Sowell says

November 13, 2018

 


Rural round-up

November 13, 2018

Rural health service gains outlined in plan – John Gibb:

Moves to create a “virtual campus” for rural health training would also  improve health services in New Zealand’s rural towns, including those in Otago, Dr Garry Nixon says.

Dr Nixon, who is University of Otago associate dean rural and works at Dunstan Hospital in Clyde, makes the point in an article on the national “virtual campus proposal”, recently published in the New Zealand Medical Journal.

The article’s co-authors include colleagues at Auckland University and AUT. . . 

Dairy farm open day attracts hundreds – John Gibb:

Many more people flocked to an Outram dairy farm open day at the weekend than had visited last year, farmer Duncan Wells said yesterday.

Farmers Duncan and Anne-Marie Wells own Huntly Rd Dairies, which attracted about 140 visitors during a Fonterra Open Gates event last year.

But yesterday, attendance rose more than threefold and about 430 people visited during the latest dairy farm awareness-raising event, Mr Wells said. . . 

Six months as a taxi company owner, six months as an apple picker

Philmy Chite splits his years into two.

One half of the year he’s focuses on his taxi business in the Solomon Islands. The other half of the year he’s in Hawke’s Bay, picking apples.

Chite landed back in Hastings this week with a group of 16 others from the Solomon Islands as part of the RSE (Recognised Seasonal Employer) scheme.

It’s the sixth year in a row he’s done it, and he loves it. . . 

World-first NZ tech changing global agriculture landscape:

New Zealand agritech companies are creating world-first technology to help feed the world and lead the way in their industry, AgritechNZ chief executive Peter Wren-Hilton says.

Technology is making life easier, from eco-friendly cars to faster software and tech improvements are benefitting Kiwis in everyday life, he says.

“The same goes for agritech innovation such as crop protection and plant biotechnology which is improving the lives of farmers and consumers around New Zealand. . . 

From plastic to posts:

Anchor™ Light Proof™ milk bottles will soon be appearing on farms across New Zealand, but you won’t find them in the fridge.

Fonterra has teamed up with Kiwi-owned start up, Future Post™, to turn milk bottles and other soft plastics into fence posts for kiwi farms.

Fonterra Brands New Zealand’s (FBNZ) Sustainability and Environment Manager, Larisa Thathiah, says the posts are an innovative new way for farmers to improve their on-farm sustainability.

“This partnership provides farmers with an environmentally-friendly fencing option, made from the packaging of our farmers’ milk, which is pretty special,” says Larisa. . . 

Hemp seed food products now legal in New Zealand:

A small yet significant victory occurred on Tuesday as Government announced formal regulatory changes, which will mean that hemp seed products will be legal for sale and consumption as from 12 November 2018.

This change in legislation means that in addition to hemp seed oil (which has been legal since 2003) items such as de-hulled hemp seed, hemp seed protein powder, hemp seed beverages and hemp seed snack bars will now all be able to be legally sold for human consumption in New Zealand. . . 

Champion sharemilkers’ dairy farm placed on the market:

A dairy farm owned by two former regional Sharemilker of the Year winners has been placed on the market for sale as part of a plan to diversify their rural business interests.

The 140.6-hectare farm located some 19 kilometres south-west of Opotiki in the Eastern Bay of Plenty is owned by 2001 Bay of Plenty Sharemilker of the Year title winners Dean and Sharyn Petersen. It is one of three dairy and diary-support farms the Petersen’s own in the region.

The property sustains milking of 320 cows on a De Laval system – averaging 119,620 kilogrammes of milk solids per season over the past four years, as well as producing a substantial maize silage tonnage annually for stock feed. . .


NZEI letting teachers down

November 13, 2018

If unions don’t understand why they aren’t always well regarded they need look no further than this:

The teachers’ strike is going ahead tomorrow because the venues for union meetings were already booked.

The primary teachers’ union offered that explanation when asked why the pay offer it received on Thursday wasn’t enough to avert next week’s action. . . 

The NZEI’s teacher lead negotiator Liam Rutherford told the Weekend Collective the offer came through really late in the piece.

“And so to that extent, we didn’t consider calling off the strike because we’ve got venues booked around country.”

Rutherford says they have been really flexible, but when you already have so many meeting venues booked, a half day to consider an offer is not enough. . . 

The Employment Relations Authority recommends teachers accept the offer.

Teachers have a lot of sympathy for their claims not just for more pay but also for better conditions.

But continuing with  strikes before considering the latest offer will do them and their cause absolutely no good.

That the union justifies continuing strike action because it has booked meeting rooms will erode sympathy further.

NZEI is letting teachers down and this nonsense supports the argument that too often unions do what’s good for unions, not their members.


Quote of the day

November 13, 2018

We’ve got to find ways of confronting the issues that divide – and at the heart of cultural issues, you often find religions. George Carey who celebrates his 83rd birthday today.


November 13 in history

November 13, 2018

354 – Augustine of Hippo, Roman bishop and theologian, was born (d. 430).

1002 – English king Æthelred II ordered the killing of all Danes in England, in the St. Brice’s Day massacre.

1160 – Louis VII of France married Adele of Champagne.

1642 – First English Civil War: Battle of Turnham Green – Royalist forces withdrew in the face of the Parliamentarian army and failed to take London

1715 Dorothea Erxleben, first German female medical doctor, was born (d. 1762).

1841 – James Braid first saw a demonstration of animal magnetism, which led to his study of the subject he eventually called hypnotism.

1850 Robert Louis Stevenson, Scottish writer, was born (d. 1894).

1851 – The Denny Party landed at Alki Point, the first settlers in what would become Seattle, Washington.

1864 – The new Constitution of Greece was adopted.

1869 – Helene Stöcker, German author and activist, was born (d. 1943).

1869  – Ariadna Tyrkova-Williams, Russian-American activist, journalist, and politician, was born (d. 1962).

1887 – Bloody Sunday clashes in central London.

1896 – Te Maari, a crater at the northern end of the Tongariro range, erupted.

1901 – The 1901 Caister Lifeboat Disaster.

1906 Eva Zeisel, Hungarian-American potter and industrial designer, was born (d. 2011).

1916 – Prime Minister of Australia Billy Hughes was expelled from the Labor Party over his support for conscription.

1927 – The Holland Tunnel opened to traffic as the first Hudson River vehicle tunnel linking New Jersey to New York City.

1934 – Peter Arnett, New Zealand-born American journalist, was born.

1935  – George Carey, English archbishop and theologian, was born.

1941 – World War II: The aircraft carrier HMS Ark Royal was torpedoed by U 81.

1942 – World War II: Naval Battle of Guadalcanal – U.S. and Japanese ships engaged in an intense, close-quarters surface naval engagement.

1947 – Russia completed development of the AK-47, one of the first proper assault rifles.

1950 – General Carlos Delgado Chalbaud, President of Venezuela, was assassinated.

1954 – Great Britain defeated France to capture the first ever Rugby League World Cup in Paris.

1955 Whoopi Goldberg, American actress, comedian, and singer, was born.

1956 – The United States Supreme Court declared Alabama and Montgomery, Alabama laws requiring segregated buses illegal, ending theMontgomery Bus Boycott.

1965 – The SS Yarmouth Castle burned and sank 60 miles off Nassau with the loss of 90 lives.

1969 – Vietnam War: Anti-war protesters in Washington, D.C. staged a symbolic March Against Death.

1970 – Bhola cyclone: A 150-mph tropical cyclone hit the Ganges Delta region of East Pakistan (now Bangladesh), killing an estimated 500,000 people in one night. This is regarded as the 20th century’s worst natural disaster.

1971 – The American space probe, Mariner 9, became the first spacecraft to orbit another planet successfully, swinging into its planned trajectory around Mars.

1974 – Carl Hoeft, New Zealand rugby player, All Black, was born.

1982 – The Vietnam Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, D.C. after a march to its site by thousands of Vietnam War veterans.

1985 – The volcano Nevado del Ruiz erupted and melted a glacier, causing a lahar that buried Armero, Colombia, killing approximately 23,000 people.

1985 – Xavier Suarez was sworn in as Miami, Florida’s first Cuban-born mayor.

1988 – Mulugeta Seraw, an Ethiopian law student in Portland, Oregon was beaten to death by members of the Neo-Nazi group East Side White Pride.

1990 – David Gray shot dead 13 people, in the Aramoana Massacre.

David Gray kills 13 at Aramoana

1992 – The High Court of Australia ruled in Dietrich v The Queen that although there was no absolute right to have publicly funded counsel, in most circumstances a judge should grant any request for an adjournment or stay when an accused was unrepresented.

1994 – In a referendum voters in Sweden decided to join the European Union.

1995 – A truck-bomb exploded outside a US-operated Saudi Arabian National Guard training center in Riyadh, killing five Americans and two Indians.

2000 – Philippine House Speaker Manuel B. Villar, Jr. passed the articles of impeachment against Philippine President Joseph Estrada.

2001 – War on Terrorism: US President George W. Bush signs an executive order allowing military tribunals against foreigners suspected of connections to terrorist acts or planned acts on the United States.

2002 – The oil tanker Prestige sank off the Galician coast and causes a huge oil spill.

2005 – Andrew Stimpson, a 25-year old British man, was reported as the first person proven to have been “cured” of HIV.

2007 – An explosion hit the south wing of the House of Representatives of the Philippines killing four people, including Congressman Wahab Akbar, and wounding six.

2007 – Russia officially withdrew from the Soviet-era Batumi military base, Georgia.

2012 – A total solar eclipse occurred in parts of Australia and the South Pacific.

2015 – A set of coordinated terror attacks in Paris, France including multiple shootings, explosions, and a hostage crisis in the 10th arrondissement of Paris and the 11th arrondissement of Paris killed 130 people, seven attackers, and injured 368 others, with at least 80 critically wounded.

2015 – WT1190F, a temporary satellite of Earth, impacted just southeast of Sri Lanka.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


365 days of gratitude

November 12, 2018

My first taste of asparagus was that sorry, soggy excuse for a vegetable that comes in tins.

It took fresh asparagus to convert me to a fan and this year we have our own to harvest.

We planted it two years ago and followed the instructions from a garden guru religiously – letting it grow and go to seed the first two season and only this, the third season have we harvested it.

We’re eating it in salads, roulades, by itself and as a side with lunch and dinner and it’s delicious.

Today I’m grateful for home-grown asparagus.


Word of the day

November 12, 2018

Bothy – a small hut or cottage, especially one for housing farmhands or labourers, or for use as a mountain refuge; a basic shelter, usually left unlocked and available for anyone to use free of charge.


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