Rural round-up

Seeing women’s value on the farm – Sally Rae:

Noticing a gap in the sheep and beef sector, Bronwyn Campbell decided to do something to help address it.

She formed South Otago Women in Sheep and Beef — Partners in Business, which will hold its second session today in Balclutha.

The group’s formation came about after Mrs Campbell did an “Understanding Your Farming Business” course in Gore, run by the Agri Women’s Development Trust (AWDT). . .

Fonterra introduces global quality seal:

Fonterra is introducing a new global food quality seal – Trusted Goodness™ – for its products as part of its business strategy to add value to milk and maximise returns for its farmers.

Fonterra’s Chief Operating Officer, Global Consumer and Foodservice Jacqueline Chow, said that market research commissioned by Fonterra shows global consumers are prepared to pay a premium for high quality, safe and healthy food from trusted sources.

“Consumers want to know more about where their food comes from and that it is produced by businesses using sustainable and ethical practices. Consumers are actively seeking out products they can trust to feed their families and that come with these benefits.  . . 

 Agrarian revolution on its way – Richard Rennie:

As whole milk powder prices start to surge again farmers are being cautioned not to let that distract them from some of the biggest farm system disruptions the world has seen.

The world was on the verge of a new agrarian revolution, KPMG’s agribusiness head Ian Proudfoot told delegates at this year’s rural update agribusiness seminar.

It would result in practices done for generations being tipped on their head in a few years. “Don’t let the recent rise cloud your judgement. . . 

 Belief 20% Coast dairy farms up against wall:

About 20% of West Coast dairy farms could be in serious financial trouble, Federated Farmers heard at its quarterly meeting in Greymouth last week.

Provincial president Peter Langford said farmer sentiment was low given Westland Milk Products’ poor performance and many dairy farmers having had to borrow just to continue.

The upheaval and “negative thoughts” around Westland Milk management, governance and performance meant it was fair to say dairy farming, “with low and no payout” over the past two months, was difficult, he said.

Farmlands change – Sally Rae:

Hildathorpe farmer Chris Dennison has been elected to the Farmlands board, ousting long-serving director and fellow North Otago farmer John Foley.

Last month, Mr Dennison was critical of the co-operative’s performance after it posted a $9million loss, saying it appeared to have “lost its way”. The result of the South Island director election was announced at the company’s annual meeting in Christchurch on Tuesday.

Mr Dennison and his wife Kay run a 400ha arable farm with an adjacent dairy farm milking 800 cows on the lower Waitaki Plains. . . 

Talley’s add kale to healthy menu choice – Mike Watson:

Coal is not the only ‘crop’ Motueka-based food producer Talley’s has been investing in.

The company, which recently added coal mining to its list of investments, is also feeling its way with commercially grown kale for a mainly domestic consumer market.

For nearly 30 years Talley’s was synonymous with commercial pea growing in Marlborough.

The seafood, dairy, meat and vegetable processing company once harvested up to 1000ha of peas in the region. . . 

More grass and fewer cows equals more milk for Cloverdale Dairies – Heather Chalmers:

A pasture based system is paying off for Cloverdale Dairies owners Andrew and Nicky Watt, writes Heather Chalmers.

Despite managing one of the biggest dairy herds in Canterbury, Andrew and Nicky Watt definitely have their finger on the pulse, with their low-cost, pasture-based system consistently generating a business performance that is the envy of many.

Covering a five kilometre square block in the middle of the Canterbury Plains near Ashburton, Cloverdale Dairies runs almost 3000 cows and employs up to 22 staff in the peak of the season. . . .

 

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