Rural round-up

September 1, 2016

How NZ dairy is trying to rule the world – a Bloomberg view – Emma O’Brien:

International news agency Bloomberg has taken a close look at Fonterra – see what it’s telling the world about our dairy giant and its plans to pay out more to its farmers.

In the shadow of a snow-dusted volcano on New Zealand’s North Island, a sprawling expanse of stainless steel vats, chimneys and giant warehouses stands as a totem of the tiny nation’s dominance in the global dairy trade.

The Whareroa factory was until recently the largest of its kind, churning out enough milk powder, cheese and cream to fill more than three Olympic-sized swimming pools a week.

The plant has helped make owner Fonterra Cooperative Group the world’s top dairy exporter and its farmer-suppliers among the greatest beneficiaries of China’s emerging thirst for milk. . . 

Image may contain: 1 person , text

It will not be enough for New Zealand to produce the best products in the world. Our produce will also have to reamin among the most sustainable. – John Key.

Seafood industry recognises its “stars”:

New Zealand seafood industry members who have made a significant contribution to the industry have been recognised in Wellington tonight in the inaugural Seafood Stars Awards.

The awards are part of the industry’s celebrations to mark the 30th anniversary of the fisheries Quota Management System with awards for excellence and innovation within the industry.

“Every day in fishing communities around the country thousands of people go to work to contribute to our $1.8 billion export industry whether it’s putting to sea in our inshore fisheries, working away from home in our deepwater fisheries, working on salmon and mussel farms, or onshore processing and marketing our products,” says Chief Executive Tim Pankhurst. . . 

Sealord to make significant investment in fishing fleet – Shareholders back $70m new vessel purchase:

The country’s first new deepwater fishery vessel in 20 years
Will bring operational efficiency, sustainability and 80 new local jobs
New Zealand deep sea fishing company Sealord is to make a $70 million investment in its fishing fleet with the purchase of a new state-of-the-art vessel.

Chief Executive Officer Steve Yung says Sealord’s shareholders, Maori-owned Moana New Zealand (Aotearoa Fisheries Limited) and Japanese company Nippon Suisan Kaisha, Ltd (Nissui), have committed to the vessel purchase, which they will part-fund.

“This will be the first new vessel for the country’s deepwater fishery in 20 years, since the introduction of Sealord’s FV Rehua, and the backing of our shareholders is clear demonstration of their long-term commitment to the business and support of our commercial and operational strategies. . . 

Zespri volumes, returns grow:

Zespri’s Annual Meeting today recapped the strong 2015/16 season for the kiwifruit industry – record sales and highest-ever total grower returns – as well as charting the industry’s future as the government approves amendments to the Kiwifruit Regulations.

2015/16 season recap

Zespri Chairman Peter McBride explains total sales revenue for the season grew to hit a record high of $1.9 billion, up 22 percent from the previous season. The total fruit and service payment to growers for New Zealand-grown fruit also grew 22 percent on the previous year to $1.143 billion, with average return per hectare reaching a record $60,758. . . 

Cracker potential for NZ cheese exports – Alexa Cook:

New Zealand needs to realise the export potential of its cheese market, UK industry veteran Juliet Harbutt says.

Mrs Harbutt, who established the British Cheese Awards, said New Zealand should pay as much attention to the value and money that could be made with cheese as it did with its wine industry.

“The extraordinary thing in New Zealand is that we’ve got all this wonderful land and fantastic grazing and all these cows, yet we still seem to be producing the vast majority of it into milk powder and cheddar,” said Mrs Harbutt, who has worked in the UK cheese industry for 30 years. . .

Exports could be affected by horticulture worker shortage – Alexa Cook:

New Zealand’s exports could suffer if demand for horticulture workers isn’t met, a primary industries training organisation says.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is aiming for the horticulture sector to reach $5.7 billion in exports by 2020, up $1.6 billion from the end of last year.

An MPI report shows that the horticulture industry needs nearly 8000 skilled workers by 2025 to cope with the predicted rise in production and export earning.  . . 

Farmers should get ready to cast their votes – Chris Lewis:

When you exercise your vote in October, make it count towards candidates who understand the rural community.

Last week I spoke about uncontested local election candidates who get a free pass on any accountability for their part in current issues.

It is so important that farmers get out and vote for candidates who can better represent them. If we don’t it makes the job of Federated Farmers so much harder.

The sad truth is the farming community is stuck with an old system of capital-based rates versus the central government’s existing tax on earnings.

Comparable to other residents, farmers pay significant sums of money to fund community services. It feels like we’re the ATM machines that keep councils’ lights on. . . 

Image may contain: outdoor and one or more people

Money can’t buy happiness but it can buy cows.


Rural round-up

June 17, 2013

40% productivity rise realistic – Sally Rae:

On-farm productivity gains in the New Zealand sheep industry over the past 25 years have been an ”extraordinary story”, AbacusBio consultant Dr Peter Fennessy says.

Productivity, which drove profitability, had been increasing at about 2.5% a year, which he attributed to a combination of genetics and management.

There had been genetic improvement through consolidation of the ram-breeding sector and larger ram-breeding flocks, and uptake of new technology (rams and pasture) and better pasture management. . .

Working within cap on nitrogen – Sally Rae:

“As a nation, we cannot continue to have conversations about protecting water quality without having a parallel set of conversations that redefine the New Zealand farming business model.”

So says Taupo farmer and entrepreneur Mike Barton, who, when faced with what was effectively a cap on stock numbers, sought to increase the value of the product he produced.

A nitrogen cap was imposed on farmers around Lake Taupo to protect its water quality, with 35,000ha of land now covenanted for 999 years to remove 20% of manageable nitrogen. . .

Fonterra invests further $30m into Whareroa:

Fonterra has announced a further $30 million investment to expand its Dry Distribution Centre at its Whareroa site in Taranaki.

This follows a $23 million upgrade of the Whareroa coolstores last year, bringing the total capital investment in the logistics infrastructure on site to more than $50 million since 2011.

Fonterra Director of Logistics, Mark Leslie, says the project is part of Fonterra’s overall drive to simplify their supply chain and reduce the associated costs.

“These investments are part of a strategy to deliver more products, more directly to ports for export. . . “

Fieldays; washer cleans up– Jackie Harrigan:

Taranaki dairy farmer Simon Washer made a clean sweep of the Fieldays Rural Bachelor of the Year Competition for 2013.

After a busy week of an Amazing Race through the North Island followed by a series of eight challenges at Mystery Creek, 25-year-old Simon won the People’s Choice Award – having built his Facebook following to more than 700 likes – before being presented with the Golden Gumboot Award for overall Rural Bachelor of the Year.

Simon is sharemilking in coastal Taranaki and a motor-cross and trail riding fan who is also involved in Young Farmers and chairman of his local club. . .

Green’s Taranaki claims poppycock – Harvey Leach:

What we saw on TV3’s Campbell Live about landfarming in Taranaki and then got from a Green Party media release was straight out of the conspiracy theorists’ playbook.

The Green Party called on Fonterra to stop taking milk from land in Taranaki that it said had been spread with oil and fracking waste, which included toxic chemicals.

This divides things into “everyone even remotely involved-qualified versus me”. In our case, those remotely involved-qualified were landowners, Fonterra, Taranaki Regional Council, petroleum companies and the Petroleum Exploration and Production Association. The “me” in this story was the Green Party of Dr Russel Norman. . .

 


%d bloggers like this: