8/10

April 25, 2015

8/10 in NZ History’s Anzac Day quiz.


And The Band Played Waltzing Matilda

April 25, 2015

Peter Williams says this song should be compulsory Anzac Day listening:

There’s a song that should be compulsory listening before ANZAC Day on Saturday.

“And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda” was written by Scottish born Adelaide singer-songwriter Eric Bogle in 1971.

That was a time when attendances at ANZAC Day Dawn Parades were sparse.

A time when – because of the Vietnam conflict – young people especially didn’t want to remember wars and those who fought in them.

A time when there was a real possibility that the annual remembrance of Gallipoli would fade away a long, long time before a centenary commemoration.

So in keeping with the times, Bogle wrote lyrics highlighting the horrors of Gallipoli and in the process emerged with some of the most damning and haunting words ever written about war and its after effects. . .


Saturday soapbox

April 25, 2015

Saturday’s soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse but not to abuse.
Desley Simpson's photo.

 Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives … You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours … You, the mothers who sent their sons from faraway countries, wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well. – Mustafa Kemal Atatürk


April 25 in history

April 25, 2015

1214  King Louis IX of France was born (d. 1270).

1228 Conrad IV of Germany was born (d. 1254).

1284 King Edward II of England was born (d. 1327).

1599 Oliver Cromwell, English statesman, was born (d. 1658).

1607 Eighty Years’ War: The Dutch fleet destroyed the anchored Spanish fleet at Gibraltar.

1707 The Habsburg army was defeated by Bourbon army at Almansa in the War of the Spanish Succession.

1775 Charlotte of Spain, Spanish Infanta and queen of Portugal, was born (d. 1830).

1792  Highwayman Nicolas J. Pelletier became the first person executed by guillotine.

1792 – La Marseillaise was composed by Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle.

1829 Charles Fremantle arrived in the HMS Challenger off the coast of modern-day Western Australia prior to declaring the Swan River Colony for the United Kingdom.

1846 Thornton Affair: Open conflict began over the disputed border of Texas, triggering the Mexican-American War.

1847 The last survivors of the Donner Party were out of the wilderness.

1849 The Governor General of Canada, Lord Elgin, sigeds the Rebellion Losses Bill, outraging Montreal’s English population and triggering the Montreal Riots.

1859 British and French engineers broke ground for the Suez Canal.

1862  American Civil War: Forces under Union Admiral David Farragut captured the Confederate city of New Orleans, Louisiana.

1864 American Civil War: The Battle of Marks’ Mills.

1873 Walter de la Mare, English poet, was born (d. 1956).

1898 Spanish-American War: The United States declared war on Spain.

1901 New York became the first U.S. state to require automobile license plates.

1905 George Nepia, New Zealand rugby player was born (d. 1986).

George Nepia.jpg

1915 New Zealand troops landed at Gallipoli.

NZ troops land at Gallipoli
 
1916 Easter Rebellion: The United Kingdom declared martial law in Ireland.

1916 – Anzac Day was commemorated for the first time, on the first anniversary of the landing at Anzac Cove.

1917 Ella Fitzgerald, American singer, was born (d. 1996).

1927 Albert Uderzo, French cartoonist, was born.

1929  Yvette Williams First New Zealand woman to win an Olympic gold medal, was born.

1932 Foundation of the Korean People’s Army of North Korea. “4.25″ appeared on the flags of the KPA Ground Force and the KPA Naval Force.

1932 William Roache, British television actor (Coronation Street), was born.

1938 U.S. Supreme Court delivereds opinion in Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins and overturned a century of federal common law.

1939  DC Comics published its second major superhero in Detective Comics #27; – Batman.

1940  Al Pacino, American actor, was born.

1943 The Demyansk Shield for German troops in commemoration of Demyansk Pocket was instituted.

1944 The United Negro College Fund was incorporated.

1945 Elbe Day: United States and Soviet troops met in Torgau along the River Elbe, cutting the Wehrmacht in two, a milestone in the approaching end of World War II in Europe.

1945 – The Nazi occupation army surrendered and left Northern Italy after a general partisan insurrection by the Italian resistance movement; the puppet fascist regime dissolved and Mussolini tried to escape. This day is taken as symbolic of the Liberation of Italy.

1945 – Fifty nations gathered in San Francisco to begin the United Nations Conference on International Organisations.

1945 Last German troops retreated from Finland’s soil in Lapland, ending the Lapland War.

1948 Yu Shyi-kun, former Premier of Taiwan, was born.

1953 Francis Crick and James D. Watson published Molecular structure of nucleic acids: a structure for deoxyribose nucleic acid describing the double helix structure of DNA.

1959  The St. Lawrence Seaway, linking the North American Great Lakes and the Atlantic Ocean, officially opened to shipping.

1961 Robert Noyce was granted a patent for an integrated circuit.

1963 – a six-strong New Zealand civilian surgical team arrived in Qui Nhon, South Vietnam as part of the Colombo Plan assistance programme.

1966 The city of Tashkent was destroyed by a huge earthquake.

1972  Vietnam War: Nguyen Hue Offensive – The North Vietnamese 320th Division forced 5,000 South Vietnamese troops to retreat and traps about 2,500 others northwest of Kontum.

1974 Carnation Revolution: A leftist military coup in Portugal restored democracy after more than forty years as a corporate authoritarian state.

1975 As North Vietnamese forces closed in on the South Vietnamese capital Saigon, the Australian Embassy was closed and evacuated, almost ten years to the day since the first Australian troop commitment to South Vietnam.

1976 Chicago Cubs’ outfielder, Rick Monday, rescued the American flag from two protestors who had run on to the field at Dodger Stadium. The two people covered the flag In lighter fluid but before the match was put to the flag, Monday, sprinted in and grabbed it away from them.

1981  More than 100 workers were exposed to radiation during repairs of a nuclear power plant in Tsuruga.

1982 Israel completed its withdrawal from the Sinai peninsula per the Camp David Accords.

1983 American schoolgirl Samantha Smith was invited to visit the Soviet Union by its leader Yuri Andropov after he read her letter in which she expressed fears about nuclear war.

1983 – Pioneer 10 traveled beyond Pluto’s orbit.

1986  Mswati III was crowned King of Swaziland, succeeding his father Sobhuza II.

1988 In Israel, John Demjanuk was sentenced to death for war crimes committed in World War II.

1990  The Hubble Telescope was deployed into orbit from the Space Shuttle Discovery.

2003 The Human Genome Project came to an end 2.5 years before first anticipated.

2005 The final piece of the Obelisk of Axum was returned to Ethiopia after being stolen by the invading Italian army in 1937.

2005 Bulgaria and Romania signed accession treaties to join the European Union.

2005 – 107 died in Amagasaki rail crash in Japan.

2007  Boris Yeltsin‘s funeral – the first to be sanctioned by the Russian Orthodox Church for a head of state since the funeral of Emperor Alexander III in 1894.

2010: Flight Lieutenant Madsen,  Flying Officer Dan Gregory and Corporal Ben Carson, were killed when the Iroquois they were in crashed on its way to a Wellington Anzac Day service.

2011 – At least 300 people were killed in deadliest tornado outbreak in the Southern United States since the 1974 Super Outbreak.

Sourced from NZ History Online, Wikipedia & Manawatu Standard


Word of the day

April 24, 2015

Wlatsome – abominable; loathsome; disgusting; detestable; repulsive; hate-worthy.


Rural round-up

April 24, 2015

100 years 100 horses unites community:

The tale behind this Saturday’s 20km trek by 100 horses and riders to honour their Anzac war dead has galvanised rural communities around Waikari, north Canterbury, even after the worst drought for 60 years.

On Anzac Day, a spectacular remembrance called ‘100 Years, 100 Horses’, assisted by a Fonterra Grass Roots Fund donation, will see 100 riders in formation – many of them dressed in replica gear from World War I. They will pay tribute, not just to the fallen, but to the community spirit behind the Canterbury Mounted Rifles.

Fonterra’s Grass Roots Fund was touched by the story of the Rifles, part of the New Zealand Mounted Rifle Brigade which left Lyttelton in 1914 for the conflict in Turkey with just under 2000 men and over 2000 horses. The north Canterbury townships of the Hurunui district – Waikari, Hurunui, Mason Flats, Peaks and Hawarden – provided 187 of the riders, 42 of whom did not return. . .

Landowners ease path to Tinui Cross, NZ’s first Anzac memorial  – Gerard Hutching:

Farmers and landowners in the Tinui district of the Wairarapa have been “superb” over the creation of a walkway across their land to the historic Tinui Anzac Cross.

The first Anzac memorial built in New Zealand, the cross was built in 1916 on top of Mount Maunsell, or Tinui Taipo as it is known locally.

It has long been a tradition for locals to walk the three kilometres from the Tinui cemetery to the cross on Anzac Day, but in recent years numbers have grown.

Chairman of the Tinui Parish Anzac Trust, Alan Emerson, said the Trust had wanted to establish informal access to the cross for a number of years, and a route through Tinui Forest Park and a neighbouring farm belonging to Mike and Lesley Hodgins proved most suitable. . . .

Dealing weeds a crushing blow – Time Cronshaw:

Frustrated by weeds infiltrating his crops Aussie farmer Ray Harrington borrowed coal mining technology to come up with an invention turning heads internationally, writes Tim Cronshaw.

Crushing was the final C option that farmer-inventor Ray Harrington turned to for eliminating persistent weeds on his Western Australia farm.

“I knew we would have to do something different to stave off the impending (herbicide) resistance and knew what was coming. That is why I decided to build in my mind what I dubbed as as the Big C project. We knew the chaff (coming from the header) when we harvested crops contained 98 per cent of the weed seeds and I had to catch the chaff, cart it, cook it, crush it or cremate it and that was the project in my head.” . . .

Bees show taste for toxic pesticides – study:

A New Zealand bee scientist says new international research that shows bees may be getting hooked on some types of pesticides, only paints part of a wider picture.

A study published in the science journal Nature this week shows bees prefer food laced with neonicotinoids in lab tests undertaken at Newcastle University.

Neonicotinoids are long-lasting insecticides which are primarily used to coat the seeds of plants, making them toxic to all insects when they grow.

There is international debate on whether bees are affected by them. . .

Horticulture production exceeds $7 billion:

Plant & Food Research is a New Zealand-based science company providing research and development that adds value to fruit, vegetable, crop and food products.

New Zealand’s horticultural production has exceeded $7 billion for the first time, according to the latest edition of the industry statistics publication Fresh Facts. . .

 


Friday’s answers

April 24, 2015

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said:  The two most powerful warriors are patience and time.?

2.  What are the first two lines of this verse:

At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

3.  It’s lutte in French,  lotta in Italian, lucha in Spanish and whawhai in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What are the main ingredients in Anzac biscuits?

5. Which book about or set during a war would you recommend?

Points for answers:

Willdwan got four.

Andrei got four (#2 asked for the first two lines).

J Bloggs got four.

Teletxt also got four and a bonus for extra information which unfortunately didn’t include the answer to the question – the first two lines of that verse.

In the spirit of the day you all win an electronic batch of Anzac biscuits.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,591 other followers

%d bloggers like this: