Rural round-up

10/03/2021

Ongoing disruptions hit processors – Neal Wallace:

Disrupted shipping schedules, labour shortages and dry conditions in parts of the country are starting to hamper meat processing capacity as the season reaches its peak.

The shortage of labour and a squeeze on cold storage space is limiting the ability of companies to work overtime and also forcing further reduced processing of cuts.

“We have adjusted our cut mix in some plants to speed up product flow, but conversely this means we lose the higher-value small cuts, which will ultimately be reflected in the pricing schedule,” Silver Fern Farms chief executive Simon Limmer told shareholders in a newsletter.

AgriHQ analyst Nicola Dennis says a shortage of skilled workers means processors have had to stop producing premium-earning boneless, tubed shoulders for Japan, instead selling bone-in shoulders to China at lower prices. . .

Dealing with disappointment – Nigel Beckford:

The cancellation of iconic events like Golden Shears and the Southland A&P Show due to Covid alert level changes highlights the need for rural communities to stick together and have a plan B.

The 61st Golden Shears, which were scheduled to be held in Masterton this week, have been cancelled for the first time in their history. A huge disappointment, not just for the 300 plus competitors, but also for the many rural families who look forward to the event each year.

“It was a huge thing,” says Mark Barrowcliffe, President of the NZ Shearing Contractors Association. He was a judge at last year’s competition and intended to compete at this one.

Our shearing community was only just getting used to being able to catch up again with each other after so many shearing sports events were cancelled last year. So it was a huge disappointment to have the goalposts pulled up again.” . .

Awareness about ovarian cancer is much needed:

A greater awareness of ovarian cancer amongst women and health professionals is much needed says Rural Women New Zealand.

“Ovarian cancer kills more women per year in New Zealand than the road toll, with one woman dying every 48 hours from it, and its not talked about, we need to change this,” says National President Gill Naylor.

“Women present to health services, on average, four or five times before diagnosis is made and 85% of those diagnosed, are diagnosed in the later stage of the disease when options for care are minimal and survival is unlikely – this is not good enough.

“Early detection is possible the signs and symptoms are known and can be as simple as a blood test and in our view, it is vital to build awareness of symptoms through education campaigns for both the general public and health professionals.

“A cervical smear does not detect ovarian cancer and there is a need for a screening programme, timely access to testing for women with symptoms, improved access to approved therapies and clinical trials, and dedicated funding for research. . . 

NZ grown grain project paying off – Annette Scott:

An industry drive to increase the use of New Zealand-grown grain is taking off.

In a project started in 2017, the arable industry has been working towards increasing the use of NZ-grown grain through heightening consumer and end-user awareness of the benefits in using locally grown grain.

Wheat is the specific target.

Wheat production has bumped up by 40,000 tonne over the past three harvests and with this season’s milling wheat harvest showing promising signs, the project is on track. . . 

Kiwifruit growers join foodbank drive :

New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc. (NZKGI), the industry body which advocates for 2,800 growers, is encouraging its members to pitch in and donate to the most vulnerable through The Foodbank Project.

The Foodbank Project is a joint partnership between Countdown, the Salvation Army, and Lucid.

The drive recognises that Covid-19 continues to have an economic impact upon New Zealand with many kiwis struggling financially. . .

First Step – Mike Bland:

Farm ownership has always been a goal for Jared Baines. Now he is on track to achieving that goal much sooner than expected.

Jared, 30, grew up on two King Country sheep and beef farms owned by his parents Chris and Lynda, but after finishing school he left home to work on other farms.

He says his parents, who own Waikaka Station near Matiere, had always encouraged their children to make their own way in the world. They instilled their offspring with a strong work ethic and taught them the importance of saving money.

Like his siblings, Jared reared calves on Waikaka and used the proceeds from this and other work to buy a rental property that could later be used as a deposit on a home or farm. . . 

Farmers to get paid for planting trees in new biodiversity pilot – Jamieson Murphy:

FARMERS in six regions across the nation will have the opportunity to get paid to plant mixed-species trees on their property, under a new government trial program.

Farmers can already participate in carbon markets under the Emissions Reduction Fund, but the new Carbon+Biodiversity pilot will try a new approach that will also see the government pay farmers for the biodiversity benefits they deliver.

Participates will get paid for the first three years of the trial and will earn carbon credits for at least 25 years, which they can sell to the government or to private buyers. . . 


Sign to save lives

17/02/2021

Last night I saw a tweet from a woman saying she had just lost a beautiful friend to ovarian cancer.

Then I saw this one:

I understand and am sympathetic to the concern about conversion therapy but how can a petition on that issue that will affect a very few people gain so much more support than this one that affects so many?

Petition request

That the House of Representatives urge the Government to support the development of ovarian cancer (OC) awareness/education campaigns for the public and health professionals; ensure women with OC symptoms have timely access to testing; improve access to approved therapies and clinical trials; and dedicate funding to OC research.

Petition reason

Ovarian cancer (OC) kills more women per year than the road toll. There is no screening test. In NZ the majority of women can’t name a single symptom before diagnosis. There are significant barriers to access detection tests. NZ survival is 5% less than Australia (Au)—NZ has far fewer funded drugs and clinical trials. Breast cancer survival is more than double OC. Au/Canada/US have dedicated OC research, we fund almost none. Supported by Cure Our Ovarian Cancer, OCANZ, Talk Peach and NZGCF.

Why does this petition deserve and need much more support?

The woman in the first tweet is one of three or four New Zealanders who will die of ovarian cancer this week; one of the +/- 182 the disease will kill this year.

That’s more than will die as a result of road accidents.

The government spends about $1 billion a year on road safety improvements and most years nothing at all on raising awareness of ovarian cancer, improving access to tests, treatments and clinical trials, or research.

Because of that the eight or 10 New Zealand women diagnosed with the disease this week and every week will find their survival rate is no better than it would have been decades ago.

One reason for that is that many are diagnosed late because they didn’t know the symptoms and often their doctors mistake it for other less serious conditions.

Another is that for years there has been little or no research to find better treatments and eventual cures.

That will change if the petition is acted on.

The petition is fronted by more daughter and supported by four gynaecological cancer organisations – Cure Our Ovarian Cancer, Ovarian Cancer NZ,  Talk Peach and the NZ Gynaecological Cancer Foundation – and it is non-partisan.

Ovarian cancer doesn’t care about politics and it doesn’t discriminate. It strikes women of any age or ethnicity and it kills them.

It will keep killing them unless there is increased awareness of the symptoms, better access to testing, treatments and trials and a lot more research.

Please sign the petition and share this link to encourage family, friends, work mates . . . everyone you know to sign too: https://www.parliament.nz/en/pb/petitions/document/PET_99389/petition-of-jane-ludemann-for-cure-our-ovarian-cancer

P.S.

This isn’t intended to dissuade anyone from supporting the other petition – it’s not either/or.


Cancer isn’t cancelled

08/05/2020

Covid-19 has cancelled many things but cancer isn’t cancelled.

It’s World Ovarian Cancer Day.

  1. A Pap test (cervical smear test) does not detect ovarian cancer
  2. Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed at a late stage
  3. Diagnosing Ovarian cancer before it spreads makes it much more treatable
  4. Symptom awareness might lead to quicker diagnosis
  5. Common symptoms include:
    a. Persistent bloating
    b. Difficulty eating
    c. Feeling full quickly
    d. Pelvic/abdominal pain
    e. Urinary symptoms

 

Around one in 70 New Zealand will be diagnosed with the disease this year.

Around one in 1,000 will, like my daughter Jane, have the rare subtype low grade serous ovarian cancer that disproportionately strikes younger women.

 

You can learn more at: cureourovariancancer.org

Follow Cure Our Ovarian Cancer on Facebook and  Twitte and Instagram.

Jane’s personal blog is janehascancer.com

 


Be ovarian cancer aware

05/09/2019

The symptoms of ovarian cancer are vague and can be mistaken for other, less serious conditions.

Know your body and learn the symptoms.

Every woman and those who care about them should know the symptoms.

If they persist for more than two weeks, you should see a doctor.

Ovarian cancer isn’t detected by a smear test. It affects one in 75 women.


Please sign the petitions

04/05/2019

Eight health groups are combining to seek more funding for Pharmac to fund drugs that extend lives or improve their quality.

They’re urging people to sign their petitions:

A range of health groups are calling on members of the public to sign petitions that will presented to Parliament on 7 May. They call for medicines to be funded that will help New Zealanders live longer, healthier lives and reduce extreme suffering.

“We need kiwis to support other kiwis who often can’t stand up for themselves because they are too unwell,” Breast Cancer Aotearoa Coalition committee member Louise Malone says.

“This is a real opportunity for people to say to the Government that the time for proper funding of medicines is now.”

The groups will march to Parliament, starting at Wellington Library then to PHARMAC for a candle lighting ceremony in commemoration of those who have gone before. Once they reach Parliament, the petitions will be accepted by MPs.

The petitions call for dramatically improved medicines funding to provide the care that people with a range of serious illnesses need.

“The medicines are desperately needed,” Lung Foundation New Zealand CEO Philip Hope says.

“If everyone knew the suffering that people go through with these diseases, most wouldn’t hesitate to sign the petitions.”

The groups are Lung Foundation New Zealand, Breast Cancer Aotearoa Coalition, Ovarian Cancer New Zealand, Myeloma New Zealand, Pompe New Zealand and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia Advocates New Zealand.

 

No photo description available.

Image may contain: text

Among the charities involved is Ovarian Cancer New Zealand.

Each year in New Zealand 350 women are diagnosed and 220 die from ovarian cancer. It’s the second biggest contributor to women’s cancer deaths from female specific cancers. Approximately one in 70 women will develop it in their lifetime.

New Zealand women with the disease don’t get access to the same drugs that are funded in other countries.

This is the motivation for a petition asking  Pharmac to fund Lynparza and Avastin for ovarian cancer, and also urging the Minister of Health to provide additional funding to Pharmac to enable the drugs to be subsidised.

Each year [in New Zealand] 350 women are diagnosed and 220 die from ovarian cancer. It’s the second biggest contributor to women’s cancer deaths from female specific cancers. In women with ovarian cancer linked to the BRCA gene, Lynparza can extend progression free survival by about one year and is reimbursed by Governments in Australia, UK, and most OECD countries. In women with advanced disease Avastin extends PFS by 6 months. . . 

Ovarian cancer is often diagnosed late because the symptoms aren’t recognised.

Every woman, and those who care about them, should familiarise themselves with the symptoms.

Potential symptoms of ovarian cancer include:

  • Bloating
  • Abdominal/back/pelvic pain
  • Eating less and feeling fuller
  • Needing to pee more often or urgently
  • Bowel changes
  • Fatigue
  • Indigestion
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding
  • Painful intercause 
  • Unintentional weight loss

If women experience these for two weeks or longer they should tell their doctor. Ovarian cancer is detected with a blood test (CA-125) and ultrasound. 

The petition for better funding to treat ovarian cancer is here.

The other petitions are:

Breast cancer

Chronic lymphocytic leukemia

Lung cancer and Non small cell lung cancer

Myeloma

Multiple myeloma

Pompe disease

These organisations have recognised that insufficient money it the major reason Pharmac doesn’t fund treatments available in other countries which is why they’re asking that more is allocated.


Cancer doesn’t just come in pink

04/02/2019

It’s World Cancer Day.

Women, and those who care about them, must remember cancer doesn’t just come in pink.

Ovarian cancer isn’t detected by smears.

Symptoms can include:

abdominal bloating/swelling, abdominal/back/pelvic pain, change in bowel function, urinary frequency or urgency, eating less and feeling fuller, indigestion, unintentional weight loss, painful intercourse, fatigue and abnormal vaginal bleeding. If these symptoms are new, unusual or worsening and last for more than two weeks it is important to see a doctor, and keep seeing a doctor until you get a diagnosis.


World Ovarian Cancer Day

08/05/2018

Today is World Ovarian Cancer Day.

Each year on May 8th, women living with ovarian cancer, their families and supporters, along with patient advocacy organizations from around the world, come together to raise awareness about ovarian cancer. World Ovarian Cancer Day (WOCD) is the one day of the year we all raise our voices in solidarity across the world in the fight against this disease. . .

Ovarian cancer has the lowest survival rate of all female cancers. Most women are diagnosed once the cancer has already spread, making it more difficult to treat. There are often delays in diagnosing ovarian cancer. That is because there is no early detection test, and symptoms are often confused with symptoms of other less severe illnesses, particularly gastrointestinal complaints.

Five-year ovarian cancer survival rates vary around the world, ranging from 30% to 45%. By comparison, five-year survival rates for women with breast cancer range from 80% to 90%.

Ovarian cancer is overlooked and underfunded – yet every woman in the world is at risk of developing this disease.

You can find more about WOCD on Facebook and Twitter

And more about the disease at Ovarian Cancer New Zealand which lists the symptoms:

The most common symptoms of ovarian cancer are:

Bloating/abdominal (tummy) swelling

Eating less and feeling fuller

Pain in your abdomen/pelvis/back

Needing to pee more often (or leaking)

Other symptoms you might also experience include:

 Bowel changes  Indigestion  Painful Intercourse  Fatigue  Unusual Weight Loss  Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding

Remember, symptoms can be vague and easy to ignore so listen to what your body is telling you and then discuss this with your doctor

Image may contain: 14 people, people smiling

Ovarian cancer kills one woman in New Zealand every 48 hours.

Early detection improves outcomes.


%d bloggers like this: