Rural round-up

September 21, 2019

New water policies will hobble farmers – Simon Davies:

Farmers are being hamstrung by well-meaning but poorly targeted regulation, writes Simon Davies of Otago Federated Farmers.

Today, while crutching my breeding rams, I was considering the latest policy package from central government.

To be fair there was not a lot of constructive thought undertaken, as this task is a fairly intense activity as those of you who have done it know. For those of you who have not, crutching rams (removing the wool around the tail and between the legs for hygiene purposes) is a bit like wrestling 80 to 100kg sacks of potatoes that fight back.

As I was struggling with a sore back, the term hamstrung came to mind. . .

How did farmers become public enemy number one? – Rachael Kelly:

Last November, Southland dairy farmer Jason Herrick contemplated taking his own life.

A wet spring had turned his farm to mud, his family was “going through some stuff” and anti-farming messages on social media all affected his self-worth.

They’re our number one export producers, an industry that was once seen as the proud back-bone of the nation.

But farmers are almost becoming ashamed of what they do because they’re being attacked from all fronts, Herrick says. . . .

No quick change to farm systems – Pam Tipa::

People don’t appreciate how difficult it is to change farm systems quickly, says Pāmu chief executive Steven Carden.

“They are difficult biological systems and people who are not in farming expect you to be able to switch on the new system overnight,” he told Dairy News.

“It takes a long time to get those changes right, to embed the new technologies in farm systems to make them work effectively. Farmers fundamentally are small business people who can’t risk their entire business with a big shift in how they operate one year to the next. . .

They like you – Luke Chivers:

Public perceptions of farming are more positive than farmers think, a survey shows.

“The strong theme we have heard from farmers in the past is that they do not feel well-liked by their urban counterparts. However, when you poll the general population, this is simply not true,” UMR research executive director Marc Elliot says.

UMR surveyed more than 1000 people last month and found the response at odds with the view held by many in primary industries. 

New Zealanders are almost five times as likely to hold a positive view of sheep and beef farming than a negative one, the research showed. . .

Tractor protest on Saturday – Hugh Stringleman:

Northland farmers have been asked to join a tractor protest over the costs and effects of Government regulations.

Protest organiser and dairy farmer Mark Dawson said the event will be on the southern side of Ruawai township in the Kaipara District between 11am and 1pm on Saturday.

It will be a symbolic protest aimed at what he believes will be the horrendous effects on farming of the proposed freshwater legislation.

Northland MP Matt King, National, has promised support along with Kaipara mayor and beef farmer Jason Smith. . .

ORC candidates quizzed on future of farming :

How do candidates standing for the Otago Regional Council see the future of farming in Otago? That question and others has been posed to all candidates by Southern Rural Life ahead of next month’s local body election. It is shaping up to be an interesting election, with 28 people vying for 12 positions.

All candidates were asked by Southern Rural Life to respond to the following questions and their responses are below (responses were not received from Matt Kraemer, Andrew Noone, Gail May-Sherman and Gordon Dickson)

Question 1
Why are you standing for council?

Question 2
How do you see the future of farming in Otago?

Question 3
Good management practice and improvements to some farming activities will be needed if Otago’s water aspirations are to be achieved. What approach to regulation and rules do you support and where do you think partnerships,  incentives and industry support might fit in (if at all)?

Question 4
Do you think there should be discretion for regional councils to determine local solutions for local issues or should a centralized response always apply instead? . . .

c


Rural round-up

February 27, 2019

South Canterbury’s Opuha Dam an example for the country – Joanne Holden:

Opuha Dam is a water storage “success story” National MPs would like to see adopted around the country.

The 20-year-old dam was the first stop on Friday for National’s Primary Industries Caucus Committee – hosted by Rangitata MP Andrew Falloon – as they toured Mid and South Canterbury’s primary industry spots.

On the trip were MPs Nathan Guy, Jacqui Dean, Matt King, Hamish Walker, and List MP Maureen Pugh, who also visited Heartland Potato Chips in Washdyke, the Managed Aquifer Recharge in Hinds, and spoke to South Canterbury community members about the future of primary industries. . .

 

Farm conflicts in tourist hotspot – Neal Wallace:

A billionaire lives on a lifestyle property on one side of Chris and Emma Dagg’s Queenstown farm. On the other is a multi-millionaire.

Land Squeeze Dinkus 1The exclusive Millbrook Resort is nearby and actor Tom Cruise was a neighbour while filming in New Zealand.

The Daggs’ 424ha farm in the Wakatipu Basin between Queenstown and Arrowtown includes some of NZ’s most sort after land for residential development.

A short drive from Queenstown, the rural setting provides a desirable place for the rich and famous to live, putting pressure on landowners in a region short of land, houses and sections. . . 

Rain in Waikato a good start – more please, farmers say:

Rain in Waikato was good news for farmers but more is needed to keep the threat of drought at bay. 

Until the weekend, the region had only received 0.4 millimetres of rain leaving soil moisture levels dangerously low. 

Federated Farmers Waikato president Andrew McGiven said the 10 millimetres of rain received over the weekend “was a good start”.  . . 

Lanercost open to all farmers – Tim Fulton:

The first Future Farm is contributing to the rehabilitation of a bruised Canterbury farm and community. Tim Fulton reports.

Visitors to Lanercost can see its potential as a sheep and beef demonstration farm, the lessees say.

The North Canterbury hill country property near Cheviot is 1310ha modelled on a farm at Lincoln that has allowed the dairy industry to assess innovation.

Farmer Carl Forrester and Mendip Hills manager Simon Lee have a lease to run the 1310ha Lanercost in partnership with Beef + Lamb New Zealand and Lanercost’s owner, the T D Whelan Trust. . .

Loneliness in farming community is ‘heart-breaking’, police officers say

Police officers have highlighted how ‘heart-breaking’ it is to see some farmers suffer from extreme loneliness and isolation. The issue of loneliness in the farming community has been highlighted by Dyfed-Powys Police, who have a small team of specialist rural officers. PC Gerwyn Davies and PCSO Jude Parr are working closely with mental healthy charity the DPJ Foundation. They have referred several farmers to the charity for counselling and mental health support. . . 

Soil ecologist challenges mainstream thinking on climate change – Candace Krebs:

How cropland and pastures are managed is the most effective way to remedy climate change, an approach that isn’t getting the attention it deserves, according to a leading soil ecologist from Australia who speaks around the world on soil health.

“Water that sits on top of the ground will evaporate. Water vapor, caused by water that evaporates because it hasn’t infiltrated, is the greenhouse gas that has increased to the greatest extent since the Industrial Revolution,” said Christine Jones, while speaking at the No Till on the Plains Conference in Wichita in late January. . . 


Rural round-up

April 12, 2018

Van Leeuwen owner awaits M.bovis compo, says MPI like a ‘slow machine’ –  Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Aad Van Leeuwen is still waiting for compensation from the Ministry for Primary Industries more than nine months after he reported the outbreak of Mycoplasma bovis in his South Canterbury herds.

“There was an advance made a couple of months ago covering barely 20 percent of all the stock but the remaining more than 80 percent has not arrived yet and there are continuous questions coming (from MPI) that have all been answered,” the owner of Van Leeuwen Dairy Group told BusinessDesk. Compensation for the stock alone is around $3 million and doesn’t include anything else such as milk loss, he said. . . 

Farmer research highlights hill country risks and opportunities :

Farmers from Canterbury and Manawatu have shared their stories on their hill country development experiences with research company UMR through an anonymous survey, as part of a research project commissioned by Environment Canterbury, and supported by Beef & Lamb New Zealand and Federated Farmers (South Canterbury).

The in-depth interviews were undertaken to understand current hill country development practices, as Environment Canterbury considers approaches to help farmers determine whether and how to develop their hill country pastures.

Some sheep and beef farmers are improving hill country productivity by planting older hill country pastures with higher producing pasture species. This commonly involves one or more years in winter feed, and creates an increased risk of sediment losses during this period. . .

Gibbs family meet environmental challenges of coastal property – Esther Taunton:

Farming on the South Taranaki coast has its environmental challenges but the Gibbs family tackle them head on.

The regional winners of the 2018 Ballance Farm Environment Awards, Grant, Dinny and Leedom Gibbs of the Gibbs G Trust milk 435 cows on a 122-hectare farm five kilometres south of Manaia.

Steep cliffs form the southern boundary of the property, which is exposed to wind and “devastating” salt spray. . .

Government should commit to rural communities:

National is urging the Government to support the Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) with ongoing funding, National Party associate spokesperson for Health Dr Shane Reti and National Party spokesperson for Rural Communities Matt King say.

“National recognises that rural communities in New Zealand have different needs and face special challenges, especially when it comes to accessing health services,” Dr Reti says.

“We support the RHAANZ’s request for ongoing operating funding outside their existing contracts to ensure that rural communities have access to the services that they need. . . 

NZ ahead of UK sheep genetics – Colin Ley:

New Zealand’s sheep genetics are way ahead of those in Britain, Scotland-based NZ agribusiness consultant Tim Byrne says.

As a senior consultant with Dunedin’s AbacusBio Byrne opened the company’s first European office in June last year to more effectively service British and European Union clients while also seeking to access new areas of agri-tech development in Europe.

While fully convinced that NZ sheep farmers hold a clear genetics advantage over their British counterparts he’s not so sure Kiwi producers are striking a sufficiently strong profile on environmental management issues. . . 

What does added value mean?:

Outsiders commentating on the New Zealand meat industry often confidently pronounce the sector needs to ‘add value’ to the products, but what exactly is added-value, who are you adding value for and who is getting the value? It depends who you talk to.

Meat is a nutritious, and most would say essential, base ingredient in a modern healthy diet – to be eaten in moderation – for end-users around the world.

To get maximum prices, the base material – the meat – needs to be consistently tender, juicy, sized and available all year round. Meeting those demands – producing healthy animals on pasture to precise specification – adds value for a red meat farmer, who earns more money for a premium product.

The consumer might say added-value is something that helps daily life, so increasing the speed of preparation, recipe choice, and portion control might all feature in the added-value mix they will pay more for. . . 


Matt King’s maiden speech

November 21, 2017

Northland MP Matt King’s maiden speech:

Ko Matt King Toku Ingoa

No Te Noota Ahau

No Reira 

Tēnā Koutou, Tēnā Koutou, Tēnā Tatou Katoa

Mr Speaker can I start by congratulating you on your election to the prestigious role of speaker.

I look forward to your many positive rulings over the next 3 years … in our favour.

Members of Parliament, ladies and gentlemen, friends and family, I stand before you filled with pride as the representative of the people of Northland.

I’m proud to be a National Party MP in the most powerful and united opposition this Parliament has ever seen.

Today is my opportunity to introduce myself, share my journey and what I hope to achieve while I’m there.

I come from the mighty Northland a truly beautiful place steeped in history.

I live a short distance from the harbour where Kupe first landed on our shores. 

A short distance from the site of our first Maori settlement and the region with the largest Iwi Ngapuhi.

Our electorates largest town is Kerikeri and it’s also the site of our first permanent European settlement and NZ’s oldest surviving building The Stone Store.

In the beautiful coastal town of Russell we have NZ’ first capital and across the water at Waitangi the grounds where the Treaty was signed.

These factors taken together make us the birthplace of our nation. 

The vast Northland electorate stretches from Cape Reinga and 90 mile beach in the North across to the beautiful Whangaroa and BOI harbours in the east to Dargaville and the mighty Tane Mahuta Kauri in the west then wrapping around Whangarei and extending past Wellsford and Mangawhai to the south.

We have 1700kms of coastline and the best scenery in the country despite what my colleague Tamati Coffey might try and tell you.

We enjoy the country’s highest average temperature, we have 3.6 per cent of the population and just over 5% of the land area.

We are a region with many challenges but I am incredibly positive and optimistic about our future.

It’s a true honour to be voted in by the people of Northland to represent them and it’s a real privilege to be one of 120 people tasked with the responsibility of ensuring this country is governed well.

I want to acknowledge our leader Bill English and our senior management team both past and present for their leadership and guidance of our country over the past 9 years through the GFC, the Christchurch earthquakes and several other major challenges we have faced as a Nation.

Mr Speaker, can I also acknowledge our Party President, Peter Goodfellow and the National Party board he leads.

I want to acknowledge Northern Region Chair Andrew Hunt and his executive and finally our general manager Greg Hamilton and the crew from the service centre whom I am told are possibly the best team we have ever had.

I would also like to acknowledge my predecessors and the work they have put into the Northland electorate.

I would like to acknowledge my National Party colleagues especially from the 2017 intake and my colleagues from across the house for their success in getting here.

We enjoyed some time together during the induction period before the games began and I look forward to working with all of you on the various select committees and other duties.

I would like to mention and acknowledge my two main opponents in Northland Labour’s Willow Jean Prime for showing the same determination and perseverance as I have to make it here.

And NZ First Winston Peters for being unrivalled in his longevity as New Zealand’s longest serving and possibly best known Politician.

It’s important to me that as one of the front men we never forget the team behind us working away to ensure our success.

To my superb Northland electorate team a huge thank you to you all.

I am nothing without you, I appreciate every bit of time, every effort and every bit of encouragement that you have all put in. I want you to enjoy our success because it is OUR success.

Mr Speaker I want to make special mention of our Electorate Chair Rose Ellis. Rose is a massive asset to Northland.

In the 2015 by-election she drove over 10,000kms in one month and put in countless hours of work all at her own cost to support the National campaign in Northland.

In our 2017 campaign Rose didn’t let up she led from the front and really did make a huge difference and I will never forget that.

Mr Speaker I would also like to single out for special mention my campaign chair Grant McCallum.

Grant is a former National Party board member and a man with a mountain of knowledge who was and is a huge help to me.

Grant’s guidance and advice were critical to our success.

Mr Speaker I want to offer my thanks to all Northlanders who supported me through the campaign and put their faith in me to be their representative.

My political career began in 2010 when I entered the rather prolonged race to be the Northland candidate for the 2011 election.

I made the short list on that occasion but didn’t make the podium.

Having no desire to be an MP anywhere but Northland I essentially shelved my political dreams and got on with what was a pretty good life.

Then rather unexpectedly along came round two in 2015. This was a mad dash to the finish in a greatly shortened selection process and this time I made the podium but didn’t get the gold.

Finally in late 2016 in round 3  I made it across the line and was selected as the National Party candidate for Northland.

On that day my campaign began and did not stop until late on 22 September with my electorate chair Rose Ellis balancing on my shoulders pulling out the last nail of our last hoarding.

I credit this long and onerous campaign and my team for our ultimate success in winning back Northland.

Mr Speaker a bit about my early history and my journey here.

I want to thank my family, starting with my wonderful parents who gave me the best start in life anyone could wish for.

If everyone experienced the upbringing I had there would be no need for Policeman or Judges, lawyers or prisons, you wouldn’t even need locks on your doors.

I am the eldest son of Joe and Jenny King who this year celebrated 52 years of marriage.  My father a well-respected Chiropractor and farmer and my mother a school teacher and fantastic provider.

My parents worked really hard for what they have and made many sacrifices to give us the life we enjoyed.

My father’s word is his bond, a handshake seals the deal. He leads by example and set the bar high.

Words cannot describe how proud I am of them.

I was also blessed to briefly know my oldest sister Joanna who was taken from us at a young age. I have one younger sister Tara and one younger brother Patrick whom I admire greatly.  

I’m the proud father of three amazing children, Jake, Robbie and Jasmine and the husband to an incredible woman and mother my wife Sarah.

I was born 50 years ago in Auckland and moved north at aged 9.  We grew up on a picturesque hill country farm in the mid-north which we now own.

We have an amazing life on that farm, swimming in and drinking water from the two rivers that flow through it.

Riding our horses and dirt bikes across the hills, hiking through the bush, eeling in the creeks, scaling the cliffs and climbing deep into the glow worm caves …our farm has it all.

40 years later nothing has changed we can still do that although these days I much prefer to sit on the riverbank and watch my kids do the action stuff.

After leaving schools and scraping together some cash I left on my big OE.

I bought an old American Ford station wagon in San Francisco and for a year it was my home whilst I travelled the length and breadth of North America clocking up over 20,000 miles covering many parts of Mexico, the US and Canada. This was a huge adventure filled with incredible memories and recommend it to all.

On returning to NZ I completed 3 years of study graduating from Auckland University with a Bachelor of Science.

After graduating I followed in my grandfather’s footsteps and joined the Police.

During my 14 year Police career I got to experience the human race in all its glory.  I dealt with the sad the mad and the bad.

I saw and experienced things that cannot be unseen and came out of it at the other end with a heightened level of compassion for people that has never left me.

I learnt many of my most valuable life lessons during this period of my life.

I like to share with you a story about my grandfather also named Joe a policeman for 30 years.

He ended up on the North Shore in Auckland before the harbour bridge was built.

He was the sole policeman from Campbell’s Bay to Waiwera. I recall him telling me many stories from his policing days and these have stuck with me. 

I recall a story where my grandfather received a call to a bad car accident on the Orewa hill north of Auckland.

At that time a new cop had just been stationed in Orewa and my grandfather headed north to assist him.

He learned that a car had rolled that the 3 occupants had been thrown out and that the car had landed on one of them. That the injuries were life threatening head injuries and that it was pretty grim.

My grandfather was told that the injured passenger was his son, my father. On route to the scene my grandfather passed the ambulance going the other way heading to the hospital and knew his son was in it.

He continued on to the scene to help his mate the new cop and did his job because that’s the kind of man he was.

My grandfather has long passed away but if I am half the man he was and my father is then I will be doing alright.

Mr Speaker by far the biggest and proudest achievement of my university days was the discovery of my soul mate and love of my life my wife Sarah.

Sarah has been by my side for the past 27 years and is one out of the box.

I can honestly tell you I would not have made it here without her love and ongoing support.

Never has there been a truer word spoken than beside every successful man their stands a great and equally successful woman.

Mr Speaker I want to close with my dream for Northland.

I want a region where all of our children can grow up get educated, have a career and raise a family in Northland.

I want a region where all of our children are raised in the strong, stable and loving environment that I enjoyed.

That we can stem the flow of our young people out of Northland.

It’s especially personal to me as my son Jake is chasing his dream and training to be an airline pilot in Hamilton.

I would dearly love it if we grew to the stage where he could complete his training in Northland so I could get to enjoy having him around more often.

How do we do grow and prosper well it starts with investing in our infrastructure, our roads, our bridges, our digital and energy network, our schools our hospitals and our people, especially our people.

I want to encourage our many talented people to step up, take leadership roles in our communities, become mentors and lead by example.

I want us to stop talking about the potential that Northland has, I want to realise it.

I am committed to keeping Northland on the map to keeping us front and centre.

To Northlanders I give you this promise I will work the hardest and the smartest that I can to achieve our dreams and our aspirations.

I’m proud to be a Northlander. I’m proud to be your MP.


Electorate accommodation could backfire on both parties

October 18, 2017

Is an electorate accommodation on offer in an effort to woo Winston Peters?

Many commentators think this will be his last term. That has been said    before and while each time it’s said he’s a bit older, there’s no certainty he’ll be any keener on retirement in 2020 than he has been before.

Whether or not he stands again, the party is at risk of slipping below the 5% threshold and out of parliament unless it wins a seat.

But even if Peters wants to contest another election, it’s unlikely he’d risk standing and not winning an electorate. He’s won three but also lost them, he won’t want to lose another.

His repeated criticism of National for allowing electorate accommodations for Act and United Future, would open him to criticism should he ask for one to give him a better chance. But doing what he’s criticised others for doing isn’t usually a problem for him.

However, the people of Northland tired of him in less than a term and voted for Matt King instead. He will spend the next three years doing the hard work a good electorate MP does and winning the loyalty of voters by doing so.

They are unlikely to show enthusiasm for ignoring that and voting Peters back in, even if they’re given a very strong message from National to do so.

Other electorates that have been suggested where National might stand aside are Whangarei and Wairarapa.

Accommodations worked in Ohariu and Epsom. But Peter Dunne already held Ohariu when National’s then leader Jim Bolger gave the wink and nod to voters to give his party the party vote but vote for Dunne as the electorate MP.

Act’s Rodney Hide didn’t need an accommodation to win Epsom the first time. He won the seat from Richard Worth without any help from National.

In successive elections, National’s candidate campaigned only for the party vote making it easier for Hide and then David Seymour to win the electorate vote.

But that is very different from asking voters to drop support for a sitting MP to allow a New Zealand First candidate to win the electorate.

There will be no enthusiasm for that from National members and absolutely no guarantee that enough voters would be prepared to turn their backs on their MP in favour of the NZ First candidate.

It would be a very risky move which could backfire on both parties.

 


Rural round-up

October 7, 2017

Time to end cartoon days for meat industry – Pam Tipa:

Meat Industry veteran Sir Graeme Harrison reckons the sector was summed up by a 1994 cartoon captioned, ‘we can’t see, we don’t hear and we don’t talk’.

“I think that is pretty typical of a lot of New Zealand’s export sector to be frank,” the ANZCO Foods Ltd founder and chairman told the recent ExportNZ conference in Auckland.

“Really what we’ve got to do is join hands and collaborate. That is certainly what ANZCO has done in its business relationships around the world.” . . 

Commodities and cost savings drive Fonterra’s performance – Keith Woodford:

Fonterra’s 2017 financial performance was a solid result, despite profits dropping 11 percent to $745 million. The main cause of the drop was the higher farm-gate price of milk supplied by its farmers, which is a cost to corporate Fonterra.

This farm-gate price is based on commodity returns and is largely beyond the control of Fonterra. The decline in profit would have been much greater if it were not for a six percent reduction in operating costs.

It is these operating cost savings which have fuelled the more than $5 million bonus payments this year to CEO Theo Spierings. These savings can be directly attributed to the so-called V3 strategy which was Spierings’ baby. . . 

Fonterra’s payout may be at risk after global dairy prices undershoot – Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Dairy prices undershot expectations in the overnight auction and some economists say it points to weaker demand and stronger supply, threatening Fonterra Cooperative Group’s forecast payout.

The NZX Dairy Derivatives market pointed to around a 5 percent lift but instead the GDT price index – which covers a variety of products and contract periods – fell 2.4 percent from the previous auction two weeks ago to US$3,223.

“The fall was a surprise and must be telling us something about demand that the market did not already know,” said Westpac Banking Corp chief economist Dominick Stephens. . . 

Meet the  new King of the North – Pam Tipa:

New National MP-elect for Northland Matt King, who took the seat off Winston Peters, is not taking anything for granted until the special votes are counted.

Although he is about 1300 votes ahead and has been told that is a safe margin, he will wait and see before making any big decisions.

They will include whether to lease out the 283ha beef farm at Okaihau that he bought only six months ago from his father, having leased it himself for the past 10 years. He has lived on the farm most of his life.

But he says there is no way he could give his best to his new role as an MP and continue to run the farm himself. . . 

Farm Plan focus in Central Hawke’s Bay:

Hawkes Bay Regional Council’s land advisors met with 34 Farm Plan providers in Waipawa on Wednesday to tackle the challenge of delivering 1,100 Central HB farm plans by 31 May 2018.

The regional council’s Tukituki Plan will lead to better water quality in the Tukituki catchment through land use practice improvements and landowner-led innovation. At this stage, the pressure is on individual landowners to commit to work with Farm Plan providers. The Farm Plans are not a solution in themselves, but spell out the adjustments to make to reduce individual farm impacts on the environment. . . 


Peters standing to give Invercargill MP at Northland’s expense

February 27, 2015

New Zealand First leader Winston Peters is standing in the Northland by-election.

. . . He said today that standing in the by-election was not an easy decision, but he had a long held concern for “Northland’s forgotten people”.

National had forgotten Northland for years, and the region was stagnating, Peters said. . .

He will be hoping that Northland voters have forgotten, or never knew, about the vagaries of MMP.

Should he win the seat he will become an electorate MP and the next person on NZ First’s list will get into parliament. That’s Ria Bond from Invercargill.

Quite how Peters will persuade the good people of Northland they will be represented by voting him in as an electorate MP with his reputation for talking big and doing little and in the process losing an MP from their end of the country and gifting parliament one from the other will remain to be seen.

Labour has confirmed Willow-Jean Prime as its candidate, and the Act Party will stand Whangarei orchardist Robin Grieve.

The Green Party and the Maori Party are not standing candidates.

If Labour sabotage their candidate in an attempt to unite opposition votes behind Peters it could happen.

Voters often punish the governing party in a by-election and a new candidate usually doesn’t attract the same level of votes a sitting one did.

The 2014 election results show:

NZ First didn’t bother standing a candidate in Northland last year. Mike Sabin won the seat for National with 18,269 votes and a majority of 9,300 over Prime who got 8,969 votes.

National gained 17,412 party votes; Labour got 5,913 and NZ First 4,546. the Green Party managed to get 3,855 votes and its candidate gained 3,639 votes.

National members in the electorate will select their candidate tomorrow.

The five in contention are: Grant McCallum, Mita Harris, Matt King, Mark Osborne and Karen Rolleston.

 

 

 

 

 


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