Friday’s answers

November 22, 2014

Thursday’s questions were:

1. Who said: There exists no politician in India daring enough to attempt to explain to the masses that cows can be eaten.?

2. Who/what are the characters Graceless, Aimless, Feckless and Pointless and in which book by which author would you find them?

3. 3. It’s laitier in French, latteria in Italian, lechería in Spanish and miraka in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is an abomasum?

5. What’s your favourite dish/recipe using cheese?

Points for answers:

Andrei got 4 2/3 (#2 had three parts and I’m sure you knew the author) with a bonus for a better memory than I’ve got – I had a suspicion I’d asked questions about Cold Comfort Farm before but wasn’t certain).

Gravedodger wins a virtual roulade (with asparagus and Windsor Blue cheese) for five right – the Italian, Spanish and Maori don’t translate as milkman but the French does so I’m accepting it).

Alwyn gets three and 2/3 (missed the author in #2).

J Bloggs gets 3.

Answers follow the break:

Read the rest of this entry »


Saturday soapbox

November 22, 2014

Saturday’s  soapbox is yours to use as you will – within the bounds of decency and absence of defamation. You’re welcome to look back or forward, discuss issues of the moment, to pontificate, ponder or point us to something of interest, to educate, elucidate or entertain, amuse, bemuse or simply muse. but not to abuse.
Do you agree or disagree?


November 22 in history

November 22, 2014

498 – Symmachus was elected Pope in the Lateran Palace, while Laurentius was elected Pope in Santa Maria Maggiore.

845 – The first King of all Brittany, Nominoe defeated the Frankish king Charles the Bald at the Battle of Ballon near Redon.

1307 – Pope Clement V issued the papal bull Pastoralis Praeeminentiae which instructed all Christian monarchs in Europe to arrest all Templars and seize their assets.

1574 – Discovery of the Juan Fernández Islands off Chile.

1635 – Dutch colonial forces on Taiwan launched a pacification campaign against native villages, resulting in Dutch control of the middle and south of the island.

1718 –  British pirate Edward Teach ( “Blackbeard“) was killed in battle with a boarding party led by Lieutenant Robert Maynard.

1808  Thomas Cook, British travel entrepreneur, was born (d. 1892).

1812 – War of 1812: 17 Indiana Rangers were killed at the Battle of Wild Cat Creek.

1819  George Eliot, (Mary Ann Evans) British novelist, was born (d. 1880).

1830 – Charles Grey, (2nd Earl Grey), became Prime Minister of the United Kingdom.

1837 – Canadian journalist and politician William Lyon Mackenzie called for a rebellion against Great Britain in his essay “To the People of Upper Canada”, published in his newspaper The Constitution.

1869 – In Dumbarton, Scotland, the clipper Cutty Sark was launched – one of the last clippers ever to be built, and the only one still surviving to this day.

1890 Charles de Gaulle, President of France  was born (d. 1970).

1899 Hoagy Carmichael, American composer, was born (d. 1981).

1908 – The Congress of Manastir established the Albanian alphabet.

1913 – Benjamin Britten, British composer, was born (d. 1976).

1917 Jon Cleary, Australian author, was born (d 2010).

1928 – The premier performance of Ravel’s Boléro in Paris.

1932 – Robert Vaughn, American actor, was born.

1935 – The China Clipper took off from Alameda, California for its first commercial flight, reaching its destination, Manila, a week later.

1939 General Bernard Freyburg took command  of the British Expeditionary Force.

Freyberg takes command of NZ expeditionary force

1940 –  Following the initial Italian invasion, Greek troops counterattack into Italian-occupied Albania and capture Korytsa.

1943  Billie Jean King, American tennis player, was born.

1943 – Lebanon gained independence from France.

1954 – The Humane Society of the United States was founded.

1958  Jamie Lee Curtis, American actress, was born.

1963 – In Dallas, Texas, US President John F. Kennedy was killed and Texas Governor John B. Connally seriously wounded.

1963 – US Vice-President Lyndon B. Johnson was sworn in as the 36th President of the United States.

1967 – UN Security Council Resolution 242 is adopted by the UN Security Council, establishing a set of the principles aimed at guiding negotiations for an Arab-Israeli peace settlement.

1973 – The Italian Fascist organization Ordine Nuovo was disbanded.

1974 – The United Nations General Assembly granted the Palestine Liberation Organization observer status.

1975 –  Juan Carlos was declared King of Spain following the death of Francisco Franco.

1977 – British Airways started a regular London to New York City supersonic Concorde service.

1986 – Mike Tyson defeated Trevor Berbick to become youngest Heavyweight champion in boxing history.

1987 – Two Chicago television stations were hijacked by an unknown pirate dressed as Max Headroom.

1988 – The first prototype  B-2 Spirit stealth bomber was revealed.

1989 – In West Beirut, a bomb exploded near the motorcade of Lebanese President René Moawad, killing him.

1990 – British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher withdrew from the Conservative Party leadership election, confirming the end of her premiership.

1995 – Toy Story was released as the first feature-length film created completely using computer-generated imagery.

2002 – In Nigeria, more than 100 people were killed at an attack aimed at the contestants of the Miss World contest.

2004 – The Orange Revolution began in Ukraine, resulting from the presidential elections.

2005 – Angela Merkel became the first female Chancellor of Germany.

2012 – Cease-fire began between Hamas in the Gaza Strip and Israel after eight days of violence and 150 deaths.

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


Word of the day

November 21, 2014

Canorous – melodious, musical;  resonant; pleasing in sound.


Rural round-up

November 21, 2014

Canterbury’s Patoa Farms wins South Island Farmer of the Year for 2014:

Patoa Farms Ltd, a large scale free-farmed pig breeding and finishing operation at Hawarden in North Canterbury, has won the Lincoln University Foundation’s South Island Farmer of the Year competition for 2014.

The finals held yesterday evening at Lincoln University saw four very high calibre entrants vie for the top prize of a $20,000 travel grant for business study.

Foundation Chief Judge Nicky Hyslop said Steve and Josie Sterne, with daughter Holly Sterne, edged out stiff competition with their impressive growth, technical excellence, efficiency of production and strategic focus. They demonstrated that it was possible to achieve at the highest levels of farming technology and business management in an outdoor free-roaming stock operation. . .

Federated Farmers leader wants farmers to report rural crimes:

Federated Farmers Meat and Fibre Industry Group Chair Rick Powdrell says farmers aren’t diligent enough in reporting stock thefts from their properties.

“Unfortunately they might think the police aren’t interested or are too hard pressed to investigate,” he told the Meat and Fibre Council meeting in Wellington today.

“Federated Farmers surveyed members and our farmers have told us they don’t bother to report almost two-thirds of stock thefts.” . . .

CEO Successful Fellow:

NZ Landcare Trust CEO Dr. Nick Edgar has been awarded a Churchill Fellowship by the Winston Churchill Memorial Trust.

Dr Edgar’s Churchill Fellowship will involve examining local food system initiatives in Connecticut and Vermont, USA, that are creating economic and environmental improvement opportunities for farmers, producers and consumers.

In June 2013 Dr Edgar participated in a knowledge exchange workshop between land and water professionals from New Zealand and Vermont that was funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade. The workshop was focused on managing agricultural non-point source pollution, in particular, comparing the different policy, research and farm-based approaches being implemented between New Zealand and Vermont. Vermont was chosen for a comparison with New Zealand due to similarities in that State’s reliance on both agriculture and tourism to support its economy. A situation closely mirrored in New Zealand. . .

Dairy Awards Secures Future in Industry:

Participating in the New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards has turned dreams into reality for the 2014 New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year, Nick Bertram.

“I am pretty happy as we know that we have got job security in the dairy industry. We are 100% going 50:50 sharemilking. Entering the dairy awards has made our dreams become reality,” Mr Bertram says.

Entries are now being accepted online at www.dairyindustryawards.co.nz in the 2015 awards programme, including the New Zealand Sharemilker/Equity Farmer of the Year, New Zealand Farm Manager of the Year and New Zealand Dairy Trainee of the Year competitions.

All entries close on November 30. . . .

Wealthy Waikato farmers stonewall ‘foreign’ ownership:

Waikato dairying and grazing blocks going on the market for sale are remaining under the ownership of ‘local’ farmers who are far better financially resourced than their counterparts from other New Zealand provinces, according to the latest batch of rural real estate sales data.

Leading agency Bayleys has sold 11 of the 15 diary and grazing farms in the region to have gone under the auctioneer’s hammer over the past two months – with Waikato farmers outbidding hopefuls from Taranaki, Hawke’s Bay, Northland, Southland, and the Bay of Plenty on every occasion.

Bayleys Waikato country manager Mark Dawe said that while ‘out of town’ bidders were active on many of the farms going up for auction, they simply couldn’t foot it financially with the ‘local boys’, in what has been the busiest quarterly sales period since 2007… even with another month of selling days left. . .

Prices surging, but volumes steady in October Rural Property Market:

Summary
Data released today by the Real Estate Institute of NZ (“REINZ”) shows there were three fewer farm sales (-0.9%) for the three months ended October 2014 than for the three months ended October 2013. Overall, there were 346 farm sales in the three months to end of October 2014, compared to 347 farm sales for the three months ended September 2014 (-0.3%) and 349 farm sales for the three months to the end of October 2013. 1,920 farms were sold in the year to October 2014, 17.9% more than were sold in the year to October 2013.

The median price per hectare for all farms sold in the three months to October 2014 was $27,898 compared to $24,590 recorded for three months ended October 2013 (+13.5%). The median price per hectare rose 7.3% compared to September. . .

 

 


Thursday’s quiz on Friday

November 21, 2014

Whoops – a day late.

1. Who said: There exists no politician in India daring enough to attempt to explain to the masses that cows can be eaten.?

2. Who/what are the characters Graceless, Aimless, Feckless and Pointless and in which book by which author would you find them?

3. 3. It’s laitier in French, latteria in Italian, lechería in Spanish and miraka in Maori, what is it in English?

4. What is an abomasum?

5. What’s your favourite dish/recipe using cheese?


What’s the price of union votes?

November 21, 2014

Patrick Gower calls Andrew Little’s win of Labour’s leadership the great union rip-off.

“It’s a backdoor takeover by the unions. Simply, Andrew Little would not be Labour leader without the unions,” Gower said on Firstline this morning.

“He is the unions’ man; Little is a union man, and the unions have got their man into Labour’s top job.”

Gower says it’s ironic after trying “almost too hard” to give men and women an equal say – the ultimately doomed ‘man ban’ – that a small group of “union blokes” have effectively chosen the party’s new leader.

“Most of those delegates, according to one of the most senior sources in the Labour Party, are men… It’s just six unions out of about 150-odd in New Zealand. Just six of them get to have their say over this, and five of them actually rely on delegates – the union bosses, the union chiefs, the union heavies. They say who they want.” . .

They will also say what they want in return for those votes and it will be some big policy wins.

Unions not only inflicted on Labour a leader not favoured by either MPs or the wider membership and they will be doing their best to inflict union-friendly policy on the rest of us.


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