Youth wing debate

26/08/2020

The Spinoff hosted a debate for representatives of the youth wings of six parties:

If the six youth wing leaders were feeling nervous about taking part in a debate filmed in front of a lively audience at the Auckland Town Hall, it didn’t show. One by one – or two, in the case of the Young Greens co-convenors – they strode onto the stage projecting what could only be described as an unnerving level of confidence. When they opened their mouths to speak, their political messages came out loud and clear.

“Let’s keep moving,” said Young Labour’s Princes Street chairperson Adam Brand. “Party vote Green,” said Danielle Marks, standing alongside fellow Young Greens co-convenor Matariki Roche. “Act is aspirational,” said Young Act president Felix Poole. “Back your future,” said Young NZ First chairperson Jay McLaren-Harris. “Look,” said Northern Young Nats chairperson Aryana Nafissi, “we need a National government”. . . 

The debate was moderated by Toby Manhire,

 

 


Teal deal for Question Time

19/03/2018

Green Party leader James Shaw has announced he’s gifting most of the party’s questions to the National Party.

James Shaw told Corin Dann on TVNZ’s Q+A programme this morning his party would gift its so-called ‘patsy’ questions to opposition parties as a way of holding the government to account. . .

CORIN Sure. Okay. Let’s get on to this issue. So I’m of the understanding that the Green Party is going to announce that you will give your what are called patsy questions in Parliament – so you get, what, one per session, is that right? Primary question – you’re going to give those questions to the Opposition for the rest of the term. Is that correct?

JAMES That’s right. So it’s about 42 questions this year and about 50 next year, based on what we currently know about the calendar. And that is because – and you know this from your time in the gallery, right – that patsy questions are basically a waste of everybody’s time.

CORIN They make the government look good.

JAMES Yeah, that’s right, but I think question time should be about holding the government to account. This is what we said when we were in Opposition. Now that we are in government, we felt that it was important for us to act consistently with what we said in Opposition.

CORIN But if you’re in government, why are you giving the Opposition an extra chance to bash you?

JAMES I know it sounds crazy, but we are crazy about democracy. So I know it seems like a weird move, but I honestly think that the democracy will be better served if question time does what it is supposed to do, which is to hold the government to account, and we are members of the government. I expect us to be held to account, not to use scripted questions to kind of tell some bright, shiny story. . .

It’s no surprise that National has welcomed the gift.

National Party Leader Simon Bridges has welcomed the Green Party’s decision to give the Opposition its allocated Oral Questions in Parliament to allow it to better hold the weak Ardern-Peters Government to account.

“I said when I became Leader that National would remain firmly focused on being an effective Opposition and in the past weeks we have continued to do that.

“That includes during Parliamentary Question Time when Opposition MPs get Ministers on their feet asking questions of importance to New Zealanders, and those efforts will now be bolstered by the Green Party’s decision.

“National will use the Green Party’s Questions as well its own to continue to focus on the issues that matter to New Zealanders – the economy, law and order, housing, public services and the environment.

“The Green Party’s willingness for this weak Government to be held to account is commendable and we will honour the spirit of this move by doing so strongly.” . . 

Labour and its leader Jacinda Ardern will be less than enthusiastic about this move from their support partner.

They may be thinking their week from hell could get worse: the Young Labour camp sexual assault mess; Defense Minister Ron Mark Ron Mark using Air Force helicopters like taxis; Ethnic Affairs Minister Salesa spending an eye-watering $30,186 on travel and now their support partner is suddenly a lot less supportive.

The Greens are sticking to principles on making a teal deal on patsy questions.

Jacinda Labour might not mind if they follow suit by withdrawing support for the wake-jumping Bill but New Zealand First leader Winston Peters will.

This move also raises another question – if the Greens can do a teal deal on questions, are they opening the door for a teal deal on a future coalition?

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Story behind stats

11/02/2013

Young Labour is shocked to hear of the latest household labour force survey which puts youth unemployment at 30.9%.

But youth unemployment isn’t at 30.9%.

Labour once again stands accused of putting the worst possible spin on youth education and training, Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment Minister Steven Joyce says.

“The reality is that the latest HLFS shows that just under 80 per cent of all 15-19 year olds in New Zealand are enrolled in education or training, with the total numbers up from 238,000 to 243,000 in the last quarter,” Mr Joyce says.

The survey shows that the number of young people who are both unemployed and not in education is 15,000.  While this is still too many, it represents only 4.8 per cent of the total cohort of 310,000.

An important point to note is that the headline HLFS unemployment percentage for 15-19 year olds is unusual in that it excludes the high number of young people who are in education and not in the labour market. . .

Any unemployment is concerning and youth unemployment is particularly so. Young people who go onto benefits without having worked are more likely to stay on them longer.

But the 30.9% is that Young Labour is shocked about is the percentage of people not in work which is a different and not nearly so shocking statistic.

When they get over their shock, Young Labour might like to ponder on the fact that youth unemployment increased when the then-Labour led government abolished youth rates.


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