Right on top of blog rankings

01/07/2014

Open Parachute’s monthly blog rankings show the right on top:

Visit Rank Blog Visits/month Page Views/month
1 Whale oil beef hooked 1758095 2957997
2 Kiwiblog 445721 771086
3 The Daily Blog 218234 345266
4 The Standard 201495 443470
5 Auckland Transport Blog 155853 160244
6 Throng New Zealand 53729 94004
7 The Dim-Post 53509 75134
8 Sciblogs 39662 50631
9 Liturgy 36160 50478
10 Keeping Stock 33807 53244
11 No Right Turn 26757 35029
12 Homepaddock 26471 36951
13 NewZeal 21726 35094
14 No Minister 20898 27292
15 Music of sound 14879 18833
16 Imperator Fish 13552 17547
17 13th Floor 12544 17630
18 Save our schools NZ 12355 14307
19 Keith Johnson Wellington NZ 12120 12574
20 Offsetting Behaviour 11835 16377

 

The combined total of the top left-wing blogs, which are at third and fourth, is still less than Kiwiblog which is second and miles from Whale Oil in first place.

Dim Post from the left is seventh and Keeping Stock from the right is 10th. I’m at 12, No Minister, which is more right than not is at 14th and Imperator Fish which is left is 16th.

I ditched Sitemeter because I kept getting a window asking me to sign in to it and now rely on StatCounter to record visits:

stats6.14

 

 


Hello again Pork Pie

01/07/2014

The 1981 movie Goodbye Pork Pie  made a comeback today with MINI New Zealand releasing its remake of the films iconic Lake Hawea chase scene.

The scene, which features a number of ‘new originals’ including a new Director, new cast and the all new MINI Hatch in place of the original 1978 model, has been created to celebrate the launch of the new model released to the New Zealand market in April.

MINI Marketing Manager Simonne Mearns says the remade scene is the perfect ‘launch vehicle’ for the new MINI Hatch.

“The latest MINI is full of a number of new features – enough to warrant us making a big scene about it. Which is exactly what we did.”

“Goodbye Pork Pie was the perfect fit for MINI. There is definitely a little ‘Blondini’ inherent in the brand; we like to test the boundaries and push the limits, and a cheeky attitude is part of MINI’s ethos.”

“In addition, like the Blondini Gang, we are always up for the challenge – which in this case was remaking one of the tougher, but more iconic scenes from what is one of New Zealand’s most-loved movies. We are stoked with the result and hope Kiwis will enjoy it,” she says.

This is a feeling that shared by remake director Matt Murphy who thinks “that most New Zealanders will be intrigued by the remade scene. The image of the new volcanic orange MINI being chased by a replica police car somehow translates to the original movie really easily. At the same time, it is also new.”

In responding to what he believes his father might think of the remade scene, Murphy says, “My father knows of the project. You’ll have to ask him what he thinks, but I’d say he’s chuffed that the Pork Pie story still generates a significant following.” . .  .

You can watch the remake and a behind the scenes video here.

You can watch it on YouTube and here’s the original trailer:

My first car was a mini so Goodbye Pork Pie had particular resonance for me.

I can remember the determination to take the car to Invercargill – but does anyone remember why they wanted to go there?


Word of the day

01/07/2014

Impedimenta –appurtenances; equipment for an activity or expedition, especially when considered as bulky or an encumbrance; baggage or other things that retard one’s progress.


Rural round-up

01/07/2014

A specialist land-based institution is essential for New Zealand :

Lincoln is New Zealand’s specialist land-based university. Its research and qualifications cover agriculture, yet also life sciences, conservation and ecology, environmental management, tourism, agribusiness, property management, and landscape architecture. This is a tried and true, and successful, model internationally.

Lincoln suffered in the aftermath of the Canterbury earthquakes.  It is now recovering. Unlike most other New Zealand universities, international student numbers at Lincoln are growing strongly, and domestic student numbers have been maintained over the last few years. This is most likely a reflection of the extremely high employment rate of Lincoln’s graduates, and the increasing demand for them as reflected in a recent Ministry of Primary Industries’ report.

The one or two recent opinion pieces regarding the university’s reorganisation are unfortunate, but perhaps not surprising. The University is strengthening its focus on its core purposes – to help Feed the world, Protect the future and help people Live well – and this has necessitated changes in the organisational structure and staffing of the institution, as well as its portfolio of qualifications. . . .

Landcorp considers business case for milking sheep – Pam Graham:

(BusinessDesk) – Landcorp, New Zealand’s largest corporate farmer, is having a serious look at milking sheep and will decide in a few months whether there is a business case for it.

Chief executive Steven Carden, who is about one year in the job, says the board gave him a broad mandate to look expansively at opportunities and milking sheep is one he has come up with.

Landcorp has a flock of about 850,000 ewes, none of which it milks, but it leases about 1,500 to Invercargill-based Blue River Dairy, an existing processor of sheep milk.

“Landcorp has been a very successful sheep farmer for many years,” Carden said. At present the state-owned company produces wool and meat but sees an opportunity in the sheep milk industry where there is no real international player. Sheep milk consumer products are established in many countries but they are largely produced domestically. . .

FE research to save farmers millions

A partnership of CRV Ambreed and AgResearch is helping reduce the impact of facial eczema (FE) in dairy cattle by developing genetics that make cows more tolerant to the disease which costs the dairy industry $160 million a year.

The artificial breeding company and AgResearch were working together under the auspices of the Primary Growth Partnership (PGP).

CRV Ambreed genetic development strategist Phil Beatson said dairy farmers knew facial eczema was a cruel disease that could be incredibly stressful for cattle and an economic risk to their businesses through lowered milk production, weight loss, and stock deaths. . .

Cotton onBernard Lilburn:

Brothers Jono and Jack Lilburn from Manawatu were in a gang of six Kiwi blokes taking on the cotton harvest at Cubbie Station last summer. The numbers are huge, just like the machinery. Bernard Lilburn visited his sons to check out their day job.

The numbers around growing cotton in Australia are truly mind boggling. Contractor Steve O’Brien, based in Gunnedah in northern New South Wales, is a true blue Aussie and one that has some serious commitment to the cotton industry in his region. 

His “region” covers an area about the size of the North Island of New Zealand and he has four 7760 John Deere cotton pickers or round module balers (RMBs) with a replacement value of US$880,000 each! He usually replaces two every year. He also needs at least two 300 horse power tractors to pick up the bales as they come out of the pickers. . .

New pasture tool in the pipeline:

A NOVEL pasture meter jointly developed by English and Irish entrepreneurs was unveiled on the Enterprise Ireland stand at Fieldays.

The Grassometer uses four optical sensors to gauge pasture covers as the operator walks the farm. Its developers believe it is more accurate and convenient than the Platemeter or C-Dax now sold.

“The data is instantly transferred to your computer or smartphone as you walk the paddock and there’s no converting centimetres of pasture into kilogrammes of drymatter: it’s all done for you,” Sam Hoste, commercial manager of Monford Ag Systems, told Rural News. . . .

The Caveman Couch Potato: Lincoln researchers analyse the evolution of sedentary behaviour:

They are credited for the latest diet fads and lauded as exemplars of physical fitness, but were the cavemen and women of our distant past really the best examples of a healthy lifestyle?

The modern epidemic of obesity and disease is often blamed on the rise of a sedentary society, in which we alternate between sitting at the office and on the couch, with only a car ride in between. However, in a paper on ‘Sedentary behaviour and chronic disease’ published in Perspectives in Public Health, two Lincoln University researchers, Associate Professor  Mike Hamlin and Senior Lecturer Adrian Paterson have highlighted that modern society isn’t necessarily more sedentary than that of early hunter-gatherers. They also argue that sedentary behaviour has an important role in society that was as useful to our ancestors as it is today. . .


Playing with ears and words

01/07/2014

Conversation with Simon Mercep on Critical Mass today was sparked by:

* An audio illusion

and

* Word games to determine which breed of English you speak

 


Moa madness

01/07/2014

Trevor Mallard election winning strategy is to bring back the moa.

Does this mean he:

a) Is acting in his capacity as a member of the ABC – Anyone But Cunliffe – club.

b) Is trying to distract us from something good National is doing.

c) Is trying to distract us from something bad that Labour is doing.

d) Is aiming for a back to the future version of Mike Moore’s lamb burgers with moa burgers.

e) Is trying to differentiate Labour from the Green Party in its opposition to genetic modification.

f) Has lost the plot.

g) All of the above.

 

 


More sheep shot

01/07/2014

A week after nearly 200 sheep were shot on a North Otago farm at least 15 more have been shot on another farm in the area on Sunday night or early yesterday morning.

. . . They [police] are not yet saying whether they were shot dead or whether they think the deaths are linked.

“Both of these events are very unusual but we appreciate that they will be creating a high level of concern amongst local farmers and the community in the Ngapara area,” says Detective Warren Duncan.

Witnesses who may have seen anything in the Crown Hill, Conlans Road and Peaks Road area were asked to contact police.

Last weekend, 195 sheep were shot at Peter Stackhouse’s property over two nights. Many had to be put down because the bullets did not kill them.

Police were baffled as to why so many were shot but not taken for their meat.

However, Det Duncan said “good information” had come in on the killings. . .

The area has been plagued by unsolved crimes going back several decades:

Whether you believe in lunar madness or not, there is evidence to suggest the full moon has cast its spell over Ngapara in the past 40 years.

As inquiries continue into the slaughter of about 195 sheep on a Ngapara farm last weekend, so too do investigations into a 40-year trail of unsolved crimes in the area – most of them committed during a full moon, according to Oamaru police.

”[Farmers] all know that on a full moon [the offender(s)] plays up – full moon, watch out, keep everything locked up,” Community Constable Bruce Dow, of Oamaru, said.

”They say: ‘Full moon, [they’ll] be out there tonight’.”

A sense of fear remained in the community and farmers had always been aware of suspicious activity, he said.

”This has been a bone of contention for that community for years and years and it’s not stopped,” he said.

”It’s criminal behaviour by an individual or individuals and it’s causing the community of Enfield, Ngapara and Georgetown a lot of concern.

”It hasn’t been forgotten – if the offender out there thinks that he or she has got away with this, they are fooling themselves.”

Police can trace a series of fires and sabotage of vehicles and farm equipment back to 1975 in the Ngapara area, extended in some cases to Enfield and Georgetown.

Const Dow said the unsolved crimes were unlikely to be linked to the shootings of ewes and hoggets on the Stackhouse family farm last Friday and Saturday nights, but police were still appealing for information. . .

Historic crimes in the Ngapara area included theft of property from tractors, stock theft, arson of hay sheds, paddocks, forests and houses and serious damage to tractors, and machinery.

”Engines have been destroyed on tractors, headers and vehicles, we believe by the use of carborundum, a grinding paste,” Const Dow said.

”Tyres have been punctured, wheel nuts have been loosened off tractors and cars. Sheep have been stolen and ear tags from one farm have been found down offal pits of another.”

Fences had been cut, electric fences tampered with and one farmer lost more than 2250 litres of diesel when the taps from a fuel tank were turned on.

The Stackhouse family farm was also targeted about 20 years ago, with farm machinery seriously damaged, Const Dow said.

In many cases, damage had been subtle, such as holes drilled in hydraulic hoses and nail holes poked into a tractor’s air filter.

”Everything has been covertly done – they’ve been done under cover of darkness and a lot of them were done so they wouldn’t be discovered until when the equipment was needed the most,” he said.

”Old-timers … will remember lots of these incidents and they will have a very firm opinion of who’s caused it.” . . .

Not only old-timers have a firm opinion of the identity of the perpetrator of the on-going crimes but there has never been enough proof to lay charges.

However, these mass shooting are something new and very unwelcome.

While killing other people’s stock for meat can’t be condoned it can be understood.

But this senseless shooting, killing and leaving some animals still alive but badly injured, is evil and has left everyone in the area very worried.

The crimes have also galvanised community spirit. An email arrived from Federated Farmers advising:

Community fundraiser in support of the Stackhouse Family – Waiareka Sale, Monday 7 July

Federated Farmers and the North Otago community are holding a special fundraising sale to assist Peter and Janine Stackhouse  following the recent brutal attack on their stock, where approximately 200 sheep were shot.

When:Monday 7 July 2014

Where: Waiareka Sale Yards (after their usual morning sale)

If people would like to donate ewes or lambs it would be greatly appreciated, if so, we’d ask for ewes or lambs to be delivered to the Waiareka sale yards, on the morning of the sale (Monday, 7 July).

If you’d like to donate stock but are unable to deliver them to the sale yards, please contact Greg Ruddenklau on (03) 432 4006 or 027 429 6179 to organise a pick up.

If instead you’d like to give a cash donation to the Stackhouse’s, a fundraiser account has been set up by Rural Woman NZ and the details are below.

Federated Farmers would like to publicly thank PGG Wrightson, Rural Women NZ North Otago and CRT Farmlands for their assistance.

Fundraiser details:

Deliver ewes or lambs on the morning of the sale, or if this is not possible, please contact Greg Ruddenklau on (03) 432 4006 or 027 429 6179 to organise a pick up.

Fundraising account for cash donations:

Westpac: 03 0937 0071238 00

Account: Rural Women NZ North Otago

Reference number: “Farm Stock”

For more information please contact

Lyndon Strang
Vice-President Federated Farmers North Otago


Why not make it permanent?

01/07/2014

Import tariffs on a range of building products will be temporarily suspended from today – a measure which is expected to reduce housing costs and increase competition in the residential construction sector, Housing Minister Dr Nick Smith and Commerce Minister Craig Foss.

“The building materials covered by the tariff suspension comprise about 90 per cent of the cost of the material in an average new house. Currently, these materials attract tariffs and duties that add an estimated $3500 to the cost of a new home. These will be cut to zero per cent tomorrow for at least the next five years,” Dr Nick Smith says.

“The scheme includes a comprehensive list of materials such as roofing, cladding, framing, windows, doors, insulation, plumbing and electrical components, fixed cabinetry, paint and builders’ hardware and fixings,” Dr Smith says.

“New Zealand is a small market for building materials. While we would prefer as much content as possible is locally manufactured, we need the competitive pressure of imported products to ensure we are getting best value for money,” Mr Foss says.

“It is through competition and choice for consumers that we keep costs down.”

The tariff suspension comes off the back of the Budget 2014 initiative to temporarily remove anti-dumping duties for building materials, for which legislation was passed under Budget urgency in May. The temporary suspension of tariffs on building materials will reduce Crown revenue by $5.5 million each year, which was provided for in Budget 2014.

“Suspending import tariffs on building materials is consistent with this Government’s strong public commitment to address housing affordability, particularly given the need for building materials for the Canterbury rebuild and increased construction activity across the country,” Dr Smith says.

“There is no single magical solution to improving housing affordability. We are freeing up land supply, reining in development contributions, cutting compliance costs and investing in skills and productivity in the construction sector. It is about making a whole lot of changes like removing tariffs and duties that aggregate together to make homes more affordable.”

I have just one problem with this – that the removal of tariffs is temporary.

When we spend a lot of time and energy extolling the benefits of free trade to other countries we have to be open to imports ourselves.

Tariffs protect inefficient producers and add costs to everyone who builds something new or repairs something old.

Why not make the suspension of tariffs permanent?


Sins of omission and commission

01/07/2014

Nick Leggett writes of Labour’s sins of omission:

. . . The biggest crime a Labour Party caucus, activist base and affiliated unions can commit is to not put their party in a position where it can realistically when an election. They can claim all they like to want to bring new talent into parliament through the list, but on current polling, it’s rhetoric – no new faces will make it come September. . .

It seems the underlying premise of recent comments by some “outsider” activists and politicians like myself are correct: Labour isn’t
 aiming for 40% plus of the vote because they neither want – nor know how – to go about winning it. Those in charge of the party know the only way to keep the agenda and the caucus small is by keeping the vote low and encouraging the Greens and Mana-Internet to grow their support in the next Parliament. “Hopefully,” they say, “we can stitch together a rag-tag coalition of the weird and the wonderful.”

As a life-long (moderate and pro-enterprise) Labour supporter, I would rather the party win significantly more people like me and get the vote to say 38%, than appear as they do, which seems to be a preference for Hone, Laila and the Greens to be elected to the next Parliament instead of good candidates further down the Labour list. . . .

If this is the strategy it’s a very dangerous one.

People in the middle who might swing towards national or labour don’t want a lurch to the hard left.

. . . A talented Wellingtonian, with proven electoral appeal told me that last year he offered himself up as a prospective Labour candidate for Ohariu. He was advised however by the senior party person he asked not to bother because he wasn’t a woman. If I revealed who he is, I’m sure most people would agree that had he been selected, Peter Dunne would now be looking down the barrel of voter-enforced retirement. . .

The female quota is a sin of commission rather than omission and this example illustrates its dangers.

. . .  The party appear not to care about re-establishing bases in and amongst communities in provincial and suburban New Zealand by selecting candidates who god forbid might actually win some votes. . .

For all the rhetoric about the regions, Labour MPs just pop in to hunt a headline and leave again with locals feeling we just don’t matter to them.

Meanwhile there are list MPs approaching their third and fourth election this year in seats that should be winnable but somehow they have never managed to win. Some of these MPs have again been rewarded with high list placings, so where is the incentive for them to win those electorates? The bigger question is, why doesn’t the party appear to care?

It seems Labour has given up on gaining votes from aspirational workers who want to own their own home, those who strive to run a small business and the people pottered throughout every class, culture and community in New Zealand who care deeply about reforming the systems and policies that continually fail our children. . .

These are the people in the middle of the political spectrum and they are much likely to feel at home with John Key and National than they are with the muddled messages coming from Labour.


A wee bit too clever?

01/07/2014

Politics is hard on families and I respect Holly Walker’s decision to put her family first by deciding to resign.

Her decision to remain as the candidate for Hutt South is somewhat less laudable.

Since Jeanette Fitzsimons lost Coromandel, the Green party hasn’t even pretended to be interested in winning electorates.

I’ve heard their candidates tell meetings to not vote for them, vote for the Labour man or woman, they’re only interested in the party vote.

Like it or not, that’s what MMP allows.

But to have an MP who has stated she will resign from parliament at the end of the term still stand as a candidate in a seat is a new twist of the system.

It’s not unusual to have people stand in seats they can’t win.

Plenty stand in seats for the sake of the party knowing they won’t win nor can they expect to get in on the list. They are taking one for the team in the hope of increasing the party vote.

But this is the first time a list MP who has announced she won’t be in the next parliament still plans to campaign in a seat with the deliberate intent of neither winning it nor returning to parliament.

There are obvious advantages for the party – they have a candidate with profile and the ability to get publicity in a way open to MPs but not so much to a candidate, and who is being paid by the taxpayer.

But what’s in it for the people of Hutt South?

Nothing but another example of MMP’s faults.

The Green Party engineered the early entry of Russel Norman into parliament when he first became co-leader so he could campaign as an MP with the benefits and pay that carried.

That was manipulating the system but at least he was fully intending to be an MP after the next election.

This smells worse than that.

Walker would be paid until the end of the parliamentary term without being a candidate and even if she wasn’t standing in a seat she could still campaign for the party until the election.

So it’s not that there’s any extra cost involved.

It’s more an extra dose of duplicity.

Not trying to win because it’s the party vote that counts is one thing, standing without wanting to win is another.

In the normal course of events a candidate who didn’t expect tow in would be delighted is s/he did but obviously Walker wouldn’t be.

The chances might be slim, and if the good folk of Hutt South catch on to what’s going on, they’ll be even slimmer.

And that’s where she and the party might be being a wee bit too clever.

They might not like the smell of this and decide to give their party votes to a party which stands candidates who genuinely want to be in parliament.


July 01 in history

01/07/2014

69  Tiberius Julius Alexander ordered his Roman legions in Alexandria to swear allegiance to Vespasian as emperor.

1097  Battle of Dorylaeum: Crusaders under Bohemond of Taranto defeated a Seljuk army under Qilich Arslan I.

1520  La Noche Triste: Joint Mexican Indian force led by Aztecs under Cuitláhuac defeated Spanish Conquistadors under Hernán Cortés.

1569  Union of Lublin: The Kingdom of Poland and Great Duchy of Lithuania confirm a real union, the united countrywas called the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth or the Republic of Both Nations.

1690  Glorious Revolution: Battle of the Boyne ( in Julian calendar).

1770 Lexell’s Comet passed closer to the Earth than any other comet in recorded history, approaching to a distance of 0.0146 a.u.

1782  American privateers attacked Lunenburg, Nova Scotia.

1837 A system of the civil registration of births, marriages and deaths was established in England and Wales.

1855 Quinault Treaty signed, Quinault and Quileute ceded their land to the United States.

1858  The joint reading of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace’s papers on evolution to the Linnean Society.

1862  The Russian State Library was founded.

1862  American Civil War: The Battle of Malvern Hill – final battle in the Seven Days Campaign, part of the George B. McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign.

1863  Keti Koti, Emancipation Day in Suriname, marking the abolition of slavery by the Netherlands.

1863 – American Civil War: The Battle of Gettysburg began.

1867  The British North America Act, 1867 took effect as the Constitution of Canada, creating the Canadian Confederation and the federal dominion of Canada; John A. Macdonald was sworn in as the first Prime Minister.

1869 William Strunk Jr., American grammarian, was born (d. 1946).

1879 Charles Taze Russell published the first edition of the religious magazine The Watchtower.

1881  The world’s first international telephone call was made between St. Stephen, New Brunswick, Canada, and Calais, Maine., United States.

1881 General Order 70, the culmination of the Cardwell-Childers reforms of the British Army, came into effect.

1885 The United States terminated reciprocity and fishery agreement with Canada.

1892 The Homestead Strike, a strike by the Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel Workers against the Carnegie Steel Company, began.

1898  Spanish-American War: The Battle of San Juan Hill was fought in Santiago de Cuba.

1899 Thomas A. Dorsey, American composer, was born (d. 1993).

1899 Charles Laughton, English actor, was born (d. 1962).

1903 Amy Johnson, English pilot, was born (d. 1941).

1906 Estée Lauder, American entrepreneur, was born (d. 2004).

1908 SOS was adopted as the international Distress signal.

1915 Leutnant Kurt Wintgens achieved the first known aerial victory with a synchronized gun-equipped fighter plane, the Fokker M.5K/MG Eindecker.

1916 Olivia de Havilland, Japanese-born British-American actress, was born.

1916  World War I: First day on the Somme – On the first day of the Battle of the Somme 19,000 soldiers of the British Army were killed and 40,000 wounded.

1921 The Communist Party of China was founded.

1928 Bobby Day, American musician was born, (d 1990).

1931  United Airlines began service (as Boeing Air Transport).

1933 The Canadian Parliament suspended all Chinese immigration.

1934 Jean Marsh, English actress, was born.

1934 Sydney Pollack, American film director, was born (d. 2008).

1935  Regina, Saskatchewan police and Royal Canadian Mounted Police ambushed strikers participating in On-to-Ottawa-Trek.

1935 – Grant Park Music Festival began its tradition of free summer symphonic music concert series in Chicago’s Grant Park which continues as the United States’ only annual free outdoor classical music concert series.

1942  World War II: First Battle of El Alamein.

1942  Australian Federal Government became sole collector of Income Tax (State Income Tax Abolished).

1943 Tokyo City merged with Tokyo Prefecture and was dissolved. Since then, no city in Japan has had the name “Tokyo“. (Present-day Tokyo is not a city.)

1945 Deborah Harry, American musician (Blondie), was born.

1947  The Philippine Air Force was established.

1948  Quaid-i-Azam inaugurated Pakistan’s central bank, the State Bank of Pakistan.

1951 Fred Schneider, American singer (The B-52′s), was born.

1952 Dan Aykroyd, Canadian actor, was born.

1953 Jadranka Kosor, Prime Minister of Croatia, was born.

1953 – Lawrence Gonzi, Maltese Prime Minister, was born.

1958  The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation linked television broadcasting across Canada via microwave.

1958 Flooding of Canada’s St. Lawrence Seaway began.

1959  The Party of the African Federation held its constitutive conference.

1959  Specific values for the international yard, avoirdupois pound and derived units (e.g. inch, mile and ounce) were adopted after agreement between the U.S., U.K. and other commonwealth countries.

1960  Independence of Somalia.

1960 – Ghana became a Republic and Kwame Nkrumah became its first President.

1961 Diana, Princess of Wales, was born (d. 1997).

1962  Independence of Rwanda.

1962  Independence of Burundi.

1963  ZIP Codes were introduced for United States mail.

1963 – The British Government admitted that former diplomat Kim Philby had worked as a Soviet agent.

1967 – The European Community was formally created out of a merger with the Common Market, the European Coal and Steel Community, and the European Atomic Energy Commission.

1967 – Canada celebrated the 100th anniversary of the British North America Act, 1867, which officially made Canada its own federal dominion.

1968  The CIA’s Phoenix Program was officially established.

1968 – The Nuclear non-proliferation treaty was signed in Washington, D.C., London and Moscow by sixty-two countries.

1968 – Formal separation of the United Auto Workers from the AFL-CIO.

1970  President General Yahya Khan abolished One-Unit of West Pakistan restoring the provinces.

1972  The first Gay Pride march in England.

1976  Portugal granted autonomy to Madeira.

1978 The Northern Territory in Australia is granted Self-Government.

1979  Sony introduced the Walkman.

1980  O Canada officially became the national anthem of Canada.

1981  The Wonderland Murders occurred in the early morning hours, allegedly masterminded by businessman and drug dealer Eddie Nash.

1983 A North Korean Ilyushin Il-62 jet crashed into the Fouta Djall Mountains in Guinea-Bissau, killing all 23 people on board.

1987 American radio station WFAN in New York City was launched as the world’s first all-sports radio station.

1988  The government announced that it had agreed to the Waitangi Tribunal’s recommendation that Bastion Point in Auckland be returned to Ngati Whatua ownership.

Bastion Point land returned

1991 The Warsaw Pact was officially dissolved at a meeting in Prague.

1997 China resumed sovereignty over the city-state of Hong Kong, ending 156 years of British colonial rule.

1999  The Scottish Parliament was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth on the day that legislative powers were officially transferred from the old Scottish Office in London to the new devolved Scottish Executive in Edinburgh.

2000 – The Oresund Bridge, connecting Sweden and Denmark, opened for traffic.

2002 The International Criminal Court was established to prosecute individuals for genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes, and the crime of aggression.

2002 – A Bashkirian Airlines (flight 2937) Tupolev TU-154 and a DHL Boeing 757 collided in mid-air over Ueberlingen, killing 71.

2004 Saturn Orbit insertion of Cassini-Huygens began at 01:12 UTC and ended at 02:48 UTC.

2006 – The first operation of Qinghai-Tibet Railway in China.

2007 Smoking in England was banned in all public indoor spaces. With the ban already in force in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, this means it is illegal to smoke in indoor public places anywhere in the UK. The ban was also put into effect in Australia.

2008 Rioting erupted in Mongolia in response to allegations of fraud surrounding the 2008 legislative elections.

2009  Croatian Prime Minister Ivo Sanader resigned giving no specific reason. Jadranka Kosor was announced as the next Prime Minister, the first woman ever to hold the post.

2013 – Croatia became the 28th member of the European Union.

2013 – The United Nations mission MINUSMA began its operative mandate in Mali.

2013 – Neptune‘s moon S/2004 N 1 was discovered.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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