April 15 in history

April 15, 2010

On April 15:

1452 Leonardo da Vinci, Italian Renaissance polymath, was born.

1469 Guru Nanak Dev, the first of the ten Sikh Gurus, was born.

 

1632 Battle of Rain; Swedes under Gustavus Adolphus defeated the Holy Roman Empire during the Thirty Years’ War.

Schlacht bei Rain am Lech 1632.jpg
 

1641 Robert Sibbald, Scottish physician, was born.

1642 Suleiman II, Ottoman Sultan, was born.

1684 Catherine I of Russia, was born.

1710 William Cullen, Scottish physician, was born.

 

1715 Pocotaligo Massacre triggered the start of the Yamasee War in colonial South Carolina.

1738 Premiere in London of Serse (Xerxes) an Italian opera by George Frideric Handel.

1755 Samuel Johnson‘s A Dictionary of the English Language published in London.

 
JohnsonDictionary.png

1783 – Preliminary articles of peace ending Revolutionary War ratified.

Rev collage.png

1802 William Wordsworth and his sister, Dorothy saw a “long belt” of daffodils, inspiring him to pen I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud.

 

1841 Joseph E. Seagram, Canadian distillery founder, was born.

1843 Henry James, American author (, was born.

1865 Abraham Lincoln died after being shot the previous day by actor John Wilkes Booth.

1868 The first two Maori MPs ,  Frederick Nene Russell (Northern Maori) and Tareha Te Moananui (Eastern Maori), were elected to parliament.

First two Maori MPs elected to Parliament

1885 The first sod was turned on the North Island main trunk line.

First sod dug for North Island main trunk

1883 Stanley Bruce, eighth Prime Minister of Australia, was born.

 

1892 The General Electric Company was formed.

General Electric logo.svg

1894 Nikita Khrushchev, Premier of the Soviet Union, was born.

A portrait shot of an older, bald man with bifocal glasses. He is wearing a blazer over a collared shirt and tie. In his hands, he is holding a set of papers.

1894 Bessie Smith, American blues singer, was born.

1895 Clark McConachy, New Zealand billiards player, was born.

1906 The Armenian organization AGBU was established.

1912 Kim Il-sung, President of North Korea, was born.

1912 RMS Titanic, sinks in the North Atlantic, after hitting an iceberg two and a half hours earlier, the previous day, killing more than 1,500 people.

1916 Alfred S. Bloomingdale, American businessman, was born.

1921 Black Friday, mine owners announced a decrease in wages leading to the threat of a strike all across England

1923 Insulin became generally available for use by people with diabetes.

1924 Sir Neville Marriner, English conductor, was born.

1924 Rand McNally published its first road atlas.

Rand McNally logo.png

1930 Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, President of Iceland, was born.

1933 Elizabeth Montgomery, American actress, was born.

1940 The Allies begin their attack on the Norwegian town of Narvik which was occupied by Nazi Germany.

 

1940 Jeffrey Archer, British author, was born.

1940 Robert Lacroix, French Canadian professor of economics, was born.

1941 In the Belfast Blitz, two-hundred bombers of the German Air Force (Luftwaffe) attacked Belfast, killing 1,000 people.

 

1942 George Cross was awarded to “to the island fortress of Malta – its people and defenders” by King George VI.

 

1943 An Allied bomber attack missed the Minerva automobile factory and hits the Belgian town of Mortsel instead, killing 936 civilians.

1945 The Bergen-Belsen concentration camp was liberated.

1947 Jackie Robinson debuted for the Brooklyn Dodgers, breaking baseball’s color line.

Waist-up portrait of black batter in his mid-thirties, in Brooklyn Dodgers uniform number 42, at end of swing with bat over left shoulder, looking at where a hit ball would be

1952  The maiden flight of the B-52 Stratofortress

1955 Dodi Al-Fayed, Egyptian businessman, was born.

 

1957 White Rock, British Columbia officially separated from Surrey,  and was incorporated as a new city.

1959 Emma Thompson, English actress, was born.

1960 Prince Philippe, Duke of Brabant, heir to the Belgian throne, was born.

1979 An earthquake (of M 7.1) on Montenegro coast.

1989 A human crush occured at Hillsborough Stadium,  in the FA Cup Semi Final, resulting in the deaths of 96 Liverpool F.C. fans.

 

1989 Upon Hu Yaobang‘s death, the Tiananmen Square protests began.

1992 The National Assembly of Vietnam adopted the 1992 Constitution of the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

1994 Representatives of 124 countries and the European Communities signed the Marrakesh Agreements revising the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade and initiating the World Trade Organization (effective January 1, 1995).

2002 – An Air China Boeing 767 200, flight CA129 crashed into a hillside during heavy rain and fog near Busan, South Korea, killing 128.

Sourced from NZ History Online & WIkipedia


Top 10 songs or tunes

September 9, 2009

National Radio’s Afternoons asks listeners to come up with the best song ever written.

That’s a difficult choice to make when there are so many variables – a song or tune might be best at one time or place but beaten by another at another.

However, since we’ve had the top 10 quintessential Kiwi songs and the top 10 Beatles songs, I thought it was time for the top 10 songs from anywhere by anyone, and why:

1. The 23rd Psalm.

I remember it from Sunday school, High School. I also associate it with the big events in my life: our wedding (because me farmer like the rural connotations, at which the minister suggested we could sing We Plough the Fields and Scatter . . . ); the funerals of my mother in law, father, and both our sons and at my mother’s we sang The King of Love  which is based on the 23rd Psalm.

2. Pokarekare Ana. 

We may not know all the words, but it’s the song by which Kiwis recognise each other all over the world.

3. Pachelbel’s Canon.

I don’t remember when I first heard it but it’s been played at lots of celebrations I’ve attended. The last of these was the wedding of our nephew in Argentina when his mother, sister and cousin played it on violins as the bride entered the church.

4. Killing Me Softly.

We were skiing on Coronet Peak and had paused where the chairlift passed close to the trail. A skier reached out and waved his mitten close to my friend’s face. She immediately started singing Strumming my face with his fingers. . . ”

5. Handel’s Largo from Xerxes.

Another tune associated with celebrations, although it was several years after I first heard it that I learned it came with words.

6. The Skye Boat Song.

Partly because of my Scottish genes and partly because it was on the CD the surgeon chose when our first son was delivered.

7. Danny Boy

Our son was Dan and we sang this at his funeral. But I first came across the tune when I was in a Bible Class choir and we sang The Day Thou Gavest Lord is Ended  to it.

8. Jeremiah Clarke’s Trumpet Voluntary.

Another one associated with celebrations and we chose it for the recessional at our wedding.

9. The Great Pretender.

Any list of songs has to have a soppy one.

10. Hine E Hine

With or without the Good Night Kiwi.

11. Rock Around The Clock

A list has to have a good dance tune too.

12. When You Walk Through A Storm;  Do you Hear the People Sing;  Time to Say Goodbye;  First Time Ever; Nessun Dorma; Red, Red Wine; All My Loving, Let It Be, . . .  who said I had to stop at 10?


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