#statsfacts

July 4, 2014


Silly sorry

July 4, 2014

If David Cunliffe wasn’t really sorry before he said he was sorry for being a man he will be now.

. . . “I don’t often say it, [but] I’m sorry for being a man because family and sexual violence is overwhelmingly perpetrated by men,” he said. . .

He doesn’t often say he’s sorry or he doesn’t often say he’s sorry for being a man?

Either way that sentence is getting far more publicity than the policy it prefaced and most of the publicity is negative.

Prime Minister  John Key said the apology was silly:

. . . John Key says that’s no reason to regret being a man.

“The problem isn’t being a man. The problem is if you’re an abusive man and I think it’s a bit insulting to imply that all men are abusive.

 “A small group are and they need to change their behaviour and be held to an account.”

Key says with his apology, Mr Cunliffe is implying that all men fall into that category.

“To get up and say, ‘I’m sorry for being a man’ really is, I think, a bit insulting to all men in New Zealand because the vast overwhelming bulk of them are good, loving fathers, brothers, uncles.” . . .

Exactly.

Violence, and family violence in particular, are problems but while men are the majority of perpetrators, the majority of men aren’t.

Cunliffe’s silly sorry is the sort of comment that starts people muttering about political correctness and feminazis.

It insults the majority of men who are good men.

It might even make those who aren’t good think that being a man is the problem which therefore excuses them because it’s something they can’t change.

One of the problems we face is too few positive male role models for many children who are brought up by women, taught by women and have very little to do with good, caring, strong men who never use their strength to intimidate, punish or harm.

Rather than apologising, good men should be standing tall, celebrating manliness and showing that violence and abuse aren’t manly.

Labour’s congress is an opportunity for the party to get free publicity.

They’ve sabotaged themselves by barring the media from most sessions and in the vacuum that’s created, the focus will go on this silly sorry for which Cunliffe should indeed by sorry.


Word of the day

July 4, 2014

Inchoate – just begun and not fully developed; rudimentary; being only partly in existence or operation;  incipient; imperfectly formed or formulated; not organised; lacking order; (of an offence, such as incitement or conspiracy) anticipating or preparatory to a further criminal act.


Polson, Bilodeau Agri-people of Year

July 4, 2014

Ballance Agri-Nutrients Chief Executive, Larry Bilodeau, was last night named 2014 Vodafone/Federated Farmers Agri Businessperson of the Year while the late Alistair Polson was named 2014 Agri Personality for 2014.

“With Te Radar as the perfect Master of Ceremonies, Federated Farmers was honoured to not only recognise all major agricultural award winners, but the two people who have emerged first among equals,” says Bruce Wills, Federated Farmers President whose term comes to an end at the conclusion of the Federation’s 2014 conference.

“It was bittersweet that we honoured the memory and outstanding contribution made by the late great Alistair Polson in making him 2014 Agri Personality of the Year.

“What made the night poignant was that his wife Bo accepted the Award on his behalf. Alistair was not only a great President of the Federation but defined selfless public service.

“Our 2014 Vodafone/Federated Farmers Agri Businessperson is Ballance Agri-Nutrients Chief Executive Larry Bilodeau.

“While the judging is done separate of us, I wish to pay tribute to the outstanding calibre New Zealand has in our rich agribusiness and agriservices environment. They were Dr. Paul Livingstone QSO of TB Free/OspriNZ, Lindy Nelson of the Agri Woman Development Trust and Farmlands Co-operative Society Ltd Chief Executive, Brent Esler.

“All are outstanding leaders.

“Larry, as Chief Executive of New Zealand’s largest fertiliser supplier, has led the co-operative’s evolution from one focused on fertiliser to one meeting the complete farm nutrient needs of our primary industries.

“We have truly outstanding talent in farming and these awards recognise and celebrate them. Something Te Radar noted as the primary industries need to recognise success more,” Mr Wills concluded.

Giving the award to Alistair Polson posthumously is a reminder of the importance of honouring and showing our appreciation of  people when they’re alive.

I hope it gives some comfort to his family to know how much his contribution to agriculture, his community and New Zealand, are valued.

Larry Bilodeau might not be well known outside farming circles but his leadership in Ballance has been outstanding.

 


Rural round-up

July 4, 2014

Red Meat Profit Partnership tries to answer crucial question – Allan Barber:

Analysis of the objectives and methodology of the RMPP suggests the programme has highlighted the most important issue facing the red meat sector. Briefly stated, it is to work out why there is still such a significant gap between the top farmers and those in the middle of the pack and to lift the average closer to the top performers.

When the Red Meat Sector Strategy identified behind the farm gate specifically as a major area of potential improvement, there was much mumbling about why the industry structure wasn’t being more usefully exposed as the area most in need of improvement. But figures released by the B+LNZ Economic Service show this isn’t the case. . .

 Out of cow muck comes magic – Emma Rawson:

Although it has grizzly beginnings in the blood and gore of the meatworks, there is a fairytale element to the story of biomaterials company Southern Lights.

A little like the Brothers Grimm’s goblin Rumpelstiltskin, who spun straw into gold, the Napier company transforms cow byproducts which would otherwise be destined for pet food and fertiliser into extremely lucrative Type 1 polymeric collagen.

At about $50,000 a kilogram it is no exaggeration to say the polymeric collagen is worth its weight in gold – only a few thousand shy of the price of bullion. . .

Award for science professor:

Lincoln University plant science professor Derrick Moot has won an award recognising the successful application of research or experience to an aspect of animal production.

Prof Moot was presented with the New Zealand Society of Animal Production’s Sir Arthur Ward Award at the society’s 74th annual conference on Tuesday night.

Prof Moot has been identifying plant pasture species which will survive and thrive on the dry East Coast, and developing ways to incorporate them into mostly sheep and beef farming systems – but also some dairying ones.

Lucerne ticked most of the boxes as it was a legume which fixed nitrogen from the atmosphere, was high in protein and energy and also had a deeper rooting system than other pastures, he said. . .

Filthy pigs? Not on our patch … – Sue O’Dowd:

The proud co-owner of a Taranaki piggery is so confident about its cleanliness that he sometimes walks around in it in his socks.

Ron Stanley, of Oaonui, is frustrated at this week’s television portrayal of a Canterbury piggery. Filmed earlier this year, the footage showed squalid conditions, severe overcrowding, and suffering animals.

The Stanley Piggery co-owner found the footage disturbing.

“That’s not the way we keep our animals,” he said. “I always say if I can’t come over to the piggery in my socks on a dry day, then there’s a problem. . .

Farm buildings to be exempt from assessment:

Farm buildings are to be exempt from the requirements for assessments under the Government’s earthquake-prone buildings policy, Building and Construction Minister Dr Nick Smith and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy announced today.

“The Government is not satisfied that the risks posed by farm buildings justify the cost of every building being assessed. These buildings have a low occupancy rate and there is no record of a fatality caused by a farm building collapsing in an earthquake,” Dr Smith says.

The Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill requires all buildings to be assessed in the next five years and for those under 34 per cent of the building standard to be upgraded within a period of 15 years, with a further 10-year extension available for heritage buildings. The Bill currently excludes residential buildings except those that are multi-storey and contain more than two homes. . .

Farmers welcome windfall from wind farms – Gerard Hutching:

Wind turbines west of Wellington are not only changing the landscape, they are also transforming landowners’ bank balances.

“They’re music to my ears, actually,” says Ohariu Valley sheep and beef farmer Gavin Bruce, who has a 440-hectare property with eight turbines.

All told there are 88 turbines on two Meridian Energy wind farms: 62 on the West Wind farm, situated on both Meridian’s own property as well as on Terawhiti Station, south of Makara; and 26 on the Mill Creek wind farm on four properties in the Ohariu Valley. . .

Driving safety home to farmers:

Rural retailers are backing government’s safety message to farmers.

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA), in partnership with Agcarm and WorkSafe New Zealand, is launching a campaign to increase awareness about the importance of wearing the right safety gear when using farm chemicals.

The campaign directly addresses the “she’ll be right” attitude toward using safety gear.

Agcarm distributor members across New Zealand will display posters and distribute flyers with practical tips about safety gear. . .

US Company churns out cloned cows

In the meadow, four white-haired Shorthorn heifers peel off from the others, raising their heads at the same time in the same direction. Unsettling, when you know they are clones.

From their ears dangle yellow tags marked with the same number: 434P. Only the numbers that follow are different: 2, 3, 4 and 6.

The tag also bears the name of the company that bred them and is holding them temporarily in a field at its headquarters in Sioux Centre, Iowa: Trans Ova Genetics, the only large US company selling cloned cows.

A few miles away, four Trans Ova scientists in white lab jackets bend over high-tech microscopes in the company’s laboratories. They are meticulously working with the minute elements of life to create, in Petri dishes, genetically identical copies of existing animals. . . .

You Won’t Believe What This Guy Did With Old Farm Scrap Metal. Seriously, WOW:

Farmers of South Dakota, if you see John Lopez going through your garbage, please let him continue to do so. In his hands, what was unfixable or unwanted to you becomes art. Not just any art, though. Big, striking sculptures that celebrate the American Old West. The kind of stuff you’d probably like! At the very least, you’ll be impressed by his work. Who wouldn’t be? . . .


Entries open for Enterprising Rural Women Awards

July 4, 2014

Entries are now open for the Enterprising Rural Women Awards 2014, offering women running small rural businesses the opportunity to boost their profiles and gain recognition for their achievements.

“This is the sixth year we’ve run the awards, and we’re already fielding inquiries from women keen to enter,” says Rural Women NZ national president, Wendy McGowan.

Last year’s supreme winner, Diane Coleman, of Treeline Native Nursery in Rotorua, says business is booming after the publicity that followed her win.

Though entering the awards may be outside some people’s comfort zone, Diane encourages rural businesswomen to pluck up the courage, as she did.

“Winning this award has been a once in a lifetime opportunity that was challenging, exciting, scary, fun, humbling and has really put my business on the map.”

There are four award categories in 2014:
Love of the Land – sponsored by Agrisea – for all land-based business, from animals to agriculture.

Help! I need somebody – sponsored by Access Homehealth – for businesses providing any type of service – from retailers to agricultural contractors.

Making it in Rural – sponsored by Telecom – for businesses that involve manufacturing or creativity.

Stay, Play Rural – sponsored by Xero – for businesses engaged in rural tourism or hospitality.

To enter the awards, women have to own and operate a small business with less than 10 full time equivalent staff, based in a rural area. The business must have been running for at least two years. If in partnership, women must be an active partner of 50 percent or more in the business.

Entries close Friday 5 September. Entry forms and further information are available on www.ruralwomen.org.nz/enterprisingruralwomen.The awards will be presented at the Rural Women NZ national conference in Rotorua on Saturday 15 November.

Each category winner will receive $1,000 in prize money and a trophy, with a further $1,000 going to the supreme winner.

These awards provide profile for enterprising rural businesses and celebrate the women who’ve make them a success.

Friday’s answers

July 4, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: We have the British motor industry as a role model for what happens when you try to save an industrial dinosaur. Britain was the first country to industrialise and the first to de-industrialise. We should learn from this.?

2. What were/are  Dinornis robustus and Dinornis novaezelandiae?

3. It’s éteint in French, estinto in Italian, too easy in Spanish and ngaro in Maori – what is it in English?

4. By what name is Raphus cucullatus, which lived on Mauritius, better known?

5. If you could bring back an extinct creature which would you choose?

Points for answers:

Andrei got 4 and a bonus for his answer to #5.

Rob got three, a good guess for #1 and a bonus for #5.

David wins an electronic banana cake with 5 right.

Freddy and Robert got one.

J Bloggs got 4.

Answers follow the break.

 

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