So close . . .

July 11, 2014

Scott Donaldson has had to abandon his attempt to be the first solo kayaker to cross the Tasman Sea.

Mr Donaldson was winched on board the Taranaki Rescue Helicopter around 2.15pm after requesting a rescue from the Maritime Rescue Co-Ordination Centre. . .

A freshly shaven Mr Donaldson told a press conference at the hospital later that he was feeling “pretty good physically” but a third attempt at the transtasman crossing was unlikely.

He said he was hurting after not completing his journey.

“I didn’t hit the finish line and that hurts me deeply and will hurt me for a long, long time,” he said.

“I didn’t want to go home.”

Mr Donaldson said he felt gutted when he saw the helicopter arrive to pluck him from his kayak, which was “wearing thin” following the “nastiest night” of the journey.

“34 miles short — that really gets me,” he said.

He said the decision to call off his mission was not made based on emotions.

“It wasn’t hard to make the call.”

He said if he had gone through the weather conditions forecast for tonight he would have risked losing communications, and that wasn’t a risk he was willing to take. . .

It must be frustrating to come so close and have to give up after all he’s been through, but the record wasn’t worth risking his life, or that of anyone who might have attempted to rescue him had he carried on and got into trouble.


Word of the day

July 11, 2014

Inspissate – thicken, condense or congeal; make or become dense.


Rural round-up

July 11, 2014

Farming leadership mould is slowly breaking – Charlie Mitchell:

Agriculture is the largest sector of New Zealand’s tradeable economy.

It generates 70 per cent of the country’s export earnings, and comprises 12 per cent of annual GDP. Although farming remains the backbone of this country’s economy, women have been far from prominent in its leadership roles. But it is possible to be a woman of influence among the farmers and growers, as two of the country’s prominent female leaders in the sector explain.

JANE HUNTER, HUNTER’S WINERY

Jane Hunter’s reputation precedes her. The managing director of Marlborough winery Hunter’s, she has been dubbed “the first lady of New Zealand wine”, received an OBE in 1993, and was made a Companion to the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2009. . .

“Weather” We Will – Just a Ranch Wife:

One thing about being in agriculture, you better like being the “beck and call girl” for Mother Nature.  SHE makes the rules.  SHE decides if you are going to get any sleep in the spring during calving, or “weather” she is in the mood to dump LOADS of snow on you and make every single thing exponentially more difficult.  SHE decides if you are going to brand on the day you have your crew lined up, or “weather” she needs to blow off some steam and try to blow your crew away or give them a good soaking. SHE decides if you are going to get your fields planted, or “weather” your tractor is going to be stuck up to the axle when you tried too soon.  SHE decides if you are going to get your hay cut and baled, or “weather” she wants to blow it around or wet it down some.  . .

Alex takes his stock skills to world stage  – Sahiban Kanwal:

Waimate’s Alex Reekers has trimmed and shorn his way to the finals of the World Young Shepherds Challenge.

Reekers will represent New Zealand at the finals in Auvergne, France, in September and he is keen to learn about his foreign counterparts and their farming systems.

“The hardest thing to do will be study, and try to study the right things. Not being on home turf and competing in a country with different farming systems and regulations could throw some curveballs,” he said.

He said preparation for the preliminary rounds, which had got him this far, was quite difficult as the guidelines for the competition were pretty general. . .

Optimism for woollen mill – Alan Williams:

Wool Equities (WEL) says it is close to getting a funding package for its Bruce Woollen Mill business in South Otago.

A statement on a reconfiguration of the business is expected in the next week or so, WEL chairman Cliff Heath said.

He confirmed significant cashflow problems for Bruce Woollen Mill over the past six months, and attempts over that time to revamp it onto a more fundable footing.

“We are close to achieving that.”

Bruce Woollen Mill had developed a solid customer base over the past two years, since WEL became majority owner, and had a good order book for about five months ahead. . .

Vineyard seeks consent to subdivide – Lynda Van Kempen:

Terra Sancta vineyard owners Mark Weldon and Sarah Elliot are seeking a subdivision of a Cornish Point property to further expand their viticulture business.

The couple, under the name of the Tane and Miro Trust, have applied to the Central Otago District Council for planning consent to create two allotments in Cornish Point Rd, near Cromwell, with areas of 4847sq m and 6.26ha.

They bought the former Olssens vineyard, one of the pioneering vineyards in the Bannockburn area, in 2011 and rebranded it as Terra Sancta. . .

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Genetics underway:

Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) Genetics is officially in business.

B+LNZ Genetics General Manager, Graham Alder said the contract with the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment has been signed, securing the Government’s contribution of $15 million over the next five years.

In total the new entity will attract $44 million, coming from sheep and beef farmers, the wider red meat industry and the Government.

“This investment will power up the genetic gains for New Zealand sheep and cattle so they are more profitable and better matched to consumer demands.” . . .

International judges announced for 2014 Air New Zealand Wine Awards:

Two highly respected international wine personalities will be joining this year’s judging panel for the country’s premier wine competition, the Air New Zealand Wine Awards.

Respected wine writer David Brookes from Australian Gourmet Traveller WINE, Wine Companion and Wine & Spirits magazines, and Sebastian Braun, one of Sweden’s leading wine buyers, will be joining the judging team of 26 for this year’s competition.

Judging for the 2014 Air New Zealand Wine Awards will take place from 3 to 5 November, in Auckland. The gold medal winning wines will be announced on 12 November. On Saturday, 22 November, the ‘best of the best’ trophy winning wines will be revealed at a black tie dinner in Hawke’s Bay. The dinner will be attended by New Zealand’s top winemakers and industry figures to celebrate the quality of New Zealand wine. . .


Friday’s answers

July 11, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: Laughter is the sun that drives winter from the human face.?

2. To whom does this refer: Now is the winter of our discontent. Made glorious summer by this son of York.?

3. It’s gel in French, gelo in Italian, helada in Spanish and haupapa in Maori, what is it in English?

4. Who wrote The Snow Goose and what historical event does it depict?

5. What’s your favourite hot soup for cold days?

Points for answers:

Andrei and David win an electronic chocolate self-saucing pudding for a clean sweep.

Gravedodger wins the same for a clean sweep, reminding me of a similar reaction to the book and a bonus for the recipe.

Rob got four and a bonus for linking to the film which I remember watching one Easter and loved.

J Bloggs got four and a bonus for the recipe.

PDM gets a smile – and Mrs PDM gets my sympathy – I’m not keen on barley either.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Manufacturing expands for 21 months

July 11, 2014

Once more the statistics don’t support the opposition’s manufactured manufacturing crisis:

The manufacturing sector remains in expansion mode, despite some aspects of the results that need to be watched closely in the months ahead, according to the latest BNZ – BusinessNZ Performance of Manufacturing Index (PMI).

The seasonally adjusted PMI for June was 53.3 (a PMI reading above 50.0 indicates that manufacturing is generally expanding; below 50.0 that it is declining). This was 0.7 points higher than May, with the sector now being in expansion for 21 consecutive months.

BusinessNZ’s executive director for manufacturing Catherine Beard said that the slight lift in expansion levels was obviously welcome, albeit with a few head winds for manufacturers.

“Overall production levels remain healthy, and have been very consistent for the last three months. Employment levels continue to show more people entering the sector, while the largest proportion of comments received are still positive.

“As mentioned last month, the fundamentals of both the PMI and other indicators of the economy still point to positive activity. However, the continued strength of the New Zealand dollar, as well as new order levels continuing to fall, mean there are elements of the sector that need to be watched closely in the months ahead.

BNZ senior economist, Craig Ebert says “Wading through the manufacturing component of the latest QSBO, while there are clear hints of moderation, it seems mainly a settling down into normal growth patterns rather than any sort of stalling. We get a similar impression for the recent PMI levels and trends, with its weak spot seemingly concentrated in new orders.” . . .

Business is never easy but 21 successive months of expansion with the dollar providing a head wind is a sign of the sector’s strength.

 


Silly or weak

July 11, 2014

One of the challenges for the leader of the opposition is to look like a Prime Minister in waiting.

It’s one which David Cunliffe has yet to master, and his silly apology for being a man was another example of that.

 Trans-Tasman points out:

. . . The Labour Party election year congress dominated the first part of the week, with Cunliffe’s rather strange apology for having both an X and a Y chromosome. It was all very well for Labour’s apologists to splutter – as they did – about the apology being taken out of context. The only context which matters is Cunliffe wants to be PM of this country, and is campaigning ferociously to get the job.

In this context, the apology made him look either silly or weak. People don’t, by and large, go for leaders who look silly or weak. And, looking back, the thought of, say, Norman Kirk, Peter Fraser or Michael Savage apologising for being a man boggles the mind a bit. . .

Labour was once the party of the working man – and woman.

It’s strayed a long way from those roots.

That’s reflected in its loss of support in successive polls – and it’s showing up in other places too:

Hat tip for tweet: Keeping Stock

As for the issue which has been lost in the slipstream of the stupid apology, Peter Dunne writes:

. . . Meanwhile, the scourge of domestic violence continues across all communities, sadly without discrimination, right across the country. Let there be no doubt about the severity and complete unacceptability of any violence against women and children in our society. That has to stop – now – and, as the major perpetrators of that violence, men have to face up to their responsibilities in addressing it. Bold action, across the board, is required right now – not simpering, gesturing apologies for a biological fact that cannot be easily altered.

We need to take the wraps off domestic violence and expose its prevalence wherever we can. Police revelations there are around 200 reported cases every day of the year are part of that. Our aim has to be to make any tolerance of domestic violence as unacceptable as drink-driving and smoking have been made in earlier times, so that underlying social attitudes are changed. . . .

 The last thing we need is the absolute trivialising of a serious social problem by fake and insincere apologies, designed more for a headline, than to do any meaningful good. The women and children of New Zealand who live in constant fear and suffering because of domestic violence deserve a far better response than that.

And I make no apology for saying so. . .

Dunne has no need to apologise for taking a serious issue seriously.


What do others at school think?

July 11, 2014

A Hastings school which lost a High Court battle over suspending a student for refusing to cut his hair has been ordered to pay more than $24,000 in costs.

Last month Justice David Collins ruled in favour of 16-year-old St John’s College student Lucan Battison, who successfully fought to keep his locks after being suspended.. .

The Battisons’ lawyer, Jol Bates, said costs of $24,159 had been awarded, which were a contribution towards the family’s legal expenses – about two-thirds of actual costs. . . .

I wonder what the other pupils, their parents, the school board and staff think of that?


Working for NZ

July 11, 2014

National’s working for New Zealand.

Its policies are too which is reflected in more people in work and fewer dependent on welfare.

National is making good progress helping Kiwis off a benefit and into work. #Working4NZ http://ntnl.org.nz/1thz148

These are big numbers behind which are individual people whose lives are better thanks to policies which encourage growth and help people to help themselves.

These financial and social benefits are the reason why a focus on responsible management of the economy is one of National’s priorities.

The benefits of a growing economy are more than just good GDP figures. #Working4NZ http://ntnl.org.nz/1vYKBgt

The economy matters because sustainable social and environmental initiatives depend on its health.


July 11 in history

July 11, 2014

472  After being besieged in Rome by his own generals, Western Roman Emperor Anthemius was captured in the Old St. Peter’s Basilica and put to death.

911 Signing of the Treaty of Saint-Clair-sur-Epte between Charles the Simple and Rollo of Normandy.

1274 Robert the Bruce, King of Scotland, was born (d. 1329).

1302 Battle of the Golden Spurs (Guldensporenslag in Dutch) – a coalition around the Flemish cities defeats the king of France’s royal army.

1346  Charles IV of Luxembourg was elected emperor of the Holy Roman Empire.

1405  Ming admiral Zheng He set sail to explore the world for the first time.

1476 Giuliano della Rovere was appointed bishop of Coutances.

1576 Martin Frobisher sighted Greenland.

1616 Samuel de Champlain returned to Quebec.

1735 Mathematical calculations suggested that on this day that dwarf planet Pluto moved inside the orbit of Neptune for the last time before 1979.

1740   Jews were expelled from Little Russia.

1750  Halifax, Nova Scotia was almost completely destroyed by fire.

1767 John Quincy Adams, President of the United States, was born (d. 1848).

1776 Captain James Cook began his third voyage.

1789 Jacques Necker was dismissed as France’s Finance Minister sparking the Storming of the Bastille.

1796  The United States took possession of Detroit from Great Britain under terms of the Jay Treaty.

1798  The United States Marine Corps was re-established.

1801  French astronomer Jean-Louis Pons made his first comet discovery.

1804 Vice President of the United States Aaron Burr mortally wounded former Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton in a duel.

1833  Noongar Australian aboriginal warrior Yagan, wanted for leading attacks on white colonists in Western Australia, was killed.

1848 Waterloo railway station in London opened.

1859 A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens  was published.

1864 American Civil War: Battle of Fort Stevens; Confederate forces attempted to invade Washington, D.C..

1877 Kate Edgar became the first woman in New Zealand to gain a university degree and the first woman in the British Empire to earn a BA.

Kate Edger becomes NZ’s first woman graduate

1882  The British Mediterranean fleet began the Bombardment of Alexandria in Egypt as part of the 1882 Anglo-Egyptian War.

1888 Carl Schmitt, German philosopher and political theorist, was born  (d. 1985).

1889 Tijuana, Mexico, was founded.

1893  The first cultured pearl was obtained by Kokichi Mikimoto.

1893  A revolution led by the liberal general and politician, José Santos Zelaya, takes over state power in Nicaragua.

1895 The Lumière brothers demonstrated film technology to scientists.

1897  Salomon August Andrée left Spitsbergen to attempt to reach the North pole by balloon.

1899  E. B. White, American writer, was born  (d. 1985).

1906 The Gillette-Brown murder inspired Theodore Dreiser’s An American Tragedy.

1914  Babe Ruth made his debut in Major league baseball.

1916 – Reg Varney, English actor, was born (d. 2008).

1916 – Gough Whitlam, 21st Prime Minister of Australia, was born.

1919  The eight-hour working day and free Sunday became law in the Netherlands.

1920 Yul Brynner, Russian-born actor, was born (d. 1985).

1920 In the East Prussian plebiscite the local populace decided to remain with Weimar Germany

1921 A truce was called in the Irish War of Independence.

1921 – Former U.S. President William Howard Taft was sworn in as 10th Chief Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, becoming the only person to ever be both President and Chief Justice.

1921 – The Red Army captured Mongolia from the White Army and establishes the Mongolian People’s Republic.

1922 The Hollywood Bowl opened.

1929 David Kelly, Irish actor, was born.

1929 The Gillingham Fair fire disaster killed 15 in England.

1932 Bob McGrath, American actor, was born.

1936 The Triborough Bridge in New York City was opened to traffic.

1940 World War II: Vichy France regime was formally established. Henri Philippe Pétain became Prime Minister of France.

1943  Massacres of Poles in Volhynia.

1943 – World War II: Allied invasion of Sicily – German and Italian troops launched a counter-attack on Allied forces in Sicily.

1947 The Exodus 1947 headed to Palestine from France.

1950 Bonnie Pointer, American singer (Pointer Sisters), was born.

1955  The phrase In God We Trust was added to all U.S. currency.

1957 Prince Karim Husseini Aga Khan IV inherited the office of Imamat as the 49th Imam of Shia Imami Ismaili worldwide, after the death of Sir Sultan Mahommed Shah Aga Khan III.

1959 Richie Sambora, American musician (Bon Jovi), was born.

1960 Independence of Benin, Burkina Faso and Niger.

1960  To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee was first published.

1962 Pauline McLynn, Irish actress, was born.

1962  First transatlantic satellite television transmission.

1971  Copper mines in Chile were nationalised.

1973 A Brazilian Boeing 707 crashed near Paris on approach to Orly Airport, killing 123 of the 134 on-board.

1977 Martin Luther King Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

1978 Los Alfaques Disaster: A truck carrying liquid gas crashed and exploded at a coastal campsite in Tarragona, Spain killing 216 tourists.

1979  America’s first space station, Skylab, was destroyed as it re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere over the Indian Ocean.

1983 A Boeing 727 crashed into hilly terrain after a tail strike in Cuenca, Ecuador, claiming 119 lives.

1987  According to the United Nations, the world population crossed the 5,000,000,000 mark.

1990 Oka Crisis: First Nations land dispute in Quebec began.

1991  A Nationair DC-8 crashed during an emergency landing at Jeddah, killing 261.

1995  A Cubana de Aviacion Antonov An-24 crashds into the Caribbean off southeast Cuba killing 44 people.

1995   Over 8000 Bosnian men and children (mostly Bosniaks) were killed by Serbian troops commanded by Ratko Mladic.

2006 –  209 people were killed in a series of bomb attacks in Mumbi.

2012 – Astronomers announced the discovery of Styx, the fifth moon of Pluto.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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