Rural round-up

May 23, 2019

We can create a future others will envy – Jacqueline Rowarth:

Jacqueline Rowarth calls on smart-thinking Kiwis to be more innovative – not only to develop New Zealand’s eco-future but also to create an environment and economy in balance.

“New Zealand is the best deliverer of prosperity in the world – the best at turning its resources and the skills of its people into prosperity.” – Legatum Global Prosperity Index, 2016

In 2016 the Legatum Global Prosperity Index ranked New Zealand No 1 of 149 countries with the words: “New Zealand is the best deliverer of prosperity in the world – the best at turning its resources and the skills of its people into prosperity.”

In 2016 we were No 1 in the economic ranks and 13th in the environment. In 2018 we were second overall, 14th in the economy and fourth in environment.

This change in rankings is indicative of the classic ‘environment versus economy’ debate. . .

The science and technology of gene-edited food:

We need to be having conversations about the challenge of feeding the world’s burgeoning population.

Fonterra COO Global Consumer & Foodservice, Judith Swales says that across the world, science and new technologies are being used to delve into the viability and practicality of lab based and gene edited food. Gene-edited oil is being sold commercially for the first time in the United States and the first burger with a lab grown ‘meat’ patty due to go on sale in the UK.

The United Nations has estimated the world population at around 8 billion and expects it to be close to 10 billion by 2050 and more than 11 billion in 2100. Dairy is a great source of nutrition and has a key role in meeting this challenge though its expected complementary sources of protein will be needed. . . 

‘Compelling’ Nicola Blowey scoops four national dairy awards – Gerard Hutching:

Fairlie assistant herd manager Nicola Blowey has an abundance of ambition and confidence.

Recently awarded the prize of 2019 New Zealand dairy trainee of the year, the 25-year-old wants to own her own herd and eventually her own farm.

“I’m working towards my own herd and in future I’d like to have an interest in several dairy farming businesses so I can create progression to help other young people.”

They are the sort of high-reaching goals that resonate with Leonie and Kieran Guiney, owners of the 600-cow, 175 hectare property where Blowey works. . .

National Lamb Day

On February 15 in 1882, William Davidson and Thomas Brydone achieved the remarkable, by launching the first shipment of frozen sheep meat from Port Chalmers in Otago on the Dunedin, bound for London. 

The 5,000 carcasses arrived in London, 98 days later on 24th May, in excellent condition which was no easy feat back in those days and goes without saying not without incident. Prior to this, New Zealand mainly sold wool overseas as no-one believed it possible to have a thriving meat export business. Yet we are now looking at a $8.5 billion sheep and beef export industry.  . .

 

How wool is solving your sustainable fashion dilemma one fibre at a time :

Wool Week is upon us and if you’re not familiar with what that means and why we should be celebrating wool, then listen up.

Merino wool is Australia’s biggest fashion export, which is cause for celebration in itself, but it’s also 100 per cent natural, renewable and biodegradable. This year, Wool Week is backed by David Jones, with Australian model Jessica Gomes fronting the campaign.

Here at Vogue, we’re all about championing sustainable and circular fashion, which is why we’ve pulled together five reasons you should be celebrating wool not only this week, but every week. . . 

 

Matt McRae: Southland/Otago’s Young Farmer of the Year finalist:

Southland sheep and beef farmer Matt McRae is preparing to compete in this year’s FMG Young Farmer of the Year Grand Final in Hawke’s Bay. It will be his last shot at taking out the prestigious title.

Matt McRae is one of the driving forces behind a family-owned agribusiness in Southland which is in expansion mode.

The addition of a new 320 hectare lease block in April, has enabled significant growth in sheep and cattle numbers.  . .


We’re loving wool

May 26, 2014

It’s Wool Week and we’re loving it:

Proud declarations of “We’re Loving Wool!” will be heard around the country during New Zealand’s Wool Week from May 26 to June 2, 2014. Wool Week hopes to promote the wonders of wool and The Campaign for Wool’s work in New Zealand.

‘Wool Windows’ will be unveiled from over thirty-five designers and retailers, led by Zambesi Fashion. As CFW ‘Wool in Fashion’ Ambassador since 2011, Liz Finlay’s support is a huge asset to New Zealand’s wool industry.

Throughout May, Billboards and buses will exhibit a wool family proudly wearing New Zealand designed woollen clothing. Campaign for Wool social media will buzz with wool facts and New Zealanders will be encouraged to join the conversation and share reasons why they choose wool.

Supporters around the country have been invited to join the festivities at the Wool Week headquarters situated in Britomart, Auckland. Participants will have the chance to view wool art installations and even a live sheep show by a master sheep handler on Saturday, June 1st.

Wool Week 2014 is run by one of Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust’s brand partners, Primary Wool Co-operative. “Our goal is to raise the profile of the fibre and raise the profile of the work being done by The Campaign for Wool in New Zealand,” says Bay De Lautour, chairman of Primary Wool Co-operative.

HRH The Prince of Wales inspired The Campaign for Wool in 2010 to promote wool’s myriad of different uses. As a nation founded on sheep farming, New Zealand’s decision to support the Campaign was easy. It proudly stands alongside the UK and Australia as a founding member country.

“With the Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust (CFWNZT) now set up as a new independent entity, our focus is two-fold – working closely with brand partners in their efforts to drive consumer demand for wool and ensuring New Zealand wool is part of the sustainable high-end global story,” says Philippa Wright, Chair, CFWNZT.

“With PWC investing in the “I’m Loving Wool” week-long campaign and PGG Wrightson owning the “Wool in Schools” project, we are really starting to see the results of HRH The Prince of Wales’ intention to get the industry working together – collaborating on the generic messaging and competing for market share once demand has been driven up, she says.

“Globally, the US is CFW’s market of opportunity. New Zealand Strong wool makes up 80% of all wool used in the US while only 4% of all fibre used in the US is wool. If we can increase demand by a mere 2%, there would not be enough wool presently produced in the world to supply this demand.

“Globally, the opportunity for wool, which is on the cusp of hitting its stride, is exciting and New Zealand wool needs to be a lead player in this market, says Ms Wright.

 

Proud declarations of “We’re Loving Wool!” will be heard around the country during New Zealand’s Wool Week from May 26 to June 2, 2014. Wool Week hopes to promote the wonders of wool and The Campaign for Wool’s work in New Zealand.

‘Wool Windows’ will be unveiled from over thirty-five designers and retailers, led by Zambesi Fashion. As CFW ‘Wool in Fashion’ Ambassador since 2011, Liz Finlay’s support is a huge asset to New Zealand’s wool industry.

Throughout May, Billboards and buses will exhibit a wool family proudly wearing New Zealand designed woollen clothing. Campaign for Wool social media will buzz with wool facts and New Zealanders will be encouraged to join the conversation and share reasons why they choose wool.

Supporters around the country have been invited to join the festivities at the Wool Week headquarters situated in Britomart, Auckland. Participants will have the chance to view wool art installations and even a live sheep show by a master sheep handler on Saturday, June 1st.

Wool Week 2014 is run by one of Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust’s brand partners, Primary Wool Co-operative. “Our goal is to raise the profile of the fibre and raise the profile of the work being done by The Campaign for Wool in New Zealand,” says Bay De Lautour, chairman of Primary Wool Co-operative.

HRH The Prince of Wales inspired The Campaign for Wool in 2010 to promote wool’s myriad of different uses. As a nation founded on sheep farming, New Zealand’s decision to support the Campaign was easy. It proudly stands alongside the UK and Australia as a founding member country.

“With the Campaign for Wool New Zealand Trust (CFWNZT) now set up as a new independent entity, our focus is two-fold – working closely with brand partners in their efforts to drive consumer demand for wool and ensuring New Zealand wool is part of the sustainable high-end global story,” says Philippa Wright, Chair, CFWNZT.

“With PWC investing in the “I’m Loving Wool” week-long campaign and PGG Wrightson owning the “Wool in Schools” project, we are really starting to see the results of HRH The Prince of Wales’ intention to get the industry working together – collaborating on the generic messaging and competing for market share once demand has been driven up, she says.

“Globally, the US is CFW’s market of opportunity. New Zealand Strong wool makes up 80% of all wool used in the US while only 4% of all fibre used in the US is wool. If we can increase demand by a mere 2%, there would not be enough wool presently produced in the world to supply this demand.

“Globally, the opportunity for wool, which is on the cusp of hitting its stride, is exciting and New Zealand wool needs to be a lead player in this market, says Ms Wright.

– See more at: http://www.campaignforwool.org/news-item/clamours-of-were-loving-wool-set-to-ripple-around-new-zealand/#sthash.Yximo2b3.dpuf

Clamours of “We’re Loving Wool!” set to ripple around New Zealand  http://www.campaignforwool.org/news-item/clamours-of-were-loving-wool-set-to-ripple-around-new-zealand/


Rural round-up

May 19, 2014

Lake Tekapo not feasible as source of irrigation:

More than $90,000 has been spent on a study showing that taking water from Lake Tekapo for irrigation would be too expensive to be viable.

The 150-page report, released by Environment Canterbury yesterday, examined the economics of transferring water for irrigation from Lake Tekapo, via Burkes Pass to farmland nearer the coast.

The report examined two concepts: a two-cumec (cubic metre per second) year-round transfer to support 11,550 hectares of irrigated land and a 10-cumec seasonal transfer for 25,000ha of irrigated land.

Both proved to be financially unviable, with the second proposal potentially costing between $478 million and $691m to build, with a negative cost-benefit of $1857 per hectare on the scheme.

ECan deputy commissioner David Caygill said the report only examined economic factors. . .

Federated Farmers welcomes return to surplus:

Federated Farmers welcomes the confirmation in today’s Budget of a return to surplus.

“The projected surplus for 2014/15 might be small but if achieved it will be a great milestone resulting from a lot of hard work,” said Federated Farmers’ President Bruce Willis.

“The achievement of a surplus should not be underestimated given the impact firstly of the Global Financial Crisis and then the devastating Canterbury Earthquakes.

“Most importantly for our economy, is to have a surplus combined with continued spending restraint to take the pressure off monetary policy and therefore interest rates and the New Zealand Dollar.

“A surplus also gives us some real choices for the first time in several years, choices which our friends across the Tasman would love to have in the wake of their own Budget.  . . .

Fonterra cleans up at Dairy Industry Association of Australia Awards:

Fonterra Australia has taken home 61 awards from the 2014 Dairy Industry Association of Australia (DIAA) Australian Dairy Product Awards.

Adding to its award collection, Fonterra Australia picked up 12 gold awards for products including Riverina Fresh milk, made in Wagga Wagga; its Tamar Valley no added sugar yoghurt and mild cheddar, made in Stanhope.

Fonterra Operations Manager Chris Diaz said the awards confirm the high-quality of Fonterra products made across our 10 manufacturing facilities. . .

Using beef semen in dairy herds – everyone wins:

The Beef + Lamb New Zealand (B+LNZ) funded Dairy Beef Integration programme is looking at the impact of using quality beef genetics in a dairy-beef supply chain. The work is supported by LIC and Ezicalve Hereford – which, as the name suggests, is a brand name for Herefords that have been selected for ease of calving.

Led by Dr Vicki Burggraaf, the five-year project is now in its third year. “Seventy percent of New Zealand’s beef kill comes from the dairy industry, yet there is limited use of proven beef genetics on dairy farms – despite the fact these genetics have the potential to increase calving ease and produce better animals for beef production.”

Dairy farmers have traditionally shied away from using beef semen, with many believing it would result in more calving problems, compared to using dairy semen. “This project is investigating how accurate this belief is,” Dr Burggraaf says.

“It aims to demonstrate to both dairy farmers and beef farmers that using beef semen with high estimated breeding values for calving ease and growth rates will benefit everyone.” . . .

Australia wool week:

Where better to celebrate wool than in the country synonymous with the world’s finest wool for apparel – Australia. And it wasn’t only fashion retailers which united in the name of this naturally inspiring fibre, interior textile brands also banded together to promote the natural, renewable and biodegradable fibre, all singing to the tune ‘Live naturally, Choose wool’.

Previous years have seen Australia celebrate Wool Week against the backdrop of Sydney’s iconic Harbour Bridge and Opera House. This year, celebrations shifted south to Melbourne – another one of Australia’s great cities which is surrounded by prominent woolgrowing properties and an area with strong links to Australia’s wool industry. . .

How to manufacture consent in the Bay of Plenty – Jamie Ball:

Many of the repeated claims by a kiwifruit industry leader about the post-deregulation apple industry “disaster” are wrong and may be giving the kiwifruit industry false hope.

The more recent allegations, made by NZ Kiwifruit Growers Inc (NZKGI) president Neil Trebilco last month and this month to support his case (opposition to deregulation of the kiwifruit industry), used figures on the apple industry that have now been rejected by Pipfruit NZ, Horticultural NZ, Plant & Food Research and Statistics NZ as either nonexistent or wrong.

Although NZKGI is the mandated grower body claiming to represent 2700 kiwifruit growers and is the self-declared “Zespri watchdog,” its primary objective is to protect the single point of entry (Zespri). . .


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