are very concerned about today’s announcements and contradictory messages sent by measures like these fuel their frustrations.

 


Word of the day

September 5, 2019

Prorogation – the action of discontinuing a session of a parliament or other legislative assembly without dissolving it;  a formal mechanism to end a session of the UK parliament, normally lasting only a short time until proceedings begin again with a new Queen’s speech; extension of a commander’s imperium in ancient Rome.


Sowell says

September 5, 2019


Rural round-up

September 5, 2019

Time for a grownup conversation about gene-editing – David Hughes:

 In the late 1990s public scepticism cast genetic modification as “The answer to the question no-one was asking”. Today, the new technology of gene editing is emerging as a real option in facing some of our world’s biggest challenges in food production, medicine, conservation and climate change.

The Institute I lead, Plant & Food Research, has committed our science to helping New Zealand’s agri-food sector deliver the best quality foods from the world’s most sustainable production systems. We believe gene editing can help us meet that commitment. 

Today, Plant & Food Research breeds only 100 per cent GM-free fruit, vegetables and grains. We have never developed GM foods for commercial use and industry does not fund us to do so. Yet our discovery-focused teams routinely use gene technologies to further our knowledge. 

They’ve learned that gene editing can help us achieve our traditional breeding targets around sustainability and nutrition much faster. That means consumers get more healthy whole foods sooner.  . . 

Trees debate ratchets up – Colin Williscroft:

Large swathes of agricultural land need not be planted in trees for New Zealand to meet its greenhouse gas emissions targets, NZ’s largest carbon farmer says.

In presenting NZ Carbon Farming’s submission to the Environment Select Committee on the Zero Carbon Bill, company founder and managing director Matt Walsh was questioned by MPs who said they had been told by officials that 30% of NZ’s agricultural land will need to be planted in trees to meet the Bill’s carbon dioxide emissions target of zero by 2050.

Walsh said he has heard the 30% figure before and is puzzled where it came from. He does not believe it is correct.

NZ Carbon Farming has asked officials how they got the number but has not had a definitive answer. . . 

Shear happiness for young women – Yvonne O’Hara:

”Shearing is an art.”

So says Ariana Te Whata, of Mossburn, who was taking part with three other young women in a course run by Elite Shearer Training on the Dowling family’s farm near Gimmerburn last week.

Three of the women, Tatjiana Keefe, of Raupunga, Cheyenne Howden, of Feilding, and Ariana work for Dion Morrell Shearing. They all intend to go shearing full time.

Ariana grew up in a shearing shed and her parents, Vanessa and Mana Te Whata, are shearing contractors and run Shear Tech. Mr Te Whata is a champion competitive shearer.

”I love shearing,” Ariana said.

”I love the art of it and it is beautiful to watch. . . 

Promoting eucalypts– David HIll:

Gary Fleming’s efforts to advocate for the value of eucalyptus trees has been recognised.

The North Canterbury farmer was named South Island Farm Forester of the Year at the New Zealand Farm Forestry Association conference held in Rotorua.

‘‘It’s a good award to get, as it takes a fair bit of dedication,’’ Mr Fleming said.

‘‘There’s a lot of people in the South Island who grow trees and anybody in farm forestry can apply for it.’’

The North Canterbury branch chairman was nominated by his branch committee earlier this year, after missing a meeting due to illness. . . 

Food tourism helps farmers survive – Tim Fulton:

A group of Queensland farmers is making the most of food tourism, proving town and country can work in harness for culinary satisfaction.

Maleny calls itself a hinterland town though, by Australian standards, it’s only a skip from the big smoke.

Perched on the Blackall Range, about 40 minutes from Sunshine Coast beaches, the area catches day trippers on Queensland’s hinterland tourist drive. . . 

 

Love lamb week to encourage better use of carcase :

Yorkshire farmer’s daughter and Great British Menu chef Stephanie Moon is calling on chefs to make better use of the lamb carcase as the country prepares for Love Lamb Week.

The annual campaign, commencing from the 1st of September to the 7th, aims to change perceptions of when to eat lamb.

It highlights that the highest volume of UK product is actually available during the last six months of the year, despite many consumers typically choosing to enjoy lamb around Easter time.

The National Sheep Association (NSA) will be involved in the industry-wide campaign, alongside AHDB Beef & Lamb and other UK levy bodies. . . 

 


Be ovarian cancer aware

September 5, 2019

The symptoms of ovarian cancer are vague and can be mistaken for other, less serious conditions.

Know your body and learn the symptoms.

Every woman and those who care about them should know the symptoms.

If they persist for more than two weeks, you should see a doctor.

Ovarian cancer isn’t detected by a smear test. It affects one in 75 women.


KiwiBuild failed

September 5, 2019

The government’s KiwiBuild reset is an admission of how flawed the policy was in the first place.

The 10,000 houses it said it would build wasn’t a target, it was a figure plucked out of the air, completely distanced from reality.

Worse than the unrealistic number, was the money wasted on houses no-one wanted to buy and houses sold to people who should not have been beneficiaries of taxpayer assistance.

Now Housing MInister Megan Woods has announced another plan, with no targets, which includes selling the houses no-one wanted – almost certainly to be a win for the buyers and a lose for the public.

There’s also a government backed low equity scheme that sounds horribly like the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac scheme in the USA that precipitated the Global FInancial Crisis.

The Taxpayers’ Union points to the potential  dangers that poses to taxpayers:

Replacing KiwiBuild with easy credit policies for first home buyers places significant risk on taxpayers, says the New Zealand Taxpayers’ Union. 

Taxpayers’ Union Economist Joe Ascroft says “The American housing crash and ensuing Global Financial Crisis was driven in part by the American Government’s decision to offer subsidized mortgages to low income households, who then failed to meet debt repayments when interest rates increased. Our Government’s decision to adopt a similar approach by offering taxpayer-backed mortgages to households who can only scrape together a 5 percent deposit is an uncomfortable echo to those easy credit policies which induced a housing crash overseas.”

“If households on ultra-low deposits ever failed to meet repayments due to rising unemployment or interest rates, either taxpayers or the banking system would be put under significant pressure.”

“Of course, the best approach to housing unaffordability isn’t to load on more debt and subsidies – which will inevitably push housing prices higher – but to enact meaningful supply-side reform. Allowing our cities to become more dense and removing the rural-urban boundary would be good places to start.”

The new policy, like many of this government’s lack details and the Minister’s repeated “we’ll build as many as we can as quickly as we can” is no substitute for a target tand a concrete plan to get there.

The root of the housing problem is simply one of supply not keeping up with demand, this hasn’t been helped by Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s calling a halt to development at Ihumātao.

The solution is more houses, faster which requires sorting out the infrastructure restraints, regulations that make the consent process so long and costly, and building here so much more expensive than in many other countries.

Anything which gives people more money without increasing the supply of houses will only make them more expensive.

KiwiBuild failed because it didn’t deal with the underlying causes of the problem and the so-called reset will do very little, if any, better.

We’d all benefit if the government set about addressing the constraints on supply rather than throwing more taxpayers’ money at policies that will benefit a relatively few people at considerable cost and risk to all of us.


Quote of the day

September 5, 2019

Whoever you pretend to be, you must face yourself eventually. – Al Stewart who celebrates his 74th birthday today.


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