Rural round-up

April 6, 2014

Dairying ‘growing the community’: farmer – Ruth Grundy:

May Murphy recalls an incident 30 years ago – she and her husband Robin were driving a friend, also involved in dairying, through Ikawai-Glenavy.

”When Robin told him: ‘In time this will all be dairying’ he thought he was joking – but it’s happened,” Mrs Murphy said.

Murphy Farms Ltd is run by Mr and Mrs Murphy together with son Bruce and daughter-in-law Lesa Murphy. Bruce and Lesa’s children, Jack (11), Harry (10) Katie (6) and Lily (3) are part of the family firm. . .

Genuine opportunities for a2 Milk – Dene Mackenzie:

Craigs Investment Partners has initiated coverage on The a2 Milk Company with a hold recommendation on the shares given the broad-based nature of growth opportunities.

The company will change its name from A2 Corporation to The a2 Milk Company on April 8. Managing director Geoffrey Babidge said the new name ”instantly and consistently” described the values and mission in a way the current trading names did not.

”It reflects our journey from early research and entrepreneurial pioneers in New Zealand to a unified global identity,” he said.

Craigs broker Chris Timms said a2 was ”a little bit frothy” but genuine and broad-based opportunities existed for the Dunedin-founded company. . .

Turn-out pleases organisers:

Planning for a sustainable future was the focus of a roadshow in Rangiora last week.

Rural Women New Zealand’s 2014 International Year of Family Farming roadshow rolled into the Rangiora Showgrounds on Friday to share ”good news stories” about the role of family farms now and in the future.

Development and marketing manager Kiera Jacobson said the focus was on family farms being sustainable, ”not just environmentally, but also financially and in our on-farm safety”. . .

Growing the country and shrinking waistlines:

A key part of Lincoln University’s remit for the future is ‘feeding the world’ – with significant emphasis on promoting food science and innovation within the national and international food sector.

In 2013, the Lincoln University Centre for Food Research and Innovation was established to promote innovation and collaboration with the food industry.

Centre Director and Professor of Food Science, Charles Brennan says food science has the potential to not only grow the economy, but also deliver national health benefits at the same time.

“Our aim is to create food that is convenient, nutritious and good value. By applying theoretical knowledge to the processing of foods, we are able to meet consumer demands for flavour and texture, as well as nutrition in terms of protein digestibility for human growth, and starch digestibility in relation to glucose levels. Food science and innovation are critical not only to the economic viability of New Zealand, but for the world economy as a whole.”. .

Lawyers to sponsor agri-tech scholarship

Canterbury law firm Tavendale and Partners and Lincoln University have announced a postgraduate scholarship to support applied knowledge and innovation in agri-tech.

The $6500 scholarship will be awarded annually to a postgraduate student studying at Lincoln University and specialising in the invention and application of smart agricultural technology.

The first scholarship will be available for the second semester of this year and then annually after that.  . .

Princess Anne’s Countryfile comments on gassing badgers and GM food stoke highly charged debate:

The Princess Royal has injected new controversy into the highly charged debate on the badger cull, calling for the mammals to be gassed in their setts.

But her intervention, in an interview with BBC’s Countryfile programme to be screened tomorrow, was welcomed yesterday by some West Country farmers frustrated by the Government’s failure to approve a further roll out of the shooting of badgers as part of the battle against bovine TB.

The Princess said: “If we want to control badgers the most humane way of doing it is to gas them.”

Her comments were immediately condemned by Rosie Woodroffe, of the Zoological Society, who said it was difficult to achieve lethal concentrations of gas in complex badger setts, and by Mark Jones, a vet and the director of the Humane Society. . . .

TB prevalence in Great Britain and New Zealand cattle:

In New Zealand in 1990 the proportion of TB in cattle was about 7 times greater than it was in Great Britain. However in 1997 the proportions were about equal. Currently (in 2011) the proportion in New Zealand is about 40 times less than what it is in Great Britain. Since the early nineties, control of the principal wildlife vector, the possum, in New Zealand has increased whilst in Great Britain since 1986 control of the principal wildlife vector, the badger, has reduced. . .

 


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