Rural round-up

September 4, 2018

Irrigators asked to reduce water use to restore Opuha Dam:

Irrigators taking water from the Opihi River are being asked to help restore dam levels by reducing water consumption.

A lack of rain over the winter has prompted concern about levels at the Opuha Dam in South Canterbury.

Canterbury Regional Council is requiring the company operating the dam to maintain a minimum flow in the river of 5.2 cubic metres per second when the lake is above 375-metres.

It is now at about 390-metres. . . 

All eyes on the US market for NZ beef producers:

While global beef prices have held up well in the first six months of 2018, a range of developments in the US market have the potential to affect global beef trade and impact New Zealand producers in the second half of the year, according to a recently-released industry report.

In its Beef Quarterly Q3 2018 – All Eyes on the US Protein Complex, agribusiness banking specialist Rabobank says activities in the US market have been the focus of attention in global protein trade in 2018 and were likely to remain so for the rest of the year. . .

One month until new animal welfare regulations:

New regulations to strengthen our animal welfare system will come into effect on 1 October 2018.

Ministry for Primary Industries Director for Animal Health and Welfare, Dr Chris Rodwell, says the 45 new regulations cover a range of species and activities from stock transport and farm husbandry procedures to companion and working animals like dogs and horses.

“With under a month to go until these new regulations come into effect, we want to encourage people, who are responsible for any type of animal, to check they are up to date in how they are looking after them,” says Dr Rodwell. . .

A little piece of Clandeboye in half a billion pizzas :

Some already call it the Riviera of the South and now Timaru could also be the pizza capital of New Zealand, as the region becomes the Southern Hemisphere’s largest producer of natural mozzarella cheese.

Fonterra’s Clandeboye site fired up its third new mozzarella line today, meaning it now produces enough of the revolutionary cheese to top more than half a billion pizzas a year.

The cheese, which is made from one of the Co-operative’s secret recipes, is made in hours rather than in months – the time traditional mozzarella takes. It’s destined for pizzas all over the world. Fonterra cheese already tops around 50% of the pizzas in China – one of the fastest growing pizza markets in the world. . .

Livestock grazing ‘vital’ to preserve uplands:

A DECADE-LONG study involving researchers from Yorkshire has claimed that grazing sheep and cattle are vital to maintaining the biodiversity of Britain’s moorlands.

Abandoning grazing on upland environments, which include the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors, would be “incredibly damaging”, researchers found, as it would disrupt important plant and bird communities that rely on each other to survive.

The first long-term study of its kind, which was carried out by ecologists at the Universities of Hull, Aberdeen and the James Hutton Institute, looked at the consequences of different grazing scenarios on multiple plant and animal groups, which consume each other in an upland “food web”. . .

Missouri becomes first state in US to regulate use of the word ‘meat’ – Zlati Meyer:

On Tuesday, Missouri becomes the first state in the country to have a law on the books that prohibits food makers to use the word “meat” to refer to anything other than animal flesh.

This takes aim at manufacturers of what has been dubbed fake or non-traditional meat.

Clean meat — also known as lab-grown meat — is made of cultured animal tissue cells, while plant-based meat is generally from ingredients such as soy, tempeh and seitan. . . 

Demand  brewing for former large-scale hop production operation:

A major agricultural operation which has previously produced one of New Zealand’s most exported high value yet little-known crops has been placed on the market for sale.

The 55.8-hectare site in the Motueka district of Riwaka was established as a hop growing plantation in the 1960s, before the operation was bought out by fruit and vegetable producer/marketer ENZAFruit New Zealand International Limited in the early 2000s and converted into an apple orchard. . .


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