Rural round-up

December 21, 2015

Peterson Farm Bros's photo.

Proactive approach succeeds – Sally Rae:

When it comes to grappling with water-quality issues, Madeline Hall has a suggestion for farmers.

They need to take a pro-active role to think about rules coming in and ask themselves how they could be involved to help make it work, Ms Hall, an environmental sociology masters student at the University of Otago’s Centre for Sustainability, said.

Ms Hall has researched the social impact of a nutrient-reduction nitrogen-trading scheme on farming communities in the Lake Taupo basin. The innovative market-based environmental policy was established to address growing community concern about water quality. . . .

‘Fearless leadership’ urged – Sally Rae:

When Dutch couple Helen and Art Blom came to New Zealand in the mid-1990s, it was to be only a temporary stint.

The couple, who had studied agriculture at university in Holland, intended to work on a farm for a year.

But they ended up ‘‘staying forever”, Mrs Blom, who recently graduated from the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s 2015 Escalator programme, says, laughing. . . 

Summer vigil for biosecurity staff:

The latest border biosecurity boost will help the Ministry for Primary Industries manage a swarm of new international flights and passengers this summer.

Last week, 57 new biosecurity staff, including 24 detector dog teams, graduated from their training at a ceremony in Auckland.

MPI and other border agencies are gearing for the busiest summer ever, says Steve Gilbert, MPI’s Border Clearance Director. . . 

Pest control firm praises ‘exemplary’ 1080 investigation:

Animal Control Products (ACP), the State-Owned Enterprise that imports 1080 and manufactures 1080 bait products for pest control in New Zealand, today congratulated the Police on arresting and charging the blackmailer who threatened to contaminate infant formula with 1080 poison.

Chief executive William McCook said ACP was pleased to have been able to assist the Police with their investigation, in particular with some of the technical and historical aspects of their investigation.

He said the Police had done an exemplary job in tracking down and bringing the blackmailer to justice, and that the Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI) approach to protecting consumers and ensuring infant formula was safe was well-coordinated. . .

Upgraded Hooker Valley track opens:

A newly completed upgrade of Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park’s popular Hooker Valley track makes it easier for visitors to experience the spectacle of New Zealand’s highest mountains, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.
Ms Barry officially opened the improved track at a ceremony outside Mt Cook Village today.

The $1.7 million project means the track is less prone to flooding, avoids potential avalanche and rockfall areas and is more accessible for walkers. . .

AgriFoodNZ Setting Up To Invest in New Zealand’s Food & Beverage Sector

Signs Memorandum of Understanding with Bank of China NZ

The Bank of China (NZ) and AgriFoodNZ have today announced that they have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to help New Zealand food and beverage companies seeking to gain access to investment capital and expertise in marketing and distributing product and services in China.

AgriFoodNZ (Food & Agricultural Trading New Zealand Limited) was recently formed to facilitate investment and enhance the marketing and distribution capability of New Zealand food and beverage products.

Macri ditches wheat, corn, beef export taxes:

The [Argentinean] national government has finally announced one of its pledges during the campaign: the total removal of export taxes for regional economies and a cut of the soy bean export tax by 5%.

Soy bean export taxes will be reduced from 35 percent to 30 percent while corn, wheat and meat export taxes will be totally removed.

“The day has come and I had asked you to hold on,” Macri said during a speech delivered in the Buenos Aires city of Pergamino where he made the announcement, escorted by Buenos Aires governor María Eugenia Vidal, Agricultural Minister Ricardo Buryaile, Interior Minister Rogelio Frigeroi and Let’s Change Senators Carlos Reutemann and Alfredo de Angeli, among other officials.

He called to “launch a new phase together” adding “without the agricultural sector the country won’t move forward.” . . .

Student has made $40,000 profit selling baby formula to buyers in China – and says he is doing nothing wrong ‘because every child deserves access to the food’ –  Liam Quinn:

A student has revealed how he made more than $40,000 selling baby formula to China.

The young student, who did not reveal where he lives in Australia, said he got into the lucrative market after a Chinese friend returned to the country late in 2014.

Just weeks later, he was selling his first can and making a measly $1.50 profit, but it was the start of a huge pay-day. . .


Rural round-up

September 28, 2015

Freehold on Mackenzie Crown land not an easy ticket to millions, farmers say – Tim Fulton:

Farmers accused of making big profits from Crown land deals in the Mackenzie Basin say they are doing the bare minimum to make a living.

High Country property researcher and Lincoln University academic Dr Ann Brower says the Crown is missing out when tenure review land is sold freehold by farmers.

The median on-selling price per hectare was 493 times the Crown’s original sale price, she said. . .

Signs of movement on dairy as TPP negotiators meet in Atlanta – Pattrick Smellie:

(BusinessDesk) – News media in the US and Canada are reporting signs of a deal coming together on access for dairy products into North America as trade ministers gather in Atlanta, Georgia, for the latest round of talks attempting to conclude the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade and investment pact.

The Atlanta talks are being billed as potentially the final round of talks, although New Zealand Trade Minister Tim Groser has yet to commit to attend them, despite being in the US this week for climate change talks in New York.

He said almost a week ago that there was still no adequate offer from the key TPP dairy-producing countries – the US, Canada and Japan. Market access for dairy products and automobiles, and patent extensions for new generation bio-logic pharmaceuticals, are reportedly the only remaining sticking points of substance between the 12 countries negotiating the new Pacific Rim agreement, which US president Barack Obama is committed to concluding as part of a strategy to assert US geopolitical interests in Asia and counter the rise of China. . . 

No heavy hand – Neal Wallace:

Shanghai Maling president Shen Wei Ping has given an assurance he will not use his casting vote to exert control over Silver Fern Farms should shareholders agree to a partnership between the two food companies.

In an interview during a visit to Dunedin, Shen said the clause giving the Shanghai Maling Aquarius chairman the casting vote on the appointment of the chief executive and annual business plan, was an auditor requirement for reporting the company’s financial results.

He said the proposed deal between the Chinese company and SFF would be a true partnership with board decisions by consensus. . . 

Taggart returned as Ballance director:

Murray Taggart has been returned as a Ballance Agri-Nutrients Ward C director in the South Island after a three-way contest for the position.

Also seeking the directorship were Temuka intensive cropping and livestock finishing farmer Nick Ward and former chief executive of Silver Fern Farms Keith Cooper.

Mr Taggart, who is also chairman of meat co-operative Alliance Group, joined the Ballance board in 2009. He is a past director of CRT Society and Southern Farms NZ, past chairman of the National Meat and Wool Council and Federated Farmers, and past member of the National Board of Federated Farmers. . . 

Generic marketing questioned – Matthew Cawood:

WHEN you have powerful brands, do you need generic marketing?

Agrifood consultant David McKinna posed that rhetorical question to the recent 2015 Meat Industry Conference as part of his discussion on the rise of brand marketing.

“You don’t see your breakfast cereal in generic marketing campaigns. You don’t see generic campaigns for toothpaste. The brands do the job,” he said.

“Your industry has spent a lot of money on generic marketing. As they say in advertising, fifty per cent of it works, but we don’t know which bit.”

Dr McKinna foresees a future in which generic marketing takes a back seat, but doesn’t disappear entirely.  . . 

Government delivers National Policy Direction for Pest Management:

The National Policy Direction for Pest Management has come into effect.

MPI’s director of biosecurity and animal welfare policy, Julie Collins, says established pests are estimated to cost New Zealand’s primary sector up to $3.3 billion annually.

“Even small improvements to New Zealand’s pest management system could save millions of dollars in the long term.”

“The National Direction will support national and regional management of challenging pest issues such as wilding conifers, by ensuring consistent approaches to the way rules are set across New Zealand and that landowner obligations are clearly signalled and underpinned by robust analysis.” . . 

Wendy Harker making Holstein history in NZ – Sonita Chandar:

She may have made history by being elected the first female head of Holstein Friesian New Zealand but the new president says it will not define who she is or what she does.

Wendy Harker, a Te Awamutu breeder, is the first woman to take on the top role in the association’s 105-year history.  She has sat on the board for six years as a council member.

“I have been a part of the national team for six years,” she says. . .

Connie Sue Farmer-Wollenberg's photo.


Rural round up

September 25, 2015

AgResearch confirms 83 lay-offs, hires 27 for new roles – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – AgResearch has confirmed speculation it is axing jobs, announcing plans to lay off 83 scientists and technicians because of declining investment in some areas of research and development, while hiring 27 for new roles.

AgResearch chair Sam Robinson said the Waikato-based crown research institute had to balance shifts in its sector’s research needs, and therefore revenue, with the need to respond to emerging science opportunities to maximise the impact for New Zealand’s pastoral sector.

“Declining R&D investment in some areas means that we are currently facing a significant and ongoing funding challenge in those areas,” he said. “While both private sector and government revenue is increasing in other areas, our net science revenue is forecast to be $5.3 million less for FY16 compared to FY15,” he said. . . 

Federated Farmers disappointed with AgResearch redundancies:

Further job cuts at AgResearch back up Federated Farmers concern that science capability in agriculture continues to be eroded through inadequate funding and a lack of strategic planning.

“Agriculture science is a long term investment which is difficult for governments on a short term three year election cycle, but we owe it to our future farmers, and all New Zealanders, to make the investments now, develop our capability and build the basic sciences which provide the necessary grunt to ensure commercialisation of innovation is optimised,” says Federated Farmers President Dr William Rolleston.

“We appreciate that AgResearch needs to ensure its capacity aligns with the work it has ahead of it, but the continual downsizing at AgResearch is a symptom of this bigger problem.” . . 

Napier road washout cancels wedding, isolates farmers – Simon Wong:

A wedding at a remote venue near Napier has been forced to cancel after heavy rain washed out the only road to the site.

McVicar Rd, which runs along the Mohaka River in Te Haroto, has cut off the 10 permanent residents including farmer and Sensible Sentencing Trust founder Garth McVicar.

The only road to his farm and the neighbouring Mountain Valley Adventure Lodge, where the wedding was to be held this weekend, has been completely washed out. . . 

Are microbes the key to geographical differences in wine?:

A new study of six of New Zealand’s major wine-growing regions has found that differences in flavour and aroma of wine from different areas may depend more on microbes than was previously thought.

Classically the reason that wine, and other agricultural crops such as coffee, from different places tastes and smells different was thought to be due to a range of environmental reasons such as climate and soil minerals. The idea that organisms such as microbes played a role in this was not appreciated until very recently.

Previous work by Associate Professor Mat Goddard and Research Fellow Sarah Knight from the School of Biological Sciences published in Nature’s microbial ecology journal ISME demonstrated that different regions of New Zealand have different types of the main yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that ferment juice into wine. . . 

Positive Psa-V result on Whangarei kiwifruit orchard:

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has received a Psa-V positive test result on Hort16A and male vines on a kiwifruit orchard in Whangarei. This is the first confirmed case of Psa-V on an orchard in the Whangarei region.

All growers in the region have been advised of the situation by KVH, including best-practice advice going forward. KVH will hold a meeting for Whangarei growers next week and will be carrying out extensive monitoring in the region over the weekend.

There are a total of 49 orchards in the Whangarei region comprising of approximately 144 canopy hectares.

KVH Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, said this new find in Whangarei is very disappointing and will be particularly hard for local growers and the regional committee. . . 

Minister welcomes passage of Korea FTA Bill:

Trade Minister Tim Groser has welcomed the passing of the Tariff (Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and the Republic of Korea) Amendment Bill in Parliament today.

“Under this FTA, approximately 98 percent of tariffs on New Zealand’s current exports to Korea will be progressively eliminated,” says Mr Groser.

“This FTA will play an important role in strengthening the relationship between New Zealand and Korea. It delivers significant benefits across a range of areas including goods, services, and investment by breaking down trade barriers, facilitating the movement of goods and services, and establishing a framework for resolving any trade-related issues in the future. . . 

Zespri looks forward to sales growth in South Korea following passage of Tariff Amendment Bill:

Zespri welcomes the passage of the Tariff Amendment Bill through parliament yesterday, which is a significant step towards the implementation of the Free Trade Agreement (FTA) with South Korea. The agreement will provide significant benefit for the New Zealand kiwifruit industry.

Ratification of the FTA this year would mean a 33% reduction in tariffs on exports of New Zealand kiwifruit to South Korea for next year’s kiwifruit season. During 2014, Zespri growers paid approximately $22 million in tariffs, with the rate set at 45 percent. The tariff for kiwifruit will reduce to zero over the next five years. . . 

Tariff Amendment Bill a Significant Win for Kiwifruit Growers:

New Zealand Kiwifruit Growers Inc. (NZKGI) welcomes yesterday’s passing of the Tariff Amendment Bill in parliament – a positive step toward a Free Trade Agreement with South Korea.

NZKGI president Neil Trebilco said cutting the tariff is a big win for kiwifruit growers.

“The agreement will eliminate a 45 per cent tariff on New Zealand kiwifruit over five years, creating significant savings for growers.”

“The agreement will also bring about parity with Chilean competitors who have been on a zero tariff since concluding their own Free Trade Agreement in 2004.” . . 

Fastline's photo.
Not just during harvest and not just farmers – many who service and supply farmers and work in businesses which turn what comes off the paddock in to what’s put on the plate, also work long and irregular hours. And of course, lots of other people work long and irregular hours in lots of other jobs.


Rural round-up

September 19, 2015

More environmental practices, say agricultural orgs – Jemma Brackebush:

DairyNZ and AgResearch have told MPs the next step for a major dairy research programme is for farmers to implement practices aimed at reducing their environmental footprint.

The five year programme, Pastoral 21, is funded by the Government and dairy industry bodies and focuses on finding systems that lift production and reduce nutrient loss.

DairyNZ’s strategy and investment leader Bruce Thorrold told MPs the programme comes to an end in 2016, so the next focus is getting five years’ of research and practices implemented behind the farm gate. . . 

Farmers keen on SFF deal – Annette Scott:

The Silver Fern Farms-Shanghai Maling investment needed scrutiny and had to stand up to that scrutiny, Fairlie sheep farmer Mark Adams said.

It was “mission critical” now to fully explain the proposal through the roadshow.

“And I look forward to that,” he said. . .

Trust celebrates 5 years:

The Agri-Women’s Development Trust (AWDT) celebrated five years of developing the skills and confidence of more than 1000 women in agriculture this week.

The trust builds women’s business, leadership and governance skills through programmes and support delivered throughout New Zealand in partnership with industry.

Beginning with 11 participants in its first year, the trust now has 500 women a year taking part in its programmes, which range in duration from two days to 10 months. . . 

Fresh new partnership announced: Plant & Food Research joins United Fresh New Zealand Incorporated:

One of New Zealand’s largest scientific research organisations has joined United Fresh New Zealand Incorporated, the country’s only pan-produce organisation.

Plant & Food Research is now a member of United Fresh, which has 86 members from across the fresh produce value supply chain.

United Fresh General Manager, Paula Dudley, says the organisation is looking forward to continuing its work with the highly regarded scientific institute. . . 

Water quality issues and the sticky point of Ruataniwha tackled at WaterNZ conference:

“When it comes to water quality – are we playing a long game or a short game?” asked lawyer Helen Atkins, partner at specialist environmental law firm Atkins Holm Majurey, at Water New Zealand’s annual conference today.

In her presentation, Ms Atkins pointed to the Environmental Protection Agency Board of Inquiry process around the Ruataniwha applications. Ms Atkins talked about contradictory issues which have come about following the ‘infamous’ Ruataniwha legal decisions: . . 

SPCA Blue Tick encourages ethical farming:

Growing consumer demand for humanely farmed eggs and a new animal Code of Welfare will see battery cages for layer hens phased out by 2018, with a total ban by 2022.

RNZSPCA chief executive Ric Odom tackled the controversial topic of animal welfare on production farms at a recent Egg Industry Conference, using the opportunity to explain the objectives and strategy of the SPCA Blue Tick to the nation’s egg producers.

The SPCA Blue Tick is an audited accreditation scheme offering consumers a guarantee that the products they are choosing are humanely farmed. By purchasing these products, consumers support sound animal welfare and Kiwi farmers who provide their animals with a better quality of life. . . 

New A+ sustainability standard for aquaculture:

A new sustainability standards programme is helping promote and maximise the value of New Zealand aquaculture products, says Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy.

The A+ Environmental Sustainability Management Framework was officially launched today at the Aquaculture New Zealand conference. It is supported by funding from the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) Sustainable Farming Fund.

“This will help our products like salmon, mussels and oysters to stand out in the global market by showing the showing the highest standards of environmental sustainability,” says Mr Guy. . . 

More MPI frontline staff to protect New Zealand:

Nearly 50 new frontline staff will help the Ministry for Primary Industries to protect New Zealand.

The staff will graduate today at a ceremony at Auckland. They include 40 quarantine officers and seven fisheries officers.

The new quarantine officers will work at the border to halt risk goods that have the potential to carry pests or diseases, says Steve Gilbert, MPI’s Border Clearance Director. . . 


Rural round-up

September 11, 2015

Sheep and beef farmers to benefit from weaker NZD:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand’s Economic Service released its New Season Outlook 2015-16 today. It predicts the average sheep and beef farm in New Zealand will see its profit before tax lift to $109,900 this season – 9.6 per cent more than last season, but 3.1 per cent below the five-year average.

B+LNZ Chief Economist Andrew Burtt says this is positive news, at a time when the New Zealand economy will benefit from increased farm sector spending.

“This season, New Zealand’s 12,300 commercial sheep and beef farmers will spend a total of $4.66 billion on fertiliser, interest, repairs and maintenance and general farm operating costs. This will be welcomed by rural suppliers and communities, particularly at this time.” . . 

Techno lucerne: getting the best out of bulls – Kate Taylor:

Nothing spells out spring more than lambs and daffodils.

You won’t find many woolly creatures on the Central Hawke’s Bay farm of Angus and Esther Mabin, apart from the ones keeping the grass down in the home paddock.

You will find daffodils though. Thousands of them planted across more than 8ha by Angus’ Mum Railene over 40 years and now sold as a fundraiser for CHB Plunket. Every September, giant-sized daffodil signs grace the side of SH2 south of Waipukurau and locals and visitors swarm to the farm known as Taniwha. . . 

Will ants bee the saviours of our hives? – Alexa Cook:

Scientists have discovered a new ant virus related to the deformed wing virus, which kills honey bees.

Bees and ants often forage together, and may be capable of passing on diseases to each other.

The new virus is carried by Argentine ants, which are one of New Zealand’s major bee pests.

The ants already carry a deformed wing virus, which can cause bee colony collapses. . .

Silver Fern Farms ‘strategic’ not even close – Gravedodger:

The entire  NZ Meat Industry may qualify in that category but there is absolutely nothing about a farmer supplier owned part player processor, I hesitate to call them marketer, in the meat industry to what I understand Strategic to involve.

Yes there is farmer supplier investment  in SFF and if the whole shambolic outfit went broke tomorrow it would have some dire effects for many but in the absence of any significant new meatworks being created, those that were built in the latter years of last century have all outlived the planned obsolescence and the older ones are more relics than meatplants.

The entire meat industry since the “Dunedin” departed New Zealand waters with the first refrigerated cargo of meat for the UK over 130 years ago, is littered with incompetence and manipulations bordering on fraud as aspiring entrepreneurs attempted to make their fortune. . . 

New great walk to be ‘one of the best‘ – Paul Taylor:

The Department of Conservation is working on plans for a Great Walk near Queenstown, the country’s 10th.

The proposed three day route is through the spectacular scenery of nearby Mt Creighton Station.

The ”Moonlight Trail” is part of a mooted trade off between the Government and the company which owns the perpetual lease for the 15,000ha station. . . 

New Zealand Winegrowers launches consumer focused education programme in China:

The New Zealand Wine Intermediate Certificate was launched in Shanghai last week, giving Chinese wine consumers the chance to learn about New Zealand’s diverse wine styles.

The education programme was developed by New Zealand Winegrowers and New Zealand Trade & Enterprise in response to a growing demand for information about New Zealand wine from consumers across China.

“This certificate has been several years in the making. We are working with New Zealand based Master of Wine Jane Skilton and her team at the New Zealand School of Wines & Spirits, whose experience will prove invaluable” said Chris Yorke, Global Marketing Director at New Zealand Winegrowers. “Education plays a huge part in our marketing strategy for China, and the launch of a programme specially tailored for consumers will help raise awareness and appreciation of our premium wines in a growing market.” . . 

Watch your back this spring:

Sheep farmers busy with tailing/docking of lambs are being urged to take extra care of their backs.

With spring comes more stock handling,” says Al McCone, WorkSafe’s Agriculture Programme Manager. “Injuries often happen when people do routine tasks like tailing/docking over and over again. Before you or your workers start any job on the farm, stop and consider what you need to watch out for and how to get it done safely.”

In September last year, people working on farms made 600 claims qualifying for ACC funding for back injuries. In addition to injuries suffered as a result of tailing/docking work, other back-related injuries came from kicks or crushing by animals, slips, trips and falls, and injuries from vehicles and heavy machinery. . . 

True Dairy Trainees Targeted in Contest Revamp:

Changes to the 2016 New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competition will give genuine dairy trainees the opportunity to succeed.

National Convenor Chris Keeping says the entry criteria in the dairy trainee competition has been tightened to ensure it caters for young people, who have less experience and qualifications than other potential new entrants to the dairy industry.

“The dairy trainee contest aims to foster and assist new people coming into the industry to gain the skills, knowledge and reputation they need to progress,” Mrs Keeping says. . . 

2015 New Zealand Extra Virgin Olive Oil Awards:

Entries in New Zealand’s most prestigious competition for extra virgin olive oil closed on Wednesday 9th September, with a total of 70 entries. There were 60 entries in the Extra Virgin classes and 10 entries in the Flavoured Oil classes, which are new classes for these Awards.

The 2015 New Zealand Extra Virgin Olive Oil Awards have attracted entries from all of the major olive growing regions across the country. . .

Save on calf rearing this season:

Weaning calves from milk when they reach 65 kilograms could add to the bottom line if a good value meal and pasture is added to the diet early on – especially when it comes to replacement heifers.

Wendy Morgan, Nutrition and Quality Manager at animal nutrition company SealesWinslow said the cost of rearing calves can be reviewed by farmers who are looking for ways to make cost savings this season.

“To wean from milk, start weighing calves at six weeks of age. An animal can be weaned once it has reached 65 kilograms, has an obvious rumen (a pot belly when looking at it from behind) and is eating 1 kilogram of meal for three consecutive days,” she said. . .

The Global Forest Industry in the 2Q/2015:

Excerpts from the Wood Resource Quarterly (www.woodprices.com)

Global Timber Markets:

Sawlog prices fell again in the 2Q/15 in most of the 19 regions worldwide that are part of the Global Sawlog Price Index (GSPI). The Index is at its lowest level since 2009, and is down 20% from its all-time high four years go.The only regions where prices increased in the 2Q were in Northwest Russia andthe Interior of British Columbia.

Global trade of softwood roundwood slowed down towards the end of 2014 and log shipments have continued to be slow during the first half of 2015, with the biggest reduction in imports being in Japan, South Korea and Sweden. . . 

Increased cruise ship biosecurity a welcome result for kiwifruit:

The Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI) announcement to beef up biosecurity on incoming cruise ships is a welcome result for the kiwifruit industry.

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) Chief Executive, Barry O’Neil, says KVH has been working with MPI for increased border interventions on the cruise ship pathway, and supports the work being done to address the increasing risks.

“The cruise ship pathway is one the kiwifruit industry is concerned about so we are fully supportive of MPI’s proactive approach following a cruise ship passenger risk review.” . . 


Rural round-up

September 10, 2015

Number of TB infected herd numbers at all-time record low:

The number of bovine tuberculosis (TB) infected herds has dropped below 40 for the first time in the history of New Zealand’s TBfree programme delivered by OSPRI. According to this week’s figures, an all-time low of 36 herds were infected with bovine TB (34 cattle and two deer herds).

OSPRI Chief Executive, Michelle Edge, said ‘Reaching this milestone is a credit to farmers and the industry and Government organisations that are shareholders and investors in the TBfree programme and is a big step towards New Zealand becoming TB-free.’

Farmers, industry and Government partners working hand-in-hand with OSPRI have collaboratively made the programme one of the world’s leading TB control schemes. . . 

New Zealand’s Precision Seafood Harvesting Finalist In Global Seafood Champion Awards:

The new Precision Seafood Harvesting fishing technology being developed in New Zealand has today been announced as a finalist in Seaweb’s Seafood Champion Awards at Seafood Expo Asia in Hong Kong.

The Seafood Champion Awards annually recognise individuals and companies for outstanding leadership in promoting environmentally responsible seafood. PSH is a finalist in the Innovation category, which recognises efforts in advancing sustainability within the global seafood sector to effectively design products and processes with sustainability as a driving force. . . 

New Zealand Ambassador to Chair WTO Agriculture Negotiations

Trade Minister Tim Groser announced today that the members of the World Trade Organisation have appointed New Zealand’s WTO Ambassador, Vangelis Vitalis, as the new Chair of the WTO Doha Round agriculture negotiations.

Mr Vitalis was formally elected Chair at a meeting of the Special Session of the Committee on Agriculture held in Geneva today.

“I am very pleased that the WTO membership have once again underlined their trust and confidence in New Zealand’s WTO Ambassador for the role as Chair of the agriculture negotiations”, Mr Groser said. . . 

 

Fonterra Milk Volume Forecast:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited has maintained its milk volume forecast for the 2015-16 season at 1,589 million kgMS, which is in the range of 2-3 per cent lower than the amount collected last season.

Fonterra is required under the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act to update its current season forecast milk volumes by early September.

Group Director Co-operative Affairs Miles Hurrell said although Fonterra had forecast a 2-3 per cent decline in volumes there was evidence that farmers were pulling back on production, which could lead to a further downward revision of forecast volumes as we move through the season.

“Farmers are responding to the lower forecast Farmgate Milk Price by returning to more traditional farming practices. They are reducing the use of feed supplements, and lowering stocking rates per hectare as they concentrate on utilising pasture. . . 

 

Too many eggs in the whole milk powder (WMP) basket – Keith Woodford:

For some time there has been a view developing within New Zealand that we have too many eggs in the dairy basket. There is also a view that we are over-exposed to China.

I do not share those perspectives, at least when they are expressed in such over-arching and simplistic terms. In contrast, I note that dairy is one of the things we are good at, and that our pastoral dairy resources are not easily put to alternative profitable use.

Yes, we could go back to sheep production, but I do not know where we would profitably sell the increased meat volumes. For beef, there are markets, but most of our beef is a by-product of dairy. It is hard to make money from beef cows. . . 

Fonterra Opens New Manufacturing Facility In Indonesia:

Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited has officially opened its new blending and packing plant in Indonesia – its first manufacturing facility in the country.

Chairman John Wilson said the plant is Fonterra’s largest investment in ASEAN in the last decade and will support the growth of Fonterra’s brands – Anmum, Anlene and Anchor Boneeto – in Indonesia.

“Fonterra has been supplying high quality dairy nutrition to Indonesia for more than 30 years and today it is one of our most important global markets. The opening of our new plant is an exciting step forward in our relationship with the country and local dairy industry,” he said. . . 

Dairy Women’s Network conference details announced:

Dairy Women’s Network has decided to take its cue from the dairy industry and curtail its next annual conference, at a time that the industry and its members are hurting.

The Network had planned to hold the 2016 conference in Wellington over two full days in May.

“The Wellington location would have meant more people from the North Island needed to fly than if we held it in a central North Island location,” said de Villiers. . .

MPI and cruise industry to combat fruit fly risk:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) will work closely with the cruise ship industry this season to manage biosecurity risk, especially fruit fly.

The cruise sector is expecting a record season, with passenger numbers forecast to jump 33% to 267,800.

“This, coupled with the enhanced fruit fly threat across the Tasman and other parts of the Pacific, has brought MPI and the cruise industry together to improve biosecurity,” says Stephanie Rowe, MPI’s Head of Intelligence and Operations. . . 


Rural round-up

June 28, 2015

Strategic positioning down on the dairy farm – Keith Woodford:

Right now, everyone in the New Zealand dairy industry is figuring out how to get through the next 12 months without too much pain. But eventually events will turn and we will be able to think more strategically about where the industry is going.

Down on the farm, the big long term issue will be how to remain profitable while living in the new world of nutrient emission limits.

There are two ways to go. One is to farm within an all-grass system, but pull back the stocking rate and other inputs such as nitrogen fertiliser and supplementary feed. Some of the environmentally-focused people are arguing that this is the way to go, and within industry organisation DairyNZ there is a strongly held viewpoint that all-grass is where our competitive advantage lies. . .

 

Tukituki decision a win-win for environment & economy:

Federated Farmers is pleased the Tukituki Catchment Proposal Board of Inquiry has released a decision that has allowed for both the environment and economy to prosper.

The Catchment Proposal Board of Inquiry has decided to let the Ruataniwha Dam go ahead with some amendments to the conditions around nutrient management.

Ian Mackenzie, Federated Farmers water and environment spokesperson says “We are pleased the process is finally over and are 100 percent behind the Ruataniwha Dam project going ahead for the reasons that water storage is good for the environment and the economy.” . .

 

Unprecedented support for North Canterbury:

In an unprecedented first, a group of North Canterbury stock agents and meat processors have agreed to collectively work together with Federated Farmers as the coordinator and the Rural Support Trust to help farmers affected by the drought for the good of the industry.

As feed supplies in the province dwindle large numbers of stock have to be relocated elsewhere or other solutions need to be found. 

Dan Hodgen, Federated Farmers North Canterbury Meat & Fibre Chair says “The commitment from these groups to work together to help drought affected farmers is really encouraging and I thank them for it. This hasn’t happened before and it reflects how serious the situation is heading into lambing and calving.” . . .

Biosecurity pups named Fudge and Fritz:

Fudge (girl) and Fritz (boy) are the winning names for two new biosecurity detector puppies that have been especially bred to stop pests and diseases from entering New Zealand.

The Ministry for Primary Industries announced the beagle names today after running a public competition to name two puppies from its “F-litter”.

“Both names were popular choices among the entrants, and they meet our requirements for names that are short and easy to remember,” says MPI Detection Technology Manager Brett Hickman. . .

 

Aussie farmers plant more Monsanto’s GM canola:

Australian farmers continue to embrace GM technology in greater numbers and have now planted more than 1.5 million hectares of Monsanto’s Roundup Ready® canola since its introduction in 2008.
 
Despite an expected 9% drop in the size of this season’s overall canola crop, local growers have purchased a record one million tonnes of Roundup Ready canola seed, up 15% on last season.
 
More than 436,000 hectares of GM canola will be planted this year, up from nearly 350,000 hectares last year. GM canola varieties now make up 22% of the canola planted in the states that allow GM canola to be grown – Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales. . .

Horticultural Industry Celebrates Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower Success:

More than 280 people from around the horticultural industry came together last night to celebrate the 2015 Bay of Plenty Young Fruit Grower competition which saw 26 year old Craig Ward from Apata take out the 2015 title at a sold-out gala dinner.

Craig beat seven other competitors in a series of competitive events and tests during the day and a quiz and speech competition in the evening. Craig will now go on to represent the Bay of Plenty at the national competition run by Horticulture New Zealand in Christchurch on 12-13 August.

This year’s competition received a huge amount of support from the horticultural industry through sponsorship and other contributions. . . .

 


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