Rural round-up

More environmental practices, say agricultural orgs – Jemma Brackebush:

DairyNZ and AgResearch have told MPs the next step for a major dairy research programme is for farmers to implement practices aimed at reducing their environmental footprint.

The five year programme, Pastoral 21, is funded by the Government and dairy industry bodies and focuses on finding systems that lift production and reduce nutrient loss.

DairyNZ’s strategy and investment leader Bruce Thorrold told MPs the programme comes to an end in 2016, so the next focus is getting five years’ of research and practices implemented behind the farm gate. . . 

Farmers keen on SFF deal – Annette Scott:

The Silver Fern Farms-Shanghai Maling investment needed scrutiny and had to stand up to that scrutiny, Fairlie sheep farmer Mark Adams said.

It was “mission critical” now to fully explain the proposal through the roadshow.

“And I look forward to that,” he said. . .

Trust celebrates 5 years:

The Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT) celebrated five years of developing the skills and confidence of more than 1000 women in agriculture this week.

The trust builds women’s business, leadership and governance skills through programmes and support delivered throughout New Zealand in partnership with industry.

Beginning with 11 participants in its first year, the trust now has 500 women a year taking part in its programmes, which range in duration from two days to 10 months. . . 

Fresh new partnership announced: Plant & Food Research joins United Fresh New Zealand Incorporated:

One of New Zealand’s largest scientific research organisations has joined United Fresh New Zealand Incorporated, the country’s only pan-produce organisation.

Plant & Food Research is now a member of United Fresh, which has 86 members from across the fresh produce value supply chain.

United Fresh General Manager, Paula Dudley, says the organisation is looking forward to continuing its work with the highly regarded scientific institute. . . 

Water quality issues and the sticky point of Ruataniwha tackled at WaterNZ conference:

“When it comes to water quality – are we playing a long game or a short game?” asked lawyer Helen Atkins, partner at specialist environmental law firm Atkins Holm Majurey, at Water New Zealand’s annual conference today.

In her presentation, Ms Atkins pointed to the Environmental Protection Agency Board of Inquiry process around the Ruataniwha applications. Ms Atkins talked about contradictory issues which have come about following the ‘infamous’ Ruataniwha legal decisions: . . 

SPCA Blue Tick encourages ethical farming:

Growing consumer demand for humanely farmed eggs and a new animal Code of Welfare will see battery cages for layer hens phased out by 2018, with a total ban by 2022.

RNZSPCA chief executive Ric Odom tackled the controversial topic of animal welfare on production farms at a recent Egg Industry Conference, using the opportunity to explain the objectives and strategy of the SPCA Blue Tick to the nation’s egg producers.

The SPCA Blue Tick is an audited accreditation scheme offering consumers a guarantee that the products they are choosing are humanely farmed. By purchasing these products, consumers support sound animal welfare and Kiwi farmers who provide their animals with a better quality of life. . . 

New A+ sustainability standard for aquaculture:

A new sustainability standards programme is helping promote and maximise the value of New Zealand aquaculture products, says Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

The A+ Environmental Sustainability Management Framework was officially launched today at the Aquaculture New Zealand conference. It is supported by funding from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Sustainable Farming Fund.

“This will help our products like salmon, mussels and oysters to stand out in the global market by showing the showing the highest standards of environmental sustainability,” says Mr Guy. . . 

More MPI frontline staff to protect New Zealand:

Nearly 50 new frontline staff will help the Ministry for Primary Industries to protect New Zealand.

The staff will graduate today at a ceremony at Auckland. They include 40 quarantine officers and seven fisheries officers.

The new quarantine officers will work at the border to halt risk goods that have the potential to carry pests or diseases, says Steve Gilbert, MPI’s Border Clearance Director. . . 

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