Word of the day

September 17, 2015

Tussie-mussie – a nosegay; small bunch of flowers or aromatic herbs, often with symbolic meanings;  cone-shaped holder for such a bouquet.


Rural round-up

September 17, 2015

Dairy price rise ‘green shoots’ – Dave Williams:

A third successive strong rise in dairy prices at auction has offered farmers the green shoots of a price recovery and set economists keying in more positive numbers into their calculators.

Fonterra’s GlobalDairyTrade auction price index jumped 16.5 percent to US$2568, with the company’s main commodity, whole milk powder, jumping 20.6 percent to US$2495.

It followed index rises of 14.8 percent and 10.9 percent but the BNZ warns it is off a very low base. . . 

Financial knowledge to help farmers have courageous conversations:

While the challenging times being faced by the dairy industry are largely outside farmers’ control, Dairy Women’s Network wants to remind farmers there are things they can do to empower themselves to minimise the negative impact on their businesses.

This includes having courageous conversations about the reality of their financial situations.

The Network is running free ‘Tracking the cash’ Dairy Modules throughout the country during October, November and December. . . 

Banks lift forecast dairy payouts as auction price rises:

Banks are upping their forecast dairy payouts on the back of a possible revival of fortunes for New Zealand’s struggling dairy industry.

The average overall price in the the overnight Global Dairy Trade auction rose 16.5 percent to $US2,568 per tonne.

Whole milk powder jumped 20.6 percent to $US2,495.

ASB has increased its forecast payout for the season to $5 a kilo. . . 

Last ditch effort to stop foreign Silver Fern buy in:

An industry group is appealing to the heads of Silver Fern Farms and the Alliance Group in a last-ditch attempt to stop foreign investment.

The farmer-led Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group has been trying to reform the red meat industry by blending the country’s two largest meat processors.

But, yesterday, Silver Fern Farms announced that China’s largest meat processor, Shanghai Maling, would inject $261 million into a new joint partnership.

MIE chairman and Southland sheep farmer Peter McDonald said farmers needed to shape their own future. . . 

Changes to commercial fishing catch limits:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has announced changes to commercial fishing limits in two areas as part of the annual fisheries sustainability review.

Catch limits for some gurnard, stargazer and rig stocks in the South Island have been increased where robust scientific information shows there has been an increase in abundance. The allowances for both recreational and commercial fishers will be increased as part of these decisions.

Total Allowable Catch limits have been decreased for the New Zealand hoki stock and the oreo stock on the Chatham Rise.

“A cautious approach has been taken for hoki given the low recent hoki biomass estimate in the Sub-Antarctic. The Total Allowable Catch for HOK1 will reduce from 161,640 tonnes to 151,540 tonnes for the 2015/16 fishing year,” says Mr Guy. . . 

Local tourism businesses asked to join fight to protect kauri:

The Coromandel Kauri Dieback Forum is seeking the help of Peninsula tourism operators and accommodation providers in protecting local kauri from the deadly kauri dieback disease, so the natural environment for which the Peninsula is famous for can be enjoyed by future generations.

The Forum is holding workshops specifically designed for the sector in Coromandel town at 2pm on Tuesday 22 September at Anchor Lodge and at 11am on Thursday 24 September at Ocean’s Resort in Whitianga. Everyone involved in a visitor-oriented business, from tourist attractions and activities through to accommodation providers of all types, is invited to attend the informal 1 ½ hour workshops, which will be run by Coromandel Adventures director Sarni Hart and Forum chairperson Vivienne Mclean. . .

Fish & Game vows ‘strong opposition’ to trout farming proposals:

Fish & Game has confirmed its strong opposition to commercial trout farming following revelations of a Bay of Plenty Regional Growth Study promoting, among other initiatives, the development of a commercial trout industry.

The study, which was undertaken to identify economic opportunities within the region, was commissioned by the Ministries of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) and Primary Industries (MPI) in partnership with the Bay of Connections.

Trout farming has been identified as a ‘key priority for regional development’ after the launch of the study, and the formulation of an action plan endorsed at a workshop involving more than 120 regional leaders and stakeholders. . .

And a video on the Story of Milk from Friesland Campina.


Thursday’s quiz

September 17, 2015

Lighter blogging still precludes me from setting the questions but anyone else is welcome to do so.

There’s no need to follow the five-question formula I used and anyone who stumps us all will win a virtual spring tussie-mussie.


Ministers say no to Lochinver sale

September 17, 2015

Ministers have declined an application by a foreign company to buy Lochinver Station:

An overseas company’s application to purchase Lochinver Station has been declined because the benefits to New Zealand are not substantial and identifiable, Ministers Paula Bennett and Louise Upston say.

Pure 100 Farm Ltd, a subsidiary of China-based Shanghai Pengxin, applied to the Overseas Investment Office (OIO) last year to buy the 13,800 ha farm near Taupo for $88 million.

“Because Lochinver Station is classified by law as sensitive land, Ministers must consider whether the application meets the requirements set out in the Overseas Investment Act,” Associate Finance Minister Paula Bennett says.

“While we recognise and support the importance of overseas investment, the Overseas Investment Act states it is a privilege for overseas people to own sensitive New Zealand assets and therefore requires such investments to meet statutory criteria for consent.

“After detailed and careful individual consideration, we are not satisfied there will be, or is likely to be, a substantial benefit to New Zealand – a key requirement for applications of sensitive land of this size.”

While the OIO said the question of whether the benefits of the potential investment to New Zealand are or could be substantial and identifiable was finely balanced, it recommended approving the application.

“We agreed parts of the proposed investment could benefit New Zealand but in our judgement on the overall balance of evidence, the benefits are not likely to be substantial and identifiable,” Land Information Minister Louise Upston says.

“This proposed sale didn’t pass a test we are required to exercise Ministerial judgement on.

“This is an example of our system working well.  The OIO conducted a thorough investigation before making a finely balanced recommendation.  Ministers carefully assessed the evidence and ultimately came to different view.”

A summary of the reasons for the Ministers’ decision can be found here.

This decision shows the bar for overseas ownership of farm land is set very high.

It is very difficult for a would-be foreign buyer to prove that it would provide more benefits than a local one, even if the local is hypothetical.

 


Quote of the day

September 17, 2015

. . . in the private sector we tend to listen to the shareholders of the company, not the competitors of the company, about whether something is good or bad for them.John Key


September 17 in history

September 17, 2015

1111 Highest Galician nobility led by Pedro Fróilaz de Traba and the bishop Diego Gelmírez crowned Alfonso VII as “King of Galicia“.

1176  The Battle of Myriokephalon.

1462  The Battle of Świecino (also known as the Battle of Żarnowiec) during Thirteen Years’ War.

1577  The Peace of Bergerac was signed between Henry III of France and the Huguenots.

1631  Sweden won a major victory at the Battle of Breitenfeld against the Holy Roman Empire during the Thirty Years War.

1683  Antonie van Leeuwenhoek wrote to the Royal Society describing “animalcules“: the first known description of protozoa.

1778  The Treaty of Fort Pitt was signed, the first formal treaty between the United States and a Native American tribe (the Lenape or Delaware Indians).

1787 The United States Constitution was signed in Philadelphia.

1809  Peace between Sweden and Russia in the Finnish War, the territory which became Finland was ceded to Russia by the Treaty of Fredrikshamn.

1859 Joshua A. Norton declared himself “Emperor Norton I” of the United States.

1862 American Civil War: George B. McClellan halted the northward drive of Robert E. Lee’s Confederate army in the single-day Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest day in American history.

1862  American Civil War: The Allegheny Arsenal explosion resulted in the single largest civilian disaster during the war.

1883 William Carlos Williams, American writer, was born (d. 1963).

1894  The Battle of Yalu River, the largest naval engagement of the First Sino-Japanese War.

1900  Philippine-American War: Filipinos under Juan Cailles defeated Americans under Colonel Benjamin F. Cheatham at Mabitac.

1908  The Wright Flyer flown by Orville Wright, with Lieutenant Thomas Selfridge as passenger, crashed killing Selfridge who became the first airoplane fatality.

1914  Andrew Fisher became Prime Minister of Australia for the third time.

1916 Mary Stewart, English novelist, was born (d. 2014).

1916   World War I: Manfred von Richthofen (“The Red Baron”), a flying ace of the German Luftstreitkräfte, won his first aerial combat near Cambrai, France.

1923 Hank Williams, American musician, was born (d. 1953).

1924  The Border Defence Corps was established in the Second Polish Republic for the defence of the eastern border against armed Soviet raids and local bandits.

1928  The Okeechobee Hurricane struck southeastern Florida, killing upwards of 2,500 people.

1929 Sir Stirling Moss, English race car driver, was born.

1931 Anne Bancroft, American actress, was born (d. 2005).

1939  World War II: A German U-boat U 29 sank the British aircraft carrierHMS Courageous.

1939  Taisto Mäki became the first man to run the 10,000 metres in under 30 minutes, in a time of 29:52.6.

1941 New Zealand abolished the death penalty for murder – for the time being.

Death penalty abolished...for the time being

1941  World War II: A decree of the Soviet State Committee of Defense, restoring Vsevobuch in the face of the Great Patriotic War, was issued

1944  World War II: Allied Airborne troops parachuted into the Netherlands as the “Market” half of Operation Market Garden.

1945 Bruce Spence, New Zealand actor, was born.

1948  The Lehi (also known as the Stern gang) assassinated Count Folke Bernadotte, who was appointed by the UN to mediate between the Arab nations and Israel.

1949 The Canadian steamship SS Noronic burned in Toronto Harbour with the loss of over 118 lives.

1956 Television was first broadcast in Australia.

1976 The first Space Shuttle, Enterprise, was unveiled by NASA.

1978  The Camp David Accords were signed by Israel and Egypt.

1980  After weeks of strikes at the Lenin Shipyard in Gdańsk, Poland, the nationwide independent trade union Solidarity was established.

1980 Former Nicaraguan President Anastasio Somoza Debayle was killed.

1983 Vanessa Williams became the first black Miss America.

1991 – The first version of the Linux kernel (0.01) was released to the Internet.

1992 An Iranian Kurdish leader and his two joiners were assassinated by political militants in Berlin.

1993 Last Russian troops left Poland.

2001  The New York Stock Exchange reopened for trading after the September 11 Attacks, the longest closure since the Great Depression.

2004 Tamil was declared the first classical language in India.

2006  Fourpeaked Mountain in Alaska erupted, marking the first eruption for the long-dormant volcano in at least 10,000 years.

2007  AOL, once the largest ISP in the U.S., officially announced plans to refocus the company as an advertising business and to relocate its corporate headquarters from Dulles, Virginia to New York.

2011 – Occupy Wall Street movement begins in Zucotti Park, New York City.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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