Rural round-up

December 21, 2015

Peterson Farm Bros's photo.

Proactive approach succeeds – Sally Rae:

When it comes to grappling with water-quality issues, Madeline Hall has a suggestion for farmers.

They need to take a pro-active role to think about rules coming in and ask themselves how they could be involved to help make it work, Ms Hall, an environmental sociology masters student at the University of Otago’s Centre for Sustainability, said.

Ms Hall has researched the social impact of a nutrient-reduction nitrogen-trading scheme on farming communities in the Lake Taupo basin. The innovative market-based environmental policy was established to address growing community concern about water quality. . . .

‘Fearless leadership’ urged – Sally Rae:

When Dutch couple Helen and Art Blom came to New Zealand in the mid-1990s, it was to be only a temporary stint.

The couple, who had studied agriculture at university in Holland, intended to work on a farm for a year.

But they ended up ‘‘staying forever”, Mrs Blom, who recently graduated from the Agri-Women’s Development Trust’s 2015 Escalator programme, says, laughing. . . 

Summer vigil for biosecurity staff:

The latest border biosecurity boost will help the Ministry for Primary Industries manage a swarm of new international flights and passengers this summer.

Last week, 57 new biosecurity staff, including 24 detector dog teams, graduated from their training at a ceremony in Auckland.

MPI and other border agencies are gearing for the busiest summer ever, says Steve Gilbert, MPI’s Border Clearance Director. . . 

Pest control firm praises ‘exemplary’ 1080 investigation:

Animal Control Products (ACP), the State-Owned Enterprise that imports 1080 and manufactures 1080 bait products for pest control in New Zealand, today congratulated the Police on arresting and charging the blackmailer who threatened to contaminate infant formula with 1080 poison.

Chief executive William McCook said ACP was pleased to have been able to assist the Police with their investigation, in particular with some of the technical and historical aspects of their investigation.

He said the Police had done an exemplary job in tracking down and bringing the blackmailer to justice, and that the Ministry for Primary Industries’ (MPI) approach to protecting consumers and ensuring infant formula was safe was well-coordinated. . .

Upgraded Hooker Valley track opens:

A newly completed upgrade of Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park’s popular Hooker Valley track makes it easier for visitors to experience the spectacle of New Zealand’s highest mountains, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.
Ms Barry officially opened the improved track at a ceremony outside Mt Cook Village today.

The $1.7 million project means the track is less prone to flooding, avoids potential avalanche and rockfall areas and is more accessible for walkers. . .

AgriFoodNZ Setting Up To Invest in New Zealand’s Food & Beverage Sector

Signs Memorandum of Understanding with Bank of China NZ

The Bank of China (NZ) and AgriFoodNZ have today announced that they have signed a Memorandum of Understanding to help New Zealand food and beverage companies seeking to gain access to investment capital and expertise in marketing and distributing product and services in China.

AgriFoodNZ (Food & Agricultural Trading New Zealand Limited) was recently formed to facilitate investment and enhance the marketing and distribution capability of New Zealand food and beverage products.

Macri ditches wheat, corn, beef export taxes:

The [Argentinean] national government has finally announced one of its pledges during the campaign: the total removal of export taxes for regional economies and a cut of the soy bean export tax by 5%.

Soy bean export taxes will be reduced from 35 percent to 30 percent while corn, wheat and meat export taxes will be totally removed.

“The day has come and I had asked you to hold on,” Macri said during a speech delivered in the Buenos Aires city of Pergamino where he made the announcement, escorted by Buenos Aires governor María Eugenia Vidal, Agricultural Minister Ricardo Buryaile, Interior Minister Rogelio Frigeroi and Let’s Change Senators Carlos Reutemann and Alfredo de Angeli, among other officials.

He called to “launch a new phase together” adding “without the agricultural sector the country won’t move forward.” . . .

Student has made $40,000 profit selling baby formula to buyers in China – and says he is doing nothing wrong ‘because every child deserves access to the food’ –  Liam Quinn:

A student has revealed how he made more than $40,000 selling baby formula to China.

The young student, who did not reveal where he lives in Australia, said he got into the lucrative market after a Chinese friend returned to the country late in 2014.

Just weeks later, he was selling his first can and making a measly $1.50 profit, but it was the start of a huge pay-day. . .


Rural round-up

January 27, 2015

Race to control Canterbury fire – Thomas Mead:

Rural fire crews are considering all possible options as a massive scrub fire burns through a high-country station in Canterbury and temperatures creep up.

Three planes, six helicopters and around 20 firefighters are battling a raging blaze on the hillside at Flock Hill Station, near State Highway 73 and on the way to Arthur’s Pass.

The fire started around 2:30pm yesterday and grew from 10 hectares to 333 hectares overnight, burning through a thick growth of wilding pine, manuka scrub and tussock. The area is equivalent to around 300 rugby fields or three-quarters of the Auckland Central Business District. . .

If farmers hurt, the nation hurts – Bryan Gibson:

Last week, while navigating the cat pictures and uplifting life affirmations of Facebook, I came across a post about the drought-like conditions. The writer stated there seemed to be a fair number of farmers complaining about the weather in the media.

His reasoned the weather was simply a factor of farming business and so farmers should just live with whatever rain or shine the heavens provided.

I sense this is a common belief of many people not associated with farming. . .

McCook hangs up his pest sword – Richard Rennie:

The nemesis for millions of possums is stepping down from his post as king of eradication but his furred foe can be assured there will be little respite on his departure.

OSPRI chief executive William McCook is leaving his post after 12 years heading OSPRI since 2013 and its predecessor the Animal Health Board (AHB). He has decided it’s time for something new but wants to keep his links with the primary sector. . .

Sheep and vineyards a winning combination  – Sally Rae:

Timbo Deaker and Jason Thomson might know a thing or two about grapes but they admit they are ”totally green” when it comes to sheep.

So it comes as something of a surprise that the pair, who operate Viticultura, a Central Otago-based business that manages vineyards and provides brokerage, consultancy and contracting services, supply lambs to Alliance Group.

Historically, they have given winter grazing to local farmers, but for the past two years they have bought their own sheep to fatten beneath the vines. . .

Golden run for NZ shearing legend:

New Zealand shearing legend David Fagan is on a winning streak in what might be his final season on the competition shearing circuit.

He won the Geyserland Shears Open Final at the Rotorua A&P Show during the weekend – the twelfth time he had won that particular event. . .

Equine industry joins GIA biosecurity agreement:

Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy has welcomed a fourth primary industry to the GIA partnership today.

The New Zealand Equine Health Association has signed the Deed of the Government Industry Agreement (GIA) for Biosecurity Readiness and Response at the Karaka yearling sales today.

“This means the horse racing, recreational and breeding industry and the Ministry for Primary Industries can work together to manage and respond to the most important biosecurity risks. . .

Double delight for Cambridge Stud early on Day One at Karaka:

The undoubted quality of the famous Cambridge Stud bloodlines were to the fore again at Karaka as the Stud enjoyed a high-priced double strike during the early stages of this year’s premier session at the New Zealand Bloodstock National Yearling sale series.

The Cambridge draft provided Lot 36, a bay filly from the first crop of resident stallion Cape Blanco out of the Danehill mare Love Diamonds. The mare is a daughter of blueblood producer Tristalove with this filly’s extended pedigree on the catalogue page reading like a who’s who of Australasian racing. . .

 

Doors open at Rabobank Dargaville

Rabobank will open its newest office in New Zealand next Monday February 2, 2015 located in the Northland township of Dargaville.

Nestled in the heart of Dargaville, the new Rabobank branch will be located at 92 Normanby Street.

Rabobank Northland branch manager Tessa Sutherland said the office is convenient and centrally-located, allowing for clients to easily access the branch.

“It has been a vision for quite some time now and we are thrilled to be opening our new branch in Dargaville next week, starting off 2015 with a bang,” Ms Sutherland said. . .

 


Rural round-up

November 26, 2012

New Zealand urged to protect its brand – Sally Rae:

For an export nation like New Zealand, being “clean and green” is not enough any more, Oritain Global chief executive Dr Helen Darling says.

‘We actually need to be clean, green and clever,” Dr Darling said yesterday, while referring to the increasing instances of global food fraud.

Food fraud was an emerging risk for both consumers and producers worldwide, with the OECD estimating it cost legitimate producers about $US250 billion every year and that figure was growing, she said. . .

Local water focus urged – Howard Keene:

This month’s release of the third and final Land and Water Forum report marks a new consensus-driven approach to reform laws and practices around freshwater management in New Zealand, but its success will depend on how much the three reports the Government is willing to adopt.

The report recommends that local communities make decisions on individual catchments, acting within a national framework and bottom lines set by the Government. It also says water should be made more easily transferable between users.

While the report has received a mostly positive response there have been some cautioning voices. . .

Sweet smelling possums may help eradicate TB:

Using sex pheromones to capture possums is one example of the cutting-edge TB control initiatives featured in this year’s Animal Health Board (AHB) annual report and research report.

A two-year study into using sexually receptive female possums as a way to capture possums of both sexes in areas where numbers are low is among the scientific work forming part of the $2.5 million annually allocated by the AHB to research.

AHB chief executive William McCook said the two reports show the continuing significant progress being made in controlling and eradicating bovine TB from New Zealand, with the support of a range of government and industry partners. . .

Landcorp goal 80% fixed price sales – Alan Williams:

Landcorp sold more than 70% of its export lambs under fixed price contracts in its latest year, as part of a longer term goal to have 80% of all red meat sales handled this way.

This makes more than 230,000 lambs on fixed contracts out of a total 330,000 sent to processing companies in the year ended June 30 by the state-owned farmer.

Prices were on average higher than those achieved on traditional schedules, Landcorp livestock marketing manager Andrew Hall said in the written annual report.

About half the fixed price lamb contracts were for supply to the United Kingdom’s biggest grocery chain Tesco, he later told The New Zealand Farmers Weekly. . .

Rabobank Report: A New Wine Frontier:

With maturing or declining sales in many traditional markets, wine companies across the globe are increasingly searching for new growth markets. Emerging markets are attracting the interest of nearly all major wine companies. But those companies that were late to invest in these markets often have a greater challenge as the competition has already established routes to market and has garnered share of mind with the consumer. While China and South Korea probably rank as the most attractive emerging wine markets, Rabobank has identified Mexico, Brazil, Poland and Nigeria as four ‘hidden gems’ that have the potential to become important growth markets. Early investments to establish a route to market and build brand awareness hold the key to long term growth in these markets. . . 

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