Rural round-up

October 30, 2018

Italian connection links North Otago with high fashion – Sally Rae:

Italian textile company Reda Group hosted an annual conference for its New Zealand wool growers at Rippon Vineyard, Wanaka, last week. Sally Rae was invited to
attend.

Reda Group is in the enviable position of having first-hand knowledge of the entire production chain – from the fleece to the finished fabric.

The Italian textile company, owned by the Botto Poala family, owns 30,000ha in the Waitaki Valley and the Mackenzie, farming merino sheep on Rugged Ridges, Otamatapaio and Glenrock stations. 

That meant the company knew the problems and challenges that their grower suppliers were encountering. . . 

Central Otago family recognised for excellence of their wool – Sally Rae:

The Jones family, from Matarae Station, have been recognised for the hard work and effort that goes into producing their high quality merino wool.

Willie and Emily Jones, along with Mr Jones’ mother Juliet, who classes their wool, were presented with Reda Group’s Marque of Excellence 2017-18 – or top supplier – at a function in Wanaka last week.

Elliott and Nikki Heckler, from Olrig Station, near Galloway, were second and Bevan and Tiffany McKnight (Merino Ridges), in the Ida Valley, were third.

Mr Jones was delighted to receive the award, which included a trip to Italy. . . 

 

Electricity key to Fonterra’s 2050 net zero target – Gavin Evans:

 (BusinessDesk) – Electricity is probably Fonterra’s best long-term energy option, but the company says it will need a combination of fuels at its sites as it works toward its 2050 net zero emissions target.

New Zealand’s biggest exporter operates 30 plants nationally and is a major user of gas and coal for its milk powder drying.

It expects to start running its Brightwater plant near Nelson on a mix of coal and wood chip next month. In August it announced plans to convert the boiler fuel at its cheese plant at Stirling – south-east of Balclutha – from coal to electricity. . . 

Ground spreaders take biosecurity risk-prevention seriously:

The New Zealand Groundspread Fertilisers Association (NZGFA) has developed a set of bio-security guidelines to prevent the spread of weed and pest diseases between farms. The biosecurity protocol gives both farmers and ground spreaders sound practical advice to minimise the risk of spreading any unwanted seeds or bacterial disease on fertiliser spreaders.

While the outbreak of the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis has raised general awareness of on farm biosecurity, the fertiliser groundspread industry has long been aware of spreader truck hygiene between farms. M.bovis is the latest biosecurity incursion but is less likely to be transferred from farm to farm than weeds like Velvet Leaf or Chilean Needle Grass. . . 

Here come the Sharp Blacks: NZ butchery team announced:

New Zealand’s butchery team – The Sharp Blacks – has been announced as they kick off their journey to the 2020 World Butchers’ Challenge (WBC) in Sacramento, California. The seven-man team, which includes one reserve, is made up of the best butchers from across the country and preparation will now start in earnest as they plan for the ‘Olympics of Butchery’ in September 2020.

The Sharp Blacks squad is made up of the following members;
• Corey Winder (Team Captain, Product Developer) – Elite Meats Bush Inn, Christchurch
• Jeremy Garth (Product Developer) – New World Ferry Road, Christchurch
• David Timbs (Product Developer) – Peter Timbs Meats, Christchurch
• Riki Kerekere (Breaking & Boning) – Countdown Meat & Seafood, Auckland
• Reuben Sharples (Breaking & Boning) – Aussie Butcher New Lynn, Auckland
• James Smith (Garnishing & Display) – PAK’nSAVE Pukekohe, Auckland
• Luka Young (reserve) – New World Eastridge, Auckland . . 

Northern Hemisphere kiwifruit harvest well underway for Zespri:

The harvest of Zespri Kiwifruit from Northern Hemisphere orchards is well underway, with total volumes expected to reach more than 19 million trays this season.

Zespri Chief International Production Officer Sheila McCann-Morrison says the increased volumes demonstrate the progress being made on Zespri’s global supply strategy of providing consumers with Zespri Kiwifruit for all twelve months of the year. . . 

Hamilton to host 2019 Champion of Cheese awards:

Waikato – long recognised as the country’s dairy capital – will host The New Zealand Specialist Cheesemakers Association (NZSCA) NZ Champions of Cheese Awards in May 2019.

The Specialist Cheesemakers Association has been running the awards since 2003 and will host the 16th annual NZSCA Gala Awards Evening at the Distinction Hamilton Hotel and Conference Centre on Tuesday 21 May 2019. The awards ceremony will be preceded by the association’s AGM and followed the next day with a cheesemakers seminar all hosted at Distinction Hamilton Hotel and Conference Centre. It’s the first time the awards ceremony has been hosted out of Auckland. . . 

 


Rural round-up

July 13, 2017

Oritain, GE Healthcare form serum testing partnership – Sally Rae:

Oritain has partnered with global medical technology giant GE Healthcare to run a test-based traceability programme to authenticate country of origin of foetal bovine serum (FBS), used in human and animal health vaccines.

Since its establishment in 2008, the Mosgiel-based company has been a global leader in using forensic science to determine product provenance.

Operations director Dr Sam Lind described the partnership as ”very significant”, not only cementing the work the company was doing within that industry, but also the opportunity to work with such a global company. . .

Productivity and quality pay off for Matarae – Sally Rae:

At Matarae Station, Willie and Emily Jones have a strong focus on development and production.

The couple, with young sons Archie and Digby, lease the 5500ha Strath Taieri property from Mr Jones’ parents, Ron and Juliet, but own the stock.

They said they were running both merino and Romney sheep under ‘‘pretty extreme’’ conditions that could range from a metre of snow to very wet, or as dry as the typical Central Otago climate.

The property was running about 5700 merino ewes, 3800 Romney ewes, 3500 merino hoggets and 1800 Romney and halfbred hoggets, plus lambs, mixed-age rams and about 200 breeding cows. . .

Precision farming the new reality

Craige MacKenzie has seen a lot of technological change since 1978, when he started farming the property he grew up on near Methven.

“The changes haven’t just been in the tools we can use, but also in the industry-wide focus on precision farming, which is all about using IT to ensure crops and soil receive exactly what they need for optimum health and productivity. We’ve tried to take it to a new level.”

Craige and his wife Roz turned a traditional mixed cropping farm into a dairy farm and a specialised seed production operation in 1987.

He has won numerous awards for outstanding farming practice, including: . .

The 25 most innovative at-tech startups – Maggie McGrath and Chloe Sorvino:

When our nation was founded 241 years ago, farming was the economy’s primary driver. By 1870, nearly half of the employed population held jobs in agriculture. Today, it’s a $3 trillion industry – but only 2% of Americans hold a farm-oriented job.

This is, in many ways, thanks to technology. Tractors and other automation advances in the 20th century let large farms shift management to only a handful of people. But this, paradoxically, has also slowed things down in the 21st. With only a few people working every farm, there’s not a lot of time – or incentive – to innovate.

“You only get 40 attempts at farming. From your 20’s to your 60’s, you get 40 seasons,” says Duncan Logan, the founder and CEO of RocketSpace, a tech accelerator company. “In tech, you get 40 attempts in a week.” . . 

Fonterra Announces General Manager, Māori Strategy – Tiaki Hunia:

Fonterra today announced the appointment of Tiaki Hunia to the role of General Manager, Māori Strategy/Pouhere Māori.

As Pouhere Māori, Tiaki will play a vital role in continuing to progress our strategic Māori commitments and strengthen Fonterra’s bicultural capability. He will work across the business, to lead, build and implement our vision of a strong partnership with Māori, growing prosperous, healthy and sustainable communities together. . .

Tractor and machinery industry calls for larger fines for intentional biosecurity breaches:

The Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) is praising the Ministry of Primary Industry for finding a contaminated combine harvester imported from the UK but says fines must be a deterrent for intentional biosecurity breaches.

Last week Christchurch company Gateway Cargo Systems Ltd was fined $3,000 by the Ministry of Primary Industries after it declared a contaminated combine harvester imported from the United Kingdom was brand new. An inspection by MPI at the border found it had been used and was heavily contaminated with more than 700 litres of soil and farm waste in the header unit. MPI said it could have caused “incalculable damage” to New Zealand’s environment. . .

 


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