Rural round-up

25/08/2021

Labour must stop flooding rural NZ with pointless and onderous regulations :

Labour’s latest regulatory hurdle for rural water schemes shows it is deeply out of touch with provincial New Zealand, National’s Rural Communities spokesperson Barbara Kuriger and Local Government spokesperson Christopher Luxon say.

“As it stands, the Water Services Bill would expose tens of thousands of rural water schemes to disproportionate bureaucracy, just so they can continue supplying water between, for example, a farmhouse, a dairy shed and workers’ quarters,” Mr Luxon says.

“Despite warnings from National and major sector bodies at select committee, the bill will require Taumata Arowai to track down and register around 70,000 farm supply arrangements, each of which will need to write safety and risk management plans.

“We’re deeply concerned that the compliance costs and administrative burden this will create for farmers will be significant, while any supposed safety gains will be tiny. . . 

Shearing industry faces added challenges at busiest time of year – Chris Tobin:

The pressure is on the shearing industry as contractors juggle the usual challenges of inclement weather with the added restrictions of level 4 lockdown which has fallen at their busiest time of year..

South Canterbury Federated Farmers president and meat and wool chairman, Greg Anderson, said under level 4 restrictions which include social distancing and mask wearing, shearing was taking longer to complete with daily tallies down on usual numbers.

Anderson said there was now pressure to get pre-lamb shearing done.

“The time frame depends on when lambing begins, if it is in early September, the shearing will have to be done in the next week or so,” Anderson said. . . 

Should people really be thanking farmers for their morning latte? – Craig Hickman:

Like many silly ideas, the Thank a Farmer hashtag that has been popping up all over social media and which even made an appearance at the recent farmer protest can trace its origins back to the United States.

It was a silly sentiment when it originated there in the 1800s, and it hasn’t improved in the intervening 300-odd years.

I recently objected to the concept in reply to a social media post where a local young dairy farmer was berating his audience for not being more appreciative for the milk in their Sunday morning coffee while he was at work on the farm.

I was confused. My milk goes to the Clandeboye factory, where it is processed into either milk powder or mozzarella. Do I deserve thanks from the Sunday morning coffee sippers or is that reserved for the farmers who produce the 5 per cent of dairy product that isn’t exported? .  .

Yili and Westland “Cream Team’ create new product for China:

A cross-cultural research and development project has succeeded in harnessing the natural grass-fed goodness of milk from New Zealand’s remote West Coast into a product suitable for discerning Chinese bakers.

The product, Yili Pro UHT Whipping Cream, will be available to Chinese consumers this October.

Resident Director for Yili in New Zealand, Shiqing Jian, said the two-year collaboration between Westland Dairy Company Limited and parent company Yili had managed to overcome the inherent variability of grass-fed milk to produce cream with a consistency suitable for Chinese bakers.

Mr Jian said Yili’s growth as an international brand relied strongly on innovation and longstanding research and development investment. New product sales accounted for 16 per cent of Yili’s total revenue in 2020 with Yili now ranked the fifth largest dairy producer globally. . . 

Whittakers goes nuts for Canterbury with its new artisan block:

Whittaker’s has released its new Artisan Collection Canterbury Hazelnut in Creamy Milk Chocolate 100g block. Whittaker’s Artisan Collection celebrates New Zealand’s finest home-grown ingredients, and this is the first flavour that features premium produce sourced from the Canterbury region.

Whittaker’s Chocolate Lovers with a keen eye may have already spotted the block at their local supermarket. It is available now in stores nationwide and via online shopping and there is plenty to go around, so Whittaker’s Chocolate Lovers are encouraged to wait until their next planned supermarket shop to pick up a block.

Whittaker’s Canterbury Hazelnut in Creamy Milk Chocolate combines roasted Canterbury hazelnut pieces, sourced from Canterbury hazelnut co-operative Hazelz, with a silky smooth hazelnut paste and Whittaker’s 33% cocoa Creamy Milk Chocolate. . .

Country diary: the ups and downs of buying a retired shepherd’s flock – Andrea Meanwell:

I haven’t been to Ingleton since the 1980s, but the rocky landscape still inspires as much awe and wonder in me now as it did when I was a girl. We would come here on school trips to crawl into a cave or abseil down a pothole, but this time I’m here to discuss buying sheep from a retiring shepherd.

It is a difficult thing to retire and sell a flock of sheep, and it’s a difficult thing to buy one. I felt guilty for buying all of them, not some. And it brings to mind your own limited time as guardian of your farm. What will happen when I can no longer walk the length of the farm to gather sheep? Will I retire, or simply carry on doing what I can? Is the only realistic exit strategy death?

My mind is brought back down to earth as we arrive at the gate. I thrust my cash into my pocket and jump out of the car ready to look at the sheep. This will not be an easy conversation. How do you buy someone’s life’s work, their legacy? . . .


Cocaine, cannabis and chocolate don’t mix

09/12/2013

Whittakers has not yet made a decision on whether it will use Nigella Lawson in advertising campaigns.

British celebrity chef Nigella Lawson 53, admitted at a London court this week to twice using cocaine and occasionally cannabis, but dismissed claims she was a drug addict. . .

“Whittaker’s has had a fantastically successful year this year,” chief marketing officer Philip Poole said.

“We have been voted New Zealand’s Most Trusted Brand with Reader’s Digest and the Colmar Brunton [top New Zealand brand] … we also got voted the Fair Trade Most Popular Brand …

“Nigella has obviously been part of our marketing campaign this year and we’ll sit down at the beginning of next year and review what we’ve achieved this year and see what our marketing objectives are next year and review everything then.” . . .

Cocaine, cannabis and chocolate aren’t a good mix.

Someone who uses drugs even if it was only twice and occasionally, is not a good face for a trusted brand, nor is she an appropriate role model for its consumers, many of whom will be children.


It worked

15/07/2013

An incident involving a Whittaker’s van crashing into Paeroa’s L&P bottle was a marketing stunt by Coca-Cola.

If the aim was publicity, it worked.

 

Chocolate’s always a winner

23/07/2012

We’ve been coming and going a lot this month and enjoying the wee Whittaker’s chocolate bar Air New Zealand offers passengers as a snack.

The choice is usually vege crisps, and Anzac biscuit or the chocolate and from my observations chocolate is by far the most popular choice.

That’s no doubt good for the company and Whittaker’s has another reason to celebrate – it’s been named Readers Digest’s most trusted brand.

Hello Chocolate Lovers. We are proud to announce that we have been voted by Reader's Digest as New Zealand’s Most Trusted Brand for 2012. Thanks for all your support and we hope you continue to enjoy our delicious chocolate :)

Porirua based chocolate maker Whittaker’s has been voted New Zealand’s most trusted brand in the annual Reader’s Digest Most Trusted Survey; released today in the August issue of Reader’s Digest New Zealand.

Whittaker’s moved up three places to top the 2012 list, knocking last year’s number one, St John’s, to number two. Iconic cooking and baking goods brand Edmonds made an impressive debut at number three, while Dettol fell from two to eight. . .

The top 10 for most trusted brands (with last year’s place in brackets) were:

1) Whittaker’s (3)
2) St John (1)
3) Edmonds (n/a)
4) Wattie’s (4)
5) Sanitarium (8)
6) Tip Top (bread) (5)
7) Lemon & Paeroa (L&P) (10)
8) Dettol (2)
9) Toyota (9)
10) Colgate (7)

Category winners were:

Category Winner Highly Commended
NZ Iconic Brands Watties Whittakers
Banks KiwiBank ASB
Breakfast Food Sanitarium Kellogg’s
Car Brands Toyota Ford
Cleaning Products Dettol Jif
Confectionery Whittaker’s Nestle
DIY Power Tools Stihl Black & Decker
Dry Foods Sanitarium Tip Top
Electronics Sony Panasonic
Fast Food Subway McDonalds
Frozen Food Watties Bird’s Eye
Gardening Equipment Masport Stihl
Home Improvement Stores Mitre 10 Bunnings
Hotel/Motel Accommodation Copthorne Millennium
Insurance Providers AA Insurance Southern Cross
Kitchen Appliances Breville Kenwood
Packaged Foods Watties Sanitarium
Pain Relief Panadol Nurofen
Paint Brands Resene Dulux
Pet Food Brands Whiskas Purina One
Retail Brands Farmers NZ Post
Supermarket Brands Countdown PaknSave
Toiletries& Cosmetics Colgate Dove
Vitamins & Supplements Healtheries Blackmores
Whitegoods Fisher & Paykel Samsung

Alert readers will note that although these have been judged New Zealand’s most trusted brands it means brands trusted by New Zealanders rather than New Zealand brands. Only some are local companies.


Chocolate wars

11/07/2009

When the wind was in the right direction the smell from the near by chocolate factory wafted over the Otago University campus.

That memory provided a foundation for my preference for Cadbury’s chocolate.

But now my suspicion that adding palm oil to their recipe has resulted in an inferior product has been affirmed by an expert I’ll be changing brands.

Deciding which brand I shift my affections to will require some stringent taste testing, but if I was basing my choice on advertisements I’d be tempted by this David vs Goliath effort from Whittakers:

The ODT covers the issue here.


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