Quote of the day

April 21, 2015

He would cough a lot and turn dusky and a bit blue, and cough and vomit and started losing weight,” says Ms Jackson. “It was all a pretty grim situation really.” . . .

“They had to do CPR for a lot of the night and I had to sit there and watch him,” Ms Jackson says. “It was awful to sit on that bed, and watch that tiny little body and be completely helpless.” . . . TV3

Chosen because it is World Immunisation Week

World Immunization Week 2015 poster


Are you getting enough?

April 13, 2015

It’s Iron Awareness week and too many people aren’t getting enough:

Iron deficiency remains an ongoing issue for many New Zealanders, with many unaware they have deficient levels.

According to the last national nutrition surveys, low iron levels were evident in one in 14 adult women over 15 years old with over a third of teenage girls aged 15-18 years not achieving their daily iron requirements.

Furthemore, 8 out of 10 toddlers are not meeting the recommended daily intake of dietary iron and 14% of children under 2 are deficient.

In recognition of these concerning statistics, Beef + Lamb New Zealand is pleased to facilitate an Iron Awareness Week commencing Monday 13th April, with an aim to raise awareness on the importance of dietary iron, recognising the signs of low iron and what you can do about it. . .

 That includes 10 tips to improve your iron intake:

Fatigue, lethargy, frequent infections and reduced resistance to cold. It may surprise you that these commonplace symptoms are often caused by iron deficiency and can be easily avoided by increasing your iron intake.

Follow these ten simple steps to make sure your daily intake is adequate:

Eat Lean Meat Regularly for Top Iron Intake

There are two types of iron in food: haem iron (found in meat and fish) and non-haem iron (found mainly in plants). Meat also contains some non-haem iron. The body absorbs the haem iron in meat much more efficiently than the non-haem iron in plant foods. For example 1/4 cup of cooked silverbeet contains 0.5mg of iron, but the body can only use about 5% of this. In comparison, 120g of cooked lean beef contains an average of 3.1mg of iron and the body absorbs around 25% of it. You would need to eat a massive 1kg of cooked silverbeet to get the same amount of iron provided by a serve of 120g of lean meat. This equates to a moderate serving of spaghetti bolognaise or a couple small lamb leg steaks.

See Red

Red meats are richer in haem iron than white meat, poultry and fish, so enjoy lean beef and lamb 3-4 times per week for a top iron intake. 

Get Plenty of Vitamin C

Vitamin C helps the body to use non-haem iron – the iron in plant foods. Include plenty of fruit and vegetables rich in vitamin C with your meals.

Eat Red Meat and Vegetables Together

Eat a combination of red meat and plant foods (vegetables, pasta, rice, legumes, fruits). Eating meat with plant foods will also help the body use more of the non-haem iron by up to four times. Examples of iron-rich meals include meat and vegetable stir-fry, a meat sauce with pasta and vegetables, or a lean beef salad sandwich.

Keep Your Meals Tannin Free

It is better to drink tea and coffee between meals, rather than with your meals. The tannin in tea, and to lesser extent coffee, reduces the amount of iron we can use from food.

Beware of Dieting

Studies show girls and women on low calorie diets do not get their daily iron requirements. Remember, lean beef and lamb are relatively low in calories yet high in iron and can be included in any weight reducing diet.

Extra Iron for Exercise

You need extra iron if you exercise strenuously and often. Have your iron levels checked regularly and ensure your diet is balanced and varied, including lots of foods high in haem iron. Iron-rich foods include beef, lamb, kidneys and liver.

Don’t Rely on Supplements

The iron in pills or supplements and fortified foods such as breakfast cereal is poorly absorbed. Don’t rely on these for your total daily iron needs, and only use supplements if advised by your doctor.

Choose from the Four Main Food Groups

A sure way to improve your iron intake is to eat a balanced and healthy diet. Each day you should eat a variety of foods from the main foods groups: breads and cereals, fruits and vegetables, dairy products and red meat, fish, chicken or a protein alternative (eg beans, lentils, eggs or tofu).

Be Extra Iron Smart if You’re at Risk

Infants, girls and women who have periods, teenagers, pregnant and nursing mothers, sports people, vegetarians and the elderly are most at risk of being iron deficient. Learn how to cook appealing, iron-rich dishes to suit you and your family. Look for ideas on quick and easy beef and lamb dishes. You’ll find recipe cards in supermarkets and butchers’ shops, or visit our website: http://www.recipes.co.nz


The case for vaccination

April 7, 2015


Poodle Science

February 25, 2015

Does one size fit all for health?

The Association for Size Diversity and Health (ASDAH) is excited to announce the launch of “Poodle Science“, a 3-minute explainer video designed to help the public understand the limitations of the current research on weight and health.

“Weight bias so saturates our culture; we take it as “common sense” that being at a higher weight must cause the health problems that are more likely to occur at higher weights”, says Deb Burgard, PhD, Fellow of the Academy of Eating Disorders and a psychologist in private practice in Los Altos, California, who drafted the script and provided creative input in the making of the video.

Some clinicians and activists in the 1980s began talking about a curious truth, that the diets being prescribed did not lead to sustained weight loss. More research began to show that almost all attempts to lose weight ended either in weight cycling, disordered eating, or frank eating disorders. The discussions led to the proposal of the Health at Every Size® model for addressing overall well-being, as opposed to relying on arbitrary numbers to categorize health.

The HAES® model builds on the research showing social issues such as racism, violence, sexism, poverty, weight stigma, and so on, are the most important causes of health disparities. Yet status, equality, equity and social support are rarely addressed within medicine or the clinician-patient relationship. The lack of attention to these issues and the obsessive focus on arbitrary numerical cutoffs to define health and disease, allow market concerns like selling drugs, surgeries, diets, and procedures to trump scientific inquiries about how to optimize human well-being.

“Poodle Science” is now available as a video on ASDAH’s YouTube channel (here is a link to the video). It is the first in a series of videos that will focus on increasing public awareness and research literacy regarding the link between weight and well-being.


Rural round-up

February 9, 2015

Rural sports take centre stage – Paul Taylor:

Shearer David Fagan cemented his status as a true great of the sport with a thrilling victory yesterday.

Fagan (53) beat the 10 best shearers in the country to take the inaugural NZ Speed Shear Championship title, at the Hilux New Zealand Rural Games in Queenstown.

The 16 time NZ Golden Shears and five time world champion faced rival Dion King (40) in the final.

Fagan sheared two sheep in 42.26sec, ahead of King’s 44.48sec. . .

Safer farms launched today:

A six year safety programme aimed at reducing the number of deaths and serious injuries on farms is being launched today.

The programme, Safer Farms, is being launched by Work Safe New Zealand at Lincoln University today. . .

Best young farmer in the South – Paul Taylor:

Winton sharemilker Steve Henderson is the best young farmer in Otago and Southland.

Mr Henderson (28) won the regional final of the ANZ Young Farmer Contest after an exhausting day competing in the Queenstown sunshine on Saturday.

He will now represent the region at the nationals in Taupo on July 6.

”She was a pretty big day against good competition, so it feels good to go through,” Mr Henderson said. . .

Ewes wouldn’t say ‘running’ – Guy Williams:

It was billed as the Running of the Wools, but ”running” doesn’t quite sum up this sheep yarn.

Slideshow here

It had less of the stampeding and goring of Pamplona’s Running of the Bulls, and more of the barking, eye-balling and milling around of television’s A Dog’s Show. . .

The problem of food: Scientist puts spotlight on crisis:

“Food safety and security is one of the most significant challenges humanity has ever faced. We are entering a global crisis, and the complexity of the problem demands urgent measures.”

That’s according to Lincoln University Senior Lecturer in Food Microbiology, Dr Malik Hussain, whose comments come as part of an editorial in a special edition of the journal Advances in Food Technology and Nutritional Sciences.

At the heart of the challenge lie the pressing issues of a large, rapidly growing population, deteriorating agricultural soils, falling water tables, and the need to rapidly modify production methods based on climate change.

According to Dr Hussain, while food safety and security issues are nothing new, it’s the scale and interconnectedness of the problem that makes the situation more serious now. . .

Winton entrant wins top awards – Sally Rae:

Winton deer farmer Dave Lawrence, from the Tikana stud, won the champion of champions title at the Elk and Wapiti Society of New Zealand’s annual velvet and antler competition in Wanaka.

Mr Lawrence, who enjoyed considerable success in the competition, which attracted 63 entries, won the five year section, before claiming the top award. . .

Women’s programme receives support:

A programme to help upskill women on sheep and beef farms has just received significant new backing.

The programme, Understanding Your Farming Business, is run by the Agri-Women’s Development Trust with funding from the Government and industry collaboration, the Red Meat Profit Partnership.

The trust’s executive director Lindy Nelson said it helped women to gain a better understanding of what drives a farming business and how to measure on-farm performance. . .

Charity bike ride for rural mental health issues – Dave Goosselink:

The taboo subjects of depression and suicide in the farming community are behind a South Island charity bike ride.

Twenty-seven riders are cycling from Picton to Bluff to raise awareness of mental health issues, and for Southland farmer John Dowdle, it’s a very personal issue.

As well as getting up early to bring in the cows, Mr Dowdle has been busy training for a charity ride. He’ll spend the next nine days cycling down the West Coast along with 26 other riders, raising awareness for an issue that’s not often discussed. . .

New Zealand wine goes head-to-head with Australia and England to celebrate the Cricket World Cup:

The cricket pitch is not the only place New Zealand will be competing with the two sporting behemoths, Australia and England, during the upcoming Cricket World Cup. New Zealand wine is battling it out with Australian and English wine in a series of cricket-themed blind tastings this month to celebrate the start of the competition.

To kick-off the celebrations, New Zealand sparkling wine will compete with English sparkling wine in the “Battle of the Bubbles” on 19 February in Wellington. 12 wines from each country will be tasted blind by two teams, each headed by one Wine Captain. Jane Skilton MW will captain New Zealand with moral support from cricketing legend Stephen Fleming. Wine super-star Oz Clarke will lead the English team. . .

 


Moderation movement

February 5, 2015

Among all the bad and mad advice on what and how and how much to eat, there is occasionally a voice of sanity:

There is more than one way to achieve wellness.  There is not one 'correct' way of eating or moving in order to be healthy.  Be wary of anyone who claims there is. If there's more than one path to wellness then how do you know which is the best way for YOU?   Here are my tips for finding your own healthy balance... YOUR best path to wellness will: Be sustainable for you Your habits could easily be sustained for the rest of your life.  They are not extreme behaviours that can only be followed for a short period of time.  They are suited to your lifestyle, your working hours, your family commitments and your preferences.   Make you feel great (long term) Your health habits should make you feel physically, mentally and emotionally better.  You should not feel guilty, anxious or obsessive.  (Those feelings are a sure sign you're not on the right wellness path for you).   Be flexible Your food and exercise choices should allow for social events, eating out, and celebrations.  Your ideal path to wellness recognises that these are an important part of your life and you should enjoy them without anxiety or guilt.   Get advice from true experts When you're feeling unwell you book in to see your GP.  When you need assistance with your eating or digestive issues you book to see a dietitian.  When you have an injury you book in to see a physiotherapist.  Your best path to wellness will let the true experts guide you, ignoring health trends and self-proclaimed health gurus. Be focused on how you feel and function (rather than how you look) Achieving wellness is about feeling energised, moving more easily, eliminating or reducing pain, boosting immunity, and reducing your risk of disease.  Feeling strong, fit, well and energised is awesome.  Shaping your body to look a particular way is not improving your wellness and it's worth reminding yourself of the difference regularly. Not follow others blindly Only you know what makes you feel better physically, mentally and emotionally.  Sometimes to sort it all out you'll need expert advice and consultation, but it's still your journey, your choice.  Just because a friend or family member feels fabulous eating one way, or doing particular exercise, doesn't mean you will too.   Be open to discussion and new evidence When you're on your best path to wellness, you don't feel the need to defend it aggressively.  You're open to discussing other's ways of eating and exercising.  You don't judge other's paths because you know they're choosing their own way, like you're choosing your own way.  You don't shame others.  You're willing to read new research or hear from experts and you make your own decisions about it.  You feel confident in your choices because they are YOURS. Have I forgotten anything?  How do you know when you're on the right (or wrong) path to wellness for YOU? - Jodie, Healthy Balance Fitness

 

There is more than one way to achieve wellness. There is not one ‘correct’ way of eating or moving in order to be healthy. Be wary of anyone who claims there is.

If there’s more than one path to wellness then how do you know which is the best way for YOU?

Here are my tips for finding your own healthy balance…

YOUR best path to wellness will:

* Be sustainable for you

Your habits could easily be sustained for the rest of your life. They are not extreme behaviours that can only be followed for a short period of time. They are suited to your lifestyle, your working hours, your family commitments and your preferences.

* Make you feel great (long term)

Your health habits should make you feel physically, mentally and emotionally better. You should not feel guilty, anxious or obsessive. (Those feelings are a sure sign you’re not on the right wellness path for you).

* Be flexible

Your food and exercise choices should allow for social events, eating out, and celebrations. Your ideal path to wellness recognises that these are an important part of your life and you should enjoy them without anxiety or guilt.

* Get advice from true experts

When you’re feeling unwell you book in to see your GP. When you need assistance with your eating or digestive issues you book to see a dietitian. When you have an injury you book in to see a physiotherapist. Your best path to wellness will let the true experts guide you, ignoring health trends and self-proclaimed health gurus.

* Be focused on how you feel and function (rather than how you look)

Achieving wellness is about feeling energised, moving more easily, eliminating or reducing pain, boosting immunity, and reducing your risk of disease. Feeling strong, fit, well and energised is awesome. Shaping your body to look a particular way is not improving your wellness and it’s worth reminding yourself of the difference regularly.

* Not follow others blindly

Only you know what makes you feel better physically, mentally and emotionally. Sometimes to sort it all out you’ll need expert advice and consultation, but it’s still your journey, your choice. Just because a friend or family member feels fabulous eating one way, or doing particular exercise, doesn’t mean you will too.

* Be open to discussion and new evidence

When you’re on your best path to wellness, you don’t feel the need to defend it aggressively. You’re open to discussing other’s ways of eating and exercising. You don’t judge other’s paths because you know they’re choosing their own way, like you’re choosing your own way. You don’t shame others. You’re willing to read new research or hear from experts and you make your own decisions about it. You feel confident in your choices because they are YOURS.

Have I forgotten anything? How do you know when you’re on the right (or wrong) path to wellness for YOU?

This comes from the Moderation Movement.


This Girl Can

January 16, 2015

Love the line I jiggle therefore I am:


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