Environmental politics responsible for Zika?

February 11, 2016

The World Health Organisation has declared the Zika virus is a public health emergency.

It is carried by mosquitoes and Dr Jacqueline Rowarth lays the blame for them on the DDT ban:

Emotion transcends evidence; fears transcend facts; anti-science is on the rise. . . 

In 1962 Rachel Carson’s book Silent Spring hit the shelves.

The American Council on Science and Health describes the book as “lyrical but scientifically flawed – arguing eloquently but erroneously that pesticides, and especially DDT, were poisoning the environment and also endangering human health.” . . .

But emotion and politics trumped the science.

Banning DDT was a political move. It has been claimed as the first major victory for the environmentalist movement in the US.

During its use between 1940 (when its insecticidal properties were discovered) and 1972, DDT was estimated to have saved more lives than any other man-made chemical.

Particular efficacy in the malaria battle has been recorded. In tropical regions the prevalence of malaria-infected people decreased from approximately 70% in the late 1950s, to 5% in the mid 60s. But by the mid 1980s cases infection was over 50% again.

The US Agency for International Development has stated that malaria would have been 98% eradicated had DDT continued to be used. . . 

Forty-four years from the banning of DDT, the lines of sad women in hospitals in Brazil, with their microcephalic babies in their arms or still in utero, have etched themselves into memory.

People are wondering whether the scientifically-proven use of DDT could have prevented this tragedy. Both the emotion and the evidence have been presented globally on screen; fears and facts are inter-linked.

A positive future depends on correct interpretation of scientific research, and good communication of the research implications. Real victories require an apolitical approach, whatever the topic.

This isn’t the first time that environmental politics and emotion have trumped science but it could be one of the costliest in human terms because of the severity of the birth defects Zika virus causes and the number of people affected by them.


Making money from fresh air

February 9, 2016

A keen photographer travelling through Europe kept waiting for a really clear day for scenic shots until he realised that Europe doesn’t do clear days the way New Zealand does.

While air quality deteriorates in some towns and cities in winter, on fine days in most places we generally have clear views and fresh air that people from other more heavily populated and industrialised countries can only dream of.

We’ve often joked that if only we could bottle it we could make a fortune but now that might not be a joke:

The idea of buying crisp, country air in a jar has proved popular in heavily-polluted cities such as Beijing and Shanghai.

In fact, people are paying upwards of $170 for a single container of air.

Leo De Watts from Britain has jumped on the bandwagon; selling jars of air collected from locations like Yorkshire, Somerset and Wales.

He describes Welsh air as having a “morning dew feel to it” with “vibrant and flavoursome undertones” while air originating from Somerset has “unblemished qualities”.

Setting off with a car full of empty jars at 5am, the team “harvests” air in large nets and seals it in the glass jars before shipping it across the world.

Mr De Watts, 27, said he had sold 180 bottles of such luxury air since his business started up just a few weeks ago.

However his company is not the first to put a price on oxygen.

Last year, a Canadian start-up which began selling plastic bags of air as a joke on eBay, realised there was a real market for the product when the air sold for $230.

The company then began bottling air from the Rocky Mountains and selling it in China for 100 Yuan ($NZ23) – 33 more times expensive than a bottle of water – but apparently a fraction of the price of British air. . .

If northern hemisphere air sells for that much, how much would fresh New Zealand air be worth?


Give by choice not compulsion

February 8, 2016

Out staff gave us a voucher for two nights at Awaroa Lodge for our 25th wedding anniversary.

It’s in Abel Tasman National Park and not somewhere you go by accident so it took us a while to redeem it but it was well worth the wait.

New Zealand is blessed with many areas of outstanding natural beauty and this is one of the gems – native bush, white sand, clear blue sea and, at least while we were there, sky to match.

The bay is in the news because two Christchurch men, Duane Major and Adam Gard’ner are crowdfunding through Givealittle to buy the privately owned beach and give it to the government.

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says the beach will become part of the Abel Tasman National Park if the campaign to buy it succeeds.

“I have instructed Department of Conservation officials to formally talk to the campaigners about the legal details of making this beach a part of the Abel Tasman National Park,” Ms Barry says.

“This campaign has struck a deep vein of public support, with more than 11,000 backers so far, and it’s been encouraging to watch the Givealittle fund grow.

“I’m able to give an assurance that if it succeeds the land will be added to Abel Tasman National Park and free access secured for the public in perpetuity.”

“It is a testament to the deep and abiding love New Zealanders have for their natural heritage, and to see people raising money and wanting to be actively involved in what happens to our land is inspirational. I congratulate the organisers of the campaign and wish them all the best in their efforts.” 

She also said:

The Department of Conservation had considered buying the land after it was offered to them before it was advertised, but decided it was too expensive, said Barry.

“The Government doesn’t have untold resources to buy beaches and pieces of bush. Every budget is under pressure.”

She said they did not want to drive prices up at this stage either.

“Sometimes people can see huge dollar signs. So our presence might be an encouragement to people to think the price of this property will go through the roof.”

However due to the “depth and extent” of public interest, Barry said her conservation officials were looking at helping out. . .

So far so very good but then along comes Andrew Little who said the government should step in now and provide the rest of the money.

To the credit of those behind the campaign that isn’t their preferred option:

. . . Mr Major said that though central government contribution would be welcome, he would rather see the money raised entirely by the public.

“People could raise it sooner, actually, and that speed with which we can raise that money will make a huge difference to how we arrange a tender, and arrange a whole bunch of things.

“That would be Plan A and always was Plan A – just reviving that get up and go spirit.” . . 

Why is Labour’s default always taxpayers? Why isn’t he encouraging people to give, starting with his caucus, with taxpayers funding only a last resort?

Instead we have the stark difference – asking people to give voluntarily as those behind the campaign are and demanding we give compulsorily through our taxes as Little is.

Individuals and businesses giving a little with taxpayer top-up only if it’s needed is a far better way than Labour’s usual mode of taxpayers’ giving a lot.

P.S. I have put my money where my mouth is and donated.

 

 

 

 


Rural round-up

February 4, 2016

Federated Farmers welcomes TPP signing:

 

Federated Farmers welcomes today’s signing in Auckland of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement as a significant milestone for the New Zealand economy and a positive deal for the agriculture sector.

Federated Farmers President Dr William Rolleston says the agreement may not have delivered everything the sector desired, but the scale and its importance to New Zealand is undoubtedly profound.

“As a founding member, the signing of the latest TPP agreement introduces another chapter in our proud history as a trading nation,” he says.

“For the primary sector, the TPP offers diverse opportunities not only for agriculture but for future generations of New Zealanders and their prosperity. You only have to look at the current state of dairy prices to realise the vital importance of opening up new export markets and ensuring a level playing field for New Zealand exporters. . . 

Quota allocations suggest change in balance of industry power – Allan Barber:

The release of the 2016 quota allocation which Alan Williams analysed in detail (Farmers Weekly 11th January) show some considerable shifts in tonnage entitlements between the major meat exporters. The quota is allocated as a percentage of the total allowable quota for shipment to the EU for sheepmeat and USA for beef during a calendar year; in the last two years New Zealand has only filled around 75% of the EU quota and 90% and 98% of the USA beef quota.

This shortfall, especially for sheepmeat, has been a result of the lower lamb kill, economic conditions in Europe and the availability of China as an alternative market eager for product at a competitive price. In 2014 China also took large quantities of beef. . . 

Cattle operated drinking trough:

A new trough that allows cows to pump their own water as they drink could be the answer to keeping stock out of the country’s rivers and lakes, a company says.

Beef cattle roaming in waterways] have hit the headlines in the past week.

Veterinary equipment company Shoof International, which is the importer of the new pump, says it could offer a solution.

Company group sales manager John Stubbs said because it was operated by the animals there was no need for electricity or other mechanical means.

The pump could supply enough water for up to 50 stock. “[It ] operates from the animal’s nose actually pushing on a lever as they drink water from the bowl. . . 

A2 cows are the future – Keith Woodford:

Towards the end of 2015 there was a massive re-assessment of A2 milk on the New Zealand and Australian stock exchanges. The shares of ‘The a2 Milk Company’ (abbreviated hereafter to their NZX code of ATM) closed the year at almost four times their price back in May, and with market capitalisation at $NZ1.35 billion.

For a few heady hours the capital value was close to 1.7 billion – more than Trade Me and almost double The Warehouse. Since then the shares have settled back somewhat, but still showing a three-fold gain from 12 months earlier.

In essence, the drive was fuelled by several major Australian institutional investors building their stakes, and then hundreds of smaller investors climbed on board. This was in response to ongoing good news stories from ATM, based on sky rocketing sales of infant formula in Australia and China, with this news particularly well reported in the Australian media. . . 

Fishing for a complimentary use of fire reservoir ponds – Peter Kerr:

Years ago for a farm management report at Lincoln University, I wrote a tongue-in-cheek plan around the integration of goldfish in troughs on dairy farms (we’d spotted the use of such technology to help keep the troughs clean).

Well here’s a huge expansion on this idea, one that’s taken my fancy…this time utilising water ponds kept on hand by forestry companies in case they ever need to fight a fire.

(Check out the story here in last year’s Otago Daily Times)

Ernslaw One started with an experiment in one of its Maniototo forest ponds, growing koura, or freshwater crayfish, and it has been such a success, it is going to expand the programme around some of its 2000 ponds spread throughout Southland and Otago.  . . 

New Zealand wine industry financial metrics remain sound:

Financial benchmarking survey shows industry resilience

The New Zealand wine industry continues to show sound financial metrics in 2015 on the back of profitability in all but the smallest wineries and stable or increased gross margins across the board, according to the tenth annual financial benchmarking survey released today by Deloitte.

Vintage 2015 tracks the financial results of wineries accounting for nearly 40% of the industry’s total wine production by volume. Survey respondents have been categorised into bands according to revenue to assist comparison within the industry. . . 

Help cows chill out this summer:

With the current El Niño weather pattern bringing heatwave conditions to many parts of the country, it’s important to ensure cows avoid heat stress and closely monitor cow health.

As temperature and humidity levels rise this summer, farmers should take steps to ensure stock stay cool and where necessary put in place a plan help prevent facial eczema.

“These conditions also encourage facial eczema, so farmers are reminded to monitor spore levels in your area, talk to your vet and put in place a prevention plan to suit your farm situation.”

“When it comes to high temperatures this summer, put simply a cool cow is a happy cow,” says DairyNZ animal welfare team manager Chris Leach. . . 

Farmers looking for environmentally friendly solutions:

Despite recent bad press of a select few dairy farmers’ poor environmental practices, New Zealand farmers are showing an increasing interest in finding environmentally friendly farming solutions, according to Frizzell Agricultural Electronics General Manager Alastair Frizzell.

Frizzell have supplied farmers with solar powered water pump systems for the past five years and have noticed a steady increase in demand as farmers search for more sustainable ways to farm.

“We’re getting more and more calls from farmers who genuinely care about implementing sustainable farming practices,” Alastair said. . . 

How a huge dairy is solving a major pollution problem – Beth Kowitt:

Hint: The secret ingredient comes from cows.

Though city dwellers may not realize it, agriculture is a big source of carbon emissions. That’s because of livestock’s production of methane, how manure is handled, and soil management (something as simple as tilling the soil releases greenhouse gases). Dairy geniuses Mike and Sue McCloskey, partners in one of the country’s biggest dairy operations, have come up with an elegant approach to tackling several of these problems at once in the hopes of creating a zero-carbon footprint dairy farm. At the heart of the operation: a process that turns their dairies’ tons of cow manure into natural-gas fuel. Here’s how it works. . . 

 

 


Rural round-up

November 27, 2015

Rural NZ areas sit on ‘powder keg’ as temperatures rise – Mike Watson:

Rural fire authorities are warning farmers and contractors to check for potential ‘hot spots’ inside machinery and farm equipment as temperatures rise in Marlborough.

Marlborough Kaikoura Rural Fire Authority chief fire officer Richard McNamara said the rural region was on a “powder keg’ as temperatures rise and hot northwest winds continued to dry vegetation causing significant risk of fire outbreaks.

“It is a real issue, and anyone working with farm machinery and equipment, such as welding or grinding, needs to be aware of the risk of sparks igniting any vegetation nearby,” he said. . . 

Many positives but RMA reforms don’t go far enough:

Federated Farmers cautiously welcomes the Resource Legislation Amendment Bill introduced at Parliament today, but is concerned that proposed reforms do not go far enough.

“What we have is a Bill that looks to make the RMA less costly and cumbersome, and these are positive changes,” says Federated Farmers’ Environment and RMA spokesperson Chris Allen.

“Federated Farmers believes the Bill provides for better plan making and we support the introduction of a collaborative planning approach as long as the right checks and balances are in place, so that this is a robust and productive process.” . . .

Alliance launches new products for Chinese market:

Meat cooperative Alliance Group is launching a new range of market-ready lamb, beef and venison products for the food retail market in China.

Alliance Group has reached an agreement with its in-market partner Grand Farm – China’s single largest importer of sheepmeat – to market the co-branded Pure South-Grand Farm products in the country from next year.

Marketing general manager Murray Brown said with meat volumes going into China becoming more difficult, the company was looking to add value to exports. . . .

Competitive future for “unbroken” NZ dairy – visiting global expert:

New Zealand dairy is well placed to compete in the global market as prices begin to recover in the coming 12 months, a visiting global dairy specialist has told localproducers.

Tim Hunt, New York-based global dairy strategist with international agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank, says while current market conditions are “extremely tough” for many local producers, the New Zealand dairy sector is “unbroken” and has the fundamentals in place to enjoy a strong, competitive future in the global dairy trade. . . .

Ongoing disruption and volatility in dairy, with winners and losers – Keith Woodford:

In the last two weeks we have seen increasing signs of further disruption and volatility in dairy. First, there was good news with Fonterra announcing that they had turned the corner In relation to enhanced corporate profitability. But then, only two days later, there was another decline on the (GDT Global Dairy Trade) auction – this time of 7.9 percent overall and 11 percent for whole-milk powder.

In the meantime, The a2 Milk Company announced that they were almost doubling their previous estimate of profitability for the coming year, triggering another increase in the share price. Since the start of November through to 24 November the price rose 60 percent on large volumes. . . 

Ruataniwha promoter seeks mix of equity, debt funding – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Hawke’s Bay Regional Investment Co, the developer and sponsor of the Ruataniwha Water Storage Scheme, says the $275 million project will be funded with a mix of equity and debt, and is likely to result in a secondary market for water contracts.

HBRIC, the investment arm of Hawke’s Bay Regional Council, is in talks with three potential investors and banks about funding. The council is putting up $80 million for an equity stake in a yet-to-be formed irrigation company. The $195 million balance will come from outside investors, bank debt and an expected contribution from the government’s Crown Irrigation Investments, which acts as a bridging investor for regional water infrastructure developments. . . 

Cellphone helps save house from Australian bushfire:

An Australian man who saw his farm “explode in a fireball” on CCTV cameras at the property says his house survived because he used his phone to activate a sprinkler system from the other side of the country.

Charles Darwin University vice chancellor Professor Simon Maddocks said the reason his house at the 45-hectare wheat farm on the outskirts of Hamley Bridge escaped the fire was because of his neighbours – and the fact he activated an irrigation system at the property by remote control from Darwin.

Two people have been confirmed dead and more than a dozen injured in the fires which continue to burn north of Adelaide. . . 

Consultation on freshwater management ideas planned:

A report today published by the Land and Water Forum on the next steps needed to improved management of freshwater will be carefully considered by Government and help contribute to a public discussion paper to be published next year, Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy said today. 

“The Government has an ambitious programme of work on improving New Zealand’s freshwater management.  These ideas on requiring good management practice, of how we can maximise the economic benefit of water within environmental limits, integrated catchment management, stock exclusion and enabling more efficient use of water are a further contribution on how we can achieve that,” Dr Smith says.

“I acknowledge the Forum’s significant efforts in tackling difficult policy challenges and we welcome their recommendations,” says Mr Guy. . . 

Irrigation New Zealand Welcomes 4th LAWF Report:

Irrigation New Zealand welcomes the fourth Land and Water Forum (LAWF) Report.

“The diverse group of forum members have spent a lot of time collaborating to reach the additional recommendations,” said Andrew Curtis, CEO of Irrigation New Zealand. “This has resulted in constructive advice to Ministers for the development of freshwater policy. It’s now time for the government to act.”

“Freshwater is a natural and recurring resource we need to protect, and is a national asset which needs to be properly and carefully managed to bolster our agricultural-led economy. . . .

Barbara Stuart returns to the NZWAC board:

Nelson farmer and outdoor-access supporter Barbara Stuart has been appointed to the Board of the New Zealand Walking Access Commission.

The appointment heralds Mrs Stuart’s second tenure on the board, where she previously served from 2008 to 2011.

New Zealand Walking Access Commission chairman John Forbes said Mrs Stuart had long been a champion of walking access and her return was very welcome. . . .

Farm Environment Trust’s Annual Report Highlights Growth:

The New Zealand Farm Environment (NZFE) Trust and its flagship event, the Ballance Farm Environment Awards, have celebrated another successful year.

Now available on the Trust’s website, the 2015 annual report outlines the organisation’s continued growth through 2015, with another region signing up to the Ballance Farm Environment Awards (BFEA).

“We are delighted to have the Auckland region in the Awards for the 2016 programme,” said NZFE Trust chairman Simon Saunders.

“Having Auckland on board is a huge step towards being able to offer a complete national programme. We are almost there.” . . . 


Rural round-up

November 12, 2015

Fonterra’s silent majority hold key to shareholder vote on number of directors:

Fonterra shareholders who want to send a message to their company have been encouraged to support the proposal to reduce the number of directors on the company’s board.

Colin Armer and Greg Gent, the two former directors behind the proposal, say that shareholders are the only people who own the company’s constitution and the only people who have the right to change it.

Mr Gent said he wanted to encourage those who do not normally vote to do so this time. . . 

Improving resource base key to sustainable growth:

Improving the quality of our natural resources is the key to sustaining economic growth in our primary sectors right across regional New Zealand, says Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

Ministers Joyce and Guy today launched the updated Building Natural Resources chapter of the Business Growth Agenda with an emphasis on lifting primary sector productivity while improving our environmental outcomes at the same time.

“Our natural resources are central to achieving growth and more jobs in New Zealand’s economy, especially our regional economies. We are committed to using new scientific techniques and innovations, alongside infrastructure developments in information technology and water storage, to achieve both productivity gains and environmental gains,” says Mr Joyce. . . 

NZ’s primary sector leaders of tomorrow still bank on brand Kiwi, want deeper debate on GMOs – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s emerging agri-business leaders say affluent consumers in 2035 will pay a premium for products sold with a strong provenance story and that are more tailored to their needs, according to KPMG’s Agribusiness Agenda 2015.

The accounting firm asked a range of primary sector organisations to nominate emerging leaders and more than 50 of them – scientists, company executives, farmers, government officials and marketers – met for a summit in Auckland in September and were asked to share their vision for the sector in 2035. They were also surveyed on their priorities and the results compared to a separate poll of current leaders. . . 

RBNZ asks banks to stress test dairy loans, confident they can weather downturn – Paul McBeth:

(BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s major lenders are able to cope with a protracted downturn in the dairy sector, which the Reserve Bank estimates could cause credit losses of as much as 18 percent over a four-year period.

The central bank has requested the five biggest lenders to the dairy sector – ASB Bank, ANZ Bank New Zealand, Bank of New Zealand, Westpac New Zealand and Rabobank New Zealand – to stress test their portfolios, which the Reserve Bank sees as a growing risk to the health of the nation’s financial stability. The regulator was encouraged by “realistic provisions” set aside for the portfolios, and its modelling suggests a sustained downturn would be manageable for the wider system. . . 

Dairy farming not fanning Indonesian forest fires:

Federated Farmers echoes the concerns of Greenpeace and others regarding the devastation and environmental impact of forest fires that have burned for more than three weeks across Indonesia, but says the use of Palm Kernel Expeller (PKE) as a supplementary feed source for dairy cows is not to blame.

“It’s important to remember that PKE is not the reason for these fires or tropical deforestation. It is a by-product of the extraction of palm oil and palm kernel oil which would otherwise be treated as waste,’ says Federated Farmers Dairy Industry Chair Andrew Hoggard.

“Dairy farmers are taking this waste product and making use of it as a supplementary food source, used mainly as an alternative to pasture during adverse weather such as droughts, to maintain the welfare of herds and the productivity of New Zealand’s vitally important dairy industry.” . . 

Panning for Pink Gold: Fonterra Expands Capacity in High-Value Lactoferrin:

It takes 10,000 litres of milk and incredibly sophisticated technology to make just one kilogram of lactoferrin – a high-value ingredient that Fonterra has recently doubled its capacity to produce.

The new $11 million upgrade of the lactoferrin plant at the Co-operative’s Hautapu site is now running at full volume, helping to meet growing worldwide demand for the product affectionately known as ‘pink gold’.

Lactoferrin is a naturally occurring iron-binding protein found in milk and is in high demand, particularly in Asia, for a wide range of nutritional applications from infant formula through to health foods and yoghurts. . . 

Enter Dairy Industry Awards and go on holiday:

Those that enter the 2016 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards can win a holiday of their choosing – so long as they enter soon.

Entries in the 2016 New Zealand Share Farmer of the Year, Dairy Manager of the Year and Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions are now being accepted online at www.dairyindustryawards.co.nzand close on November 30.

Those that enter by midnight on November 20* will go into the Early Bird Entry Prize Draw and be in with a chance to win a share of $12,000 in travel vouchers and spending money. . . 


Rural round-up

November 3, 2015

Advertising executive’s shock speech tackles farmer depression – Rachel Thomas:

The final speech of the day was supposed to be a light-hearted talk about city boys working in the country.

Instead, advertising executive Matt Shirtcliffe stood up in front of a conference of roughly 120 farming and business folk and told them his wife was dead. 

“Depression took her life.” . . 

The presentation is here.

Kathryn Ryan interviewed Matt Shirtcliffe here.

India farmers’ ‘seeds of suicide’: 200-year old story behind a modern tragedy – Aneela Mirchandani :

In 1998, a farmer in Warangal, India killed himself after a failed crop by drinking pesticide. His body was found hours later lying amidst his one-acre crop, which was overrun by worms. This suicide was one of many that were reported on at the time; the incidence was particularly high among cotton farmers. It set off much hand-wringing in the press: how was India failing its farmers?

The stated cause of this farmer’s suicide was debt, and many anti-GMO activists have linked a spate of similar tragedies to the introduction of GMO cotton — although the genetically engineered crop was not introduced into India until 2002. But if one looks deeper, one can see the real cause: modern crops and a modern economy abutted against a rural population that had changed little since the nineteenth century. . . 

“We farm!”  Wait…  What?  (Our cows explained) – Uptown Girl:

“What do you do?”  Sometimes I identify myself with a lengthy description of my career in Ag finance, but often I just leave it at, “We farm!”
 
I also find myself using “We farm” as an explanation as to why I am alone so often at gatherings.  But the more people I talk to, the more I realize that not everyone knows what I mean when I say, “We farm”.  So I am going to explain exactly what “farming” means to my family.
 
Our farm consists of our cows, our sheep, and our row crops.  I will cover each of these over the next few posts, but will start with our cows.
 
One of my favorite parts of our farm is our cattle herd.  We have what is commonly called a “Cow/Calf operation” – meaning we maintain a group of cows who will raise a baby calf each year, and then sell the baby at weaning time.  . . 

New regulations to protect oceans:

New Government regulations to manage the waste and pollution within New Zealand’s vast Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) come into effect today, Environment Minister Dr Nick Smith says. 

“These new regulations cover discharges of pollutants and waste from offshore installations like oil rigs and ships in the six million square kilometres of ocean in New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone and Continental Shelf. They provide clear rules that protect the ocean environment and are the final stage of implementing the Government’s new environmental law covering the ocean,” Dr Smith says.  . . 

Glerups extends wool contract with NZ Merino through 2017 – Tina Morrison:

(BusinessDesk) – Glerups, the Danish woollen slipper maker, has extended its contract with New Zealand woolgrowers to meet increased demand for its product.

The company inked a 2017 contract through the New Zealand Merino Company for 120 tonnes of wool for about $1.5 million, during a visit to New Zealand this week, and expects to return next year to secure a 2018 contract, said Glerups supply chain manager Jesper Glerup Kristensen, the son of the company founder Nanny Glerup. It also extended its 2016 contract by 20 tonnes to 100 tonnes, up from 80 tonnes this year. . . 

Red Meat Sector welcomes decision to negotiate an EU-NZ Free Trade Agreement:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) and the Meat Industry Association (MIA) are delighted that the European Union and New Zealand are set to progress negotiations for a Free Trade Agreement, as announced by Prime Minister John Key in Brussels.

The European Union (EU) is a very significant export market for New Zealand red meat products, worth nearly NZ$1.9 billion for the year ended December 2014. The EU is New Zealand’s largest market by region for sheepmeat exports, and second-largest for chilled beef and wool exports. . . 

Appointment of Independent Director to Fonterra Board:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited announced today the appointment of a new Independent Director Clinton Dines who will take up the Board position made vacant when Sir Ralph Norris steps down at the Annual Meeting on 25 November.

Chairman John Wilson said world-class governance is one of the Board’s top priorities, and the Co-operative needed directors with a broad range of talent and depth of business experience.

“The Board welcomes Mr Dines, an Australian, who has outstanding business and governance credentials. . . .

Fonterra Welcomes Progress towards NZ EU FTA:

Fonterra has welcomed today’s announcement in Brussels that Prime Minister John Key will begin discussions on a Free Trade Agreement with the European Union.

“This is an important first step towards a comprehensive and high-quality free trade agreement with the EU. We have free trade agreements with almost all of our other major trading partners, so this really is the missing piece,” said Miles Hurrell, Group Director of Co-operative Affairs. . . 

Wine Industry welcomes prospect of free trade with the EU:

New Zealand Winegrowers welcomes the announcement of a proposed Free Trade Agreement (FTA) between New Zealand and the EU.

Improved access into the EU would be hugely beneficial to industry growth, commented Philip Gregan, New Zealand Winegrowers CEO. ‘An FTA with the EU would be a great outcome for New Zealand’s wine industry. The EU, as a whole, represents our single largest market, with exports totalling over $460 million and representing in excess of 30% of total wine exports. . . 

 


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