Word of the day

September 23, 2015

Oligopoly – a state of limited competition, in which a market is shared by a small number of producers or sellers; a situation in which a particular market is controlled by a small group of firms.


Rural round-up

September 23, 2015

Drought breaks in Cheviot North Canterbury – Jeff Hampton:

 Much-needed rain fell in parched parts of north Canterbury today, raising farmers’ hopes that the serious drought they’re battling may be about to end.

It’s vital for farmers in an area of north Canterbury near Cheviot to get decent rainfall if their spring grass is to grow.

Farmer Louisa McClintock is never happier when there’s a bit of rain, after her district has been in drought all year. . . 

[I think that headline is more than a little optimistic. The rain will have been very welcome but it takes more than an inch or so of rain to break a drought].

Farmers suffer in drought-stricken corner of North Canterbury – Michael Wright:

Dan Hodgen must think the weather gods are against him.

The Hawarden farmer received “about one millimetre” of rain on his drought-stricken north Canterbury property at the weekend, despite solid falls being predicted.

“I’ve given up on trusting the forecast,” he said. . . 

Hard working couple take on velvet challenge – Kate Taylor:

In just seven years, Josh and Penny Buckman have graduated university and built up enough capital to buy 82 hectares near Hastings and a deer velvet business, not to mention starting a family.

They are busy people who wouldn’t have it any other way and are proud of their achievements so far.

“Josh is always up at midnight… thinking, planning. He’s an ideas man. He’s always working through ideas and scenarios and things we can do,” Penny says.

She is in charge of the daily running of Gevir Premium Deer Velvet, which they bought from another Hawke’s Bay couple earlier this year. She is also in charge of three-year-old George, 3, and 11-month-old Anna-Louise. Josh works on contract for Marsh corporate and business insurance and oversees the farm and a nearby lease block. The couple also have shares in other businesses. . . 

Saying goodbye to dirty dairy farming –  Lachlan Forsyth:

How do you achieve the balance between keeping a farm economical, and keeping the environment healthy? Is it actually doable?

Dairy has had many decades of being very good on the economics and not so good on the environment, and now there is a huge amount of pressure to ensure that changes.

Story visited one award-winning Waikato farm to see what’s being done to clean up dairy’s act. . . 

Key defends AgResearch cuts:

Prime Minister John Key is defending the government’s attitude to research and development amid reports that AgResearch intends laying off science staff.

Waikato University agribusiness professor Jacqueline Rowarth says she’s been told the cuts could involve 20 percent of the 500 or so research staff.

Prof Rowarth says she was originally told 82 staff were being laid off but the number had shifted to between 80 and 100.

Former AgResearch scientist Doug Edmeades says he’s been told by a staff member redundancies will be announced on Thursday, and the cuts are due to a drop in funding. . . .

New plant-based milk product under development:

The milk company, Miraka, is working with science and research organisations to create a new UHT milk product using plant-based protein.

Taupo-based Miraka is a predominately Māori-owned company that manufactures milk powder and UHT milk products for export to 23 countries in Africa, the Middle East, Asia, the Pacific, and Latin America.

It’s been awarded government funding to work with AgResearch and Plant and Food to develop dairy-based UHT milk products which contain plant or vegetable materials.

Chief executive Richard Wyeth said the scope is broad at this stage, but he wouldn’t be drawn on the ideas that are being thrown around. . . 

Farmers told to limit palm kernel feed:

Fonterra is encouraging farmers to limit the amount of palm kernel extract (PKE) they use as a supplementary feed for dairy cows.

The co-operative is recommending its suppliers feed a maximum of 3 kgs per cow per day.

Farm advisers spoken to by Radio New Zealand said some farmers were currently feeding out 6 to 9 kgs per cow per day, particularly during dry periods. . .

Delaval Backs NZ Dairy Awards:

Global dairy equipment market leader DeLaval has joined the family of national sponsors backing the 2016 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards.

Preparations for the 2016 awards programme are being finalised this week, as organisers and sponsors meet in Rotorua to confirm final details.

DeLaval representatives will take their place at the table, alongside representatives from Westpac, DairyNZ, Ecolab, Federated Farmers, Fonterra Farm Source, Honda Motorcycles, LIC, Meridian Energy, Ravensdown, and Primary ITO.

Chair Gavin Roden says the awards continue to attract strong support from the country’s leading dairy industry players. . . .

Reporoa feed company taking on the world:

After exporting its equine feed products into Asia for many years, Reporoa-based company Fiber Fresh has also now launched its calf feed products into the international marketplace.

Fiber Fresh is New Zealand’s largest animal nutrition export company, specialising in high nutritional equine and calf feed products. It celebrated 30 years in business earlier this year.

The company’s launch into the calf feed market in Japan also includes a research partnership with the school of veterinary medicine at Rakuno Gakuen University in Hokkaido.

Fiber Fresh founding director Michael Bell says launching into the Japanese calf market is a milestone for the company. . . 

Paula Nickel's photo.


Check your swtich board regularly

September 23, 2015

The power went out in our office.

We called an electrician who found this in the switchboard:

switch

The whole board was replaced when we altered two years ago.

The electrician found some of the what-nots (for which there is a technical term which escapes me as I type) needed tightening – some because they can come loose over time, some because they’d never been tightened properly in the first place.

Friends lost power recently and the cause was also found to be due to over-heating in the switch board.

The Fire Service reminds us all to check our smoke alarms when the clocks go forward and back (mutter, mumble, forward this weekend, which is at least three weeks too early). It would pay to check switch boards at the same time.


Quote of the day

September 23, 2015

Kerry McCarthy will have little in common with either the producers or consumers of food and would be better described as the Corbynist who would like DEFRA to be renamed the Department for Eradication of Farmers and Rural Areas. – Ukip’s agriculture spokesman Stuart Agnew on Jeremy Corbyn’s appointment of a vegan as shadow DEFRA Minister.


September 23 in history

September 23, 2015

480 BC  Euripides, Greek playwright, was born (d. 406 BC).

1122  Concordat of Worms.

1215 Kublai Khan of the Mongol Empire, was born (d. 1294).

1409  Battle of Kherlen, the second significant victory over Ming China by the Mongols since 1368.

1459 Battle of Blore Heath, the first major battle of the English Wars of the Roses.

1529  The Siege of Vienna began when Suleiman I attacked the city.

1641  The Merchant Royal, carrying a treasure worth over a billion USD, was lost at sea off Land’s End.

1779 American Revolution: a squadron commanded by John Paul Jones on board the USS Bonhomme Richard won the Battle of Flamborough Head, off the coast of England, against two British warships.

1803  Second Anglo-Maratha War: Battle of Assaye between the British East India Company and the Maratha Empire in India.

1821  Tripolitsa, Greece, fell and 30,000 Turks were massacred.

1846  Neptune was discovered by French astronomer Urbain Jean Joseph Le Verrier and British astronomer John Couch Adams;  then  verified by German astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle.

1857 The Russian warship Lefort capsised and sank during a storm in the Gulf of Finland, killing all 826 aboard.

1868 Grito de Lares (“Lares Revolt”) in Puerto Rico against Spanish rule.

1869  Mary Mallon, also known as Typhoid Mary, first carrier of typhoid, was born (d. 1938).

1880 John Boyd Orr, Scottish physician, Nobel Laureate, was born (d. 1971).

1887 Ngati Tuwharetoa gifted the mountain tops of Tongariro, Ngauruhoe and Ruapehu to the Crown.

Tongariro mountains gifted to Crown

1889  Nintendo Koppai (Later Nintendo Company, Limited) was founded by Fusajiro Yamauchi to produce and market the playing card game Hanafuda.

1905  Norway and Sweden signed the “Karlstad treaty”, peacefully dissolving the Union between the two countries.

1908  University of Alberta was founded.

1909  The Phantom of the Opera (original title: Le Fantôme de l’Opéra), a novel by French writer Gaston Leroux, was first published as a serialization in Le Gaulois.

1920 Mickey Rooney, American actor, was born.

1922 In Washington D. C., Charles Evans Hughes signed the Hughes-Peynado agreement, that ended the occupation of Dominican Republic by the United States.

1930 Ray Charles, American musician, was born (d. 2004).

1932  The Kingdom of Hejaz and Nejd was renamed the Kingdom ofSaudi Arabia.

1938 Mobilization of the Czechoslovak army in response to the Munich Crisis.

1939  Henry Blofeld, English cricket commentator, was born.

1941 World War II: The first gas chamber experiments were conducted at Auschwitz.

1942  World War II: First day of the September Matanikau action on Guadalcanal as United States Marine Corps forces attacked Imperial Japanese Army units along the Matanikau River.

1943 Julio Iglesias, Spanish singer, was born.

1943  World War II: The so-called Salò Republic, the Italian puppet state of Germany was born.

1944 Eric Bogle, British/Australian singer and songwriter, was born.

1949 Bruce Springsteen, American singer and songwriter, was born.

1952 Richard Nixon made his “Checkers speech“.

1954  Cherie Blair, lawyer and politician, wife of ex-British PM, was born.

1959   Iowa farmer Roswell Garst hosted Soviet premier Nikita Khrushchev.

1959  The MS Princess of Tasmania, Australia’s first passenger roll-on/roll-off diesel ferry, made her maiden voyage across Bass Strait.

1962  The Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts in New York City opened with the completion of the first building, the Philharmonic Hall (now Avery Fisher Hall) home of the New York Philharmonic.

1973  Juan Perón returned to power in Argentina.

1983  Gerrie Coetzee of South Africa became the first African boxing world heavyweight champion.

1983  Gulf Air Flight 771 was bombed, killing all 117 people on board.

1992 A large Provisional Irish Republican Army bomb destroyed the forensic laboratories in Belfast.

1999  NASA announced that it had lost contact with the Mars Climate Orbiter.

1999  Qantas Flight 1 overran the runway in Bangkok during a storm.

2002  The first public version of the web browser Mozilla Firefox(“Phoenix 0.1″) was released.

2004  Hurricane Jeanne: At least 1,070 in Haiti were reported killed by floods.

2008  Kauhajoki school shooting: Matti Saari killed 10 people before committing suicide.

Sourced from NZ History Online and Wikipedia


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