Good people

Yesterday I was in parliament’s public gallery for six valedictory speeches.

National MPs Shane Ardern, Phil Heatley, Paul Hutchison, Eric Roy and Tony Ryall, and Labour’s Ross Robertson delivered their reflections on their time in parliament.

All were very different but there was one similarity – all had come to parliament, motivated by their desire to serve their constituents and improve their country.

Politicians in general are often derided. Sometimes individuals deserve that derision.

But listening to all the speeches yesterday reminded me that most are good people and most do good work, some in smaller ways, others are able to achieve something bigger.

It also reminded me that there is a lot of common ground on ultimate goals. The divisions are often much less about where we’re going and far more about how to get there.

3 Responses to Good people

  1. Rob Hosking says:

    In NZ, there is a lot of very loud noise about very small differences. Which I suppose we should really be grateful for, when the alternative is considered.

    But it still gets a bit wearisome at times. [feeling a bit jaded right now…]

  2. Andrei says:

    In NZ, there is a lot of very loud noise about very small differences. Which I suppose we should really be grateful for, when the alternative is considered.

    But perhaps that reflects the lack of choice – I always get down ticks when I express my cynicism on the state of our democracy – which I don’t believe exists at all but is a phantom.

    I also think that true democracy is an unstable state and that when it does briefly flower it isn’t long before those who believe they are born to rule subvert it to their own ends, in these times leaving just the illusion to keep us quiet.

    I’m not a visceral John Key hater – don’t actually believe that there is anyone on offer that would be a viable alternative to him as prime minister but I also think that this sad situation is not entirely an accident.

    And of course John Key is a technocrat – the aristocrats of the 21st century West.

    We live in interesting times, nothing stays the same for ever and the world we have come to take for granted is about to change forever

    It may be John Key that will be in the hot seat when the crunch occurs and have to negotiate the major change that is coming down the pike.

  3. Mr E says:

    I think derision is often directed towards capability rather than motivation.

    I generally believe politicians have the right motivations within their own minds. It is the conclusions that have lead to the motivations that let down some individuals. Flawed conclusions is a capability issue.

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