Quote of the day

September 22, 2015

“More chance of me holidaying on the lunar space station I would’ve thought,” he said at his post-Cabinet news conference today.

“There’s no chance. . . 

“It’d be totally unacceptable to the New Zealand public. Being Prime Minister is not something that is traded away with a bit coalition partner to get them over the line.”

Mr Key wasn’t sure how that would even work.

“He could take the weekends? Give me the time off, it’d be quite nice. Outside of that, I don’t see it working. It’s a joke.” –  John Key commenting on the suggestion that Winston Peters could be Prime Minister in a National-led government.,

Rural round-up

September 1, 2015

‘Water is the next gold’ where expectations and dreams become reality – Kate Taylor:

After starting his working life in a family motor business, Jerry Greer took up farming with a young family and a determination to make a success of his new vocation.

“I had always had a yearning for the land, loved working with animals and loved being outside,” he says.

Jerry and wife Diana love the life they have created in the Argyll East farming district, between Tikokino and Waipawa, and being close to their four children and four grandchildren.

All have an interest in farming, Diana says. . . 

Working on cost of irrigation scheme – Lynda van Kempen

Good things take time, say the promoters of the Manuherikia irrigation scheme.

Feedback will be sought from landowners on revised figures by Christmas, after the estimated costs of the scheme upgrade almost trebled from initial estimates, forcing a rethink of the design and costs.

”It’s taking a bit longer than we’d have liked, but we’ll keep working at it until we’ve got a scheme that’s economic,” Manuherikia Catchment Water Strategy Group chairman Allan Kane said yesterday. . . 

Former Southland District mayor Frana Cardno’s final gift – Blake Foden:

Frana Cardno’s life was all about giving, and the former Southland District mayor has left her beloved province one final gift.

Three generations of Cardno’s family joined her close friends, members of the community and complete strangers to plant 329 trees on the shores of Lake Te Anau on Saturday afternoon.

A former kindergarten teacher who led the region for more than 20 years, Cardno organised her funeral during her battle with cancer. She asked that mourners dressed in colourful clothing and brought a donation of native trees and shrubs. . . 

Silver Fern Farms won’t rule out foreign investment:

The country’s largest meat co-operative, Silver Fern Farms, is not ruling out foreign investment as part of its capital raising process.

Silver Fern Farms is seeking about $100 million in new funding to help reduce debt and has appointed the stockbroking firm Goldman Sachs to help with that process.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters said he had been made aware Chinese investors want at least a $100 million stake in the company. . .

DairyNZ board candidates put forward

Ten candidates have put their names forward for the three positions up for grabs on the DairyNZ board.

Four farmer candidates have also put their name forward for the three seats on DairyNZ’s directors’ remuneration committee.

Results from the double election would be announced at the DairyNZ Annual General Meeting in Morrinsville on October 13. . .


Log in left eyes

August 19, 2015

Winston Peters started the criticism of Mike Hosking as a National Party stooge.

Labour leader Andrew Little and Green co-leader James Shaw joined in, followed by several left wing bloggers lamenting bias in the media, especially on state-owned TVNZ.

Hosking has an unlikely defender in Brian Edwards who says rather than being right-wing he’s a social conservative.

. . . While I’d be surprised to discover that Hosking is a closet member of the Parnell, Remuera or Epsom branches of the Labour Party  – total membership five! – I’d also risk my bottom dollar that he isn’t a member of any political party. This is, or should be the default position for any broadcaster working in the field of news or current affairs.

What Hosking betrays on Seven Sharp, on commercial radio and in his writing is not political bias but social conservatism. The two may overlap from time to time, but are inherently different. It’s entirely possible and even commonplace to be left wing and socially conservative. . . 

Whatever his views, isn’t it strange that many of the people who are so upset by Hosking thought it was absolutely marvelous that John Campbell who wears his left wing heart on his sleeve was appointed to state-owned RadioNZ  National.

Perhaps the log in their own eyes blinds them to their hypocrisy and to Hosking’s professionalism.

Both he and Campbell are very good interviewers who are more than capable of putting their own views aside to ask tough questions of people across the political spectrum.



Cool heads

August 10, 2015

Wise words from Federated Farmers president Dr William Rolleston (6:10) (transcript here):

. . . “I think the most important thing is to have cool heads at this time. . .

“I don’t see it at this point as a crisis. It’ll be a crisis if people start panicking and I don’t see that happening. I see the banks actually working very well with farmers. . . “

The Chicken Littles are saying it’s a crisis.

It’s not.

The low payout will mean most, if not all, dairy farms make a loss this season but banks will work with their clients to get them through the low payout providing their clients work with them.

People will leave the industry. Rolleston rightly said that happens in good times and bad.

But banks understand the cyclical nature of farming and will do everything they can to avoid forcing people out.

They know that’s not good for banks or the troubled clients and would also be bad for untroubled ones by depressing land values and therefore equity for everyone else in the industry.

The Chicken-Littleing by people like Winston Peters who was also interviewed is politics at its worst and Rolleston gets full marks for his response to the question of whether Peters gets any cut through with Feds (7:49):

“I would say we listen politely.”

That’s more than Peters and the others who are trying to engineer a crisis for political reasons deserve.

Labour leader Andrew Little is no better declaring a crisis and the bogey-man of a stepp increase in foreign ownership.

But as Adolf at No Minister points out that Labour’s declaration of a crisis is a good thing:

. . . This is the best news cow cockies have had for some time.  Now that Labour has delivered its midas touch, you can bet on milksold prices improving within six months.

Someone needs to sit down with Little and quietly explain that an outbreak of foot and mouth disease is a crisis for the industry while aa period of low prices is normal in a commodity market. 

Meanwhile, on the farm where the people who really know what’s going on are hard at work, sharemilkers told me this will be a tough season but sooner or later there will be better ones.

Like Rolleston, they’re keeping cool heads.

They’re also accepting that global prices are something they can’t control, concentrating on things they can control and are seriously unimpressed by those trying to precipitate a crisis through political posturing.

Why bother with voters?

August 2, 2015

This headline should cause disquiet in anyone who cares for democracy: Peters: NZ First will decide 2017 election.

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters says he will be more powerful than ever by the next election and will decide the next government. . . .

Why bother with voters?

If he won’t give us the courtesy of explaining his intentions before the election and does what he’s done in the past, leaving us voting blind, why bother with an election?

He wants to be king maker but he’ still not willing or able to give a straight answer to a straight question.

. . .  You said you’d resign if you don’t get tens of thousands of new members? “Yeah, precisely. There’d be no sense going on.” That’s a commitment from you. Tens of thousands or you’re gone? “Yes”. Could we narrow that down – more than 10,000 or you’ll resign? “No, I said if we don’t increase our membership… Why don’t you ask a straight question?” But we did… “Well maybe I didn’t hear properly…stop your humbug.”

This old leopard won’t change his spots and he’s dreaming if he thinks he can increase his membership to that extent.

As a member of National, the only party in New Zealand which has tens of thousands of members, I know what it takes to attract and retain members.

If Labour with nation-wide electorate structures and unions helping can’t do it, Peters and his party which never stands in more than a handful of seats won’t have a chance.

So many shades of stupid

July 30, 2015

Andrew Little’s latest desperate ploy for publicity merely demonstrates so many shades of stupid.

. . . Labour leader Andrew Little has described God Defend New Zealand as “a dirge” and claims many Kiwis prefer to sing along to the Australian anthem. A dirge can mean a mournful song or a lament for the dead. . .

I will concede that the anthem is sometimes dirge-like and have blogged on that.

But that is only when it’s played that way.

If played at a decent tempo it is rousing as an anthem should be.

But to claim that many of us prefer to sing Advance Australia Fair?

As anthems go, it’s a good one but if many of the Kiwis he mixes with prefer to sing along to the Aussie anthem than our own it suggests he’s in touch with a sad subset of people and out of touch with the majority.

The stupidest thing about this outburst, though is the timing when he’s doing the best to sabotage the flag-change process in spite of being on record saying he not only favours a change he supports the referendum process for it.

Here’s Labour’s official policy from 2014:

Labour will: review the design of the New Zealand flag involving flag design experts and with full public consultation and involvement.

We believe that the time has come for a change and it is right for the issue to be put to the public.

And in case that isn’t clear enough, here’s his personal views from last October:

Q: Should NZ change its flag: What’s your personal opinion? Should there be a referendum? If you want the flag changed, what’s your favourite design?

A: Yes, my personal opinion is we should have something more relevant to an independent, small Asia/Pacific nation. I think a referendum is a suitable way to deal with an issue that can be very polarising. . .

Had Labour, perish the thought, got into government then not gone ahead with the consultation and referendum it would stand accused of breaking an election promise.

Going back on the commitment to change for petty political purposes and thereby politicising the process when the government has done all it can to involve other parties is at least as bad.

Given Little’s precarious position, when he’s failed to gain traction for himself and his party and he’s now even less popular than Winston Peters, he should be very careful about making funereal references.

Ask not for whom the dirge plays, it could be playing for his political ambition.

And to those who say the flag issue is merely bread and circuses to distract the masses, you have a very low opinion of the ability most of us to care and do something about more than one thing at a time.


Quote of the day

April 20, 2015

. . . Tonight’s poll basically has no change in the party vote from February. The one area where there was significant change was Preferred PM. Andrew Little went down 1% to 11% and Winston went up 3% to 10%. So the main impact of the by-election has been Andrew Little coming close to ceding the title of opposition leader to Winston Peters.  Labour may want to reflect on the difference between a strategic decision and a tactical one.David Farrar


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