Rural round-up

16/07/2020

Government tinkering with the ETS only gives the fossil fuel industry a get out of jail free card – Corina Jordan:

The recent tinkering with the flawed Emissions Trading Scheme will mean little to many New Zealanders.

But the outcome will. That’s because the proposed changes won’t address climate change issues, but will lead to large-scale land use change, with a devastating impact on our landscape and continue to allow fossil fuel industry a get-out-of-jail free card.

These policy and economic instruments that sit within the Climate Change Response Act and the Emissions Trading Reform Bill allow fossil fuel emitters unlimited ability to offset their pollution by planting trees.

The pastoral industry is effectively being asked to pick up the tab for other industries’ pollution and we have seen a major increase in the sale of sheep and beef farms into forestry in the last year. . . 

NZ wood ad ‘implies farmers are dumb’ if they don’t embrace forestry – Esther Taunton:

Sheep and beef farmers are up in arms over an advertisement which they say implies they’re stupid if they don’t plant trees on their land.

The NZ Wood advertisement, screened on TVNZ One on Sunday night, opens with footage of a smoking chimney, gridlocked traffic and melting ice.

“The time to stop runaway global warming is running out,” a voiceover says. . . 

 

Falling co-product prices prompt changes – Allan Barber:

The sale of Wallace Group’s tanning, rendering and composting operations in the Waikato, Northland and Manawatu is the latest step in the consolidation process of what is often termed the fifth quarter of the meat industry. Since it began in the late nineteenth century the industry has had to invest significant capital in facilities which were not just designed to process animals for meat production, but also to dispose of the parts of the carcase left over from its primary purpose, otherwise known as by-products or more politely co-products.  

 Co-products include hides and pelts, tallow, meat and bone meal, tripe, tendons, blood and intestines for sausage casings and more recently medical applications. Apart from meal and tallow their market value has really suffered in recent years, the worst effects being experienced in the leather industry which has seen prices for hides and, more particularly, pelts lose much of their value. Wool on pelts have minimal value, while shorn pelts are now negative or are going straight to landfill, while hide prices, especially for cull cow and bull, have been affected by changes in fashion and consumer preference for non-animal products. Wool which used to have a comparable value to the meat return has unfortunately declined to the point where it is now shorn more for animal health than profit reasons. . . 

Regulation risks hindering innovation – Allan Barber:

The fast pace of regulatory change by the government poses a challenge for farmers trying to earn their social licence to operate.

The Emissions Trading Reform Bill and the proposed Essential Freshwater Policy are the two latest examples of regulation which are set to be introduced into law before the Election and will inevitably impose serious costs or penalties on farmers as currently drafted Some provisions run counter to good, common sense farming practices, and the ETR has the potential to side swipe the sheep and beef sector, as it incentivises the conversion of sheep and beef farms into forestry.

Representative organisations, Beef + Lamb NZ, DairyNZ and Federated Farmers, are working hard on behalf of their members to mitigate the most heavy-handed aspects of the regulation, while at the same time providing farmers with information and tools to enhance on farm environmental performance in line with the comprehensive set of commitments made last year. . . 

Just when you thought wheat yields couldn’t improve :

Ashburton arable farmer Eric Watson has taken out the Guinness World Record for the Highest wheat yield for the second time, beating his former record crop density by 607 kilograms per hectare.

Mr Watson, who farms with his wife, Maxine, at Wakanui, produced an incredible 17.398 tonnes per hectare wheat crop, beating his previous record crop grown in 2017 that delivered 16.791 tonnes of wheat per hectare.

On average, irrigated wheat yields in New Zealand produce about 12 tonnes per hectare, demonstrating how remarkable the latest record is as an achievement admired by the wider industry, and providing insights into innovations for future growth.

Mr Watson was thrilled with the result as he strove to continually improve and make advancements to his yields and farming operation. . . 

Campaign champions farmers’ work in boosting bees:

A week-long initiative has commenced today looking to champion the work done on farms to provide habitat for bees and other pollinators.

Bees’ Needs Week, taking place from 13 to 19 July, is an annual event coordinated by Defra working alongside farming and conservation groups.

Bees and other pollinators play a crucial role in food production and agriculture, and are also vital to wider ecosystems in the UK.

Scientists say pollinators contribute the equivalent of more than £500m a year to British agriculture and food production, by improving crop quality and quantity. . .


Rural round-up

23/07/2018

Sharemilkers vital, new section chairman says – Sally Rae:

A new farming leader believes sharemilkers are a vital part of New Zealand’s dairy industry.

Grant Tremewan has been elected as the North Otago Federated Farmers sharemilkers’ section chairman. He is passionate about sharemilking being retained as a viable pathway into farming and valued for its contribution.

”It’s the competitive advantage of the dairy industry, where much of its productivity and innovation comes from.

”I want to see sharemilkers treated fairly . .

Beingmate has muted Fonterra’s Chinese hum – Point of Order:

Fonterra is “humming” in China, according  to  a headline  in the  NZ  Herald,  although the  text  of the article beneath it mentioned  the  “woes”  associated with  the co-op’s investment  in Beingmate.

The  co-op  is having to absorb   an impairment of   $405m    on the value of its 18.8%  holding in Beingmate.  On top of the $183m payment it has had to make  French  giant  Danone, the  writedown  takes the gloss off that  otherwise  “humming”  performance.

Some of its farmer-shareholders may be looking over the  fence to  the rather different  outcome  for A2 Milk, which lifted its annual  sales  68% in the June year,  with  revenue   rising  from $549m in the June  2017 year  to  $922m.  During  the latest  year A2  Milk achieved gross margins  up  to  49%.   . .

Wallace Group extends Southland operations; achieves nationwide slink and casualty cow collection service:

Nationwide coproducts business Wallace Group today announced it had extended operations in Southland with the addition of a Mataura processing site, requiring around 20 seasonal contractors and 30 seasonal staff.

Wallace Group Chief Executive Officer, Graham Shortland says, “We’re very pleased to have extended our presence in Southland. The recycling of coproducts from the agricultural sector performs a valuable service for farmers and processors as well as protecting the natural environment from the impact of dead stock. . .

Otago/Southland named best Young Farmers’ region:

Otago/Southland has been named the country’s best NZ Young Farmers region.

The region’s members cheered excitedly when the award was announced in Invercargill.

“Our clubs are welcoming and well connected which ensures lots of interclub activities,” he said.

Marlborough wine – protecting and promoting the real deal:

A new initiative has been launched to safeguard Marlborough’s wine reputation and Lawson’s Dry Hills is among the first to jump on board.

The protection of ‘brand Marlborough’ has been under discussion for some years but with the proliferation of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc labels over recent times, a group of key industry people led by Ivan Sutherland of Dog Point Vineyards, have been spurred into action. . .

Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 announced:

Congratulations to Ben Richards from Indevin who became the Bayer Marlborough Young Viticulturist of the Year 2018 on Friday 13th July.

This is the second consecutive year Richards has competed in the National Final, however he was representing Hawke’s Bay in 2017 as he was working at Indevin’s vineyards there and finishing his degree at EIT. At the start of this year he was promoted to Viticultural Technician for Indevin and moved to Marlborough, so is delighted to represent his new region in this year’s National Final. , ,

Honey venture big winner at North Maori business awards:

The efforts of a 100 percent Maori-owned company specialising in manuka honey production have been recognised with two awards, including the coveted Taitokerau Maori Business of the Year award.

Kaitaia-based Tai Tokerau Honey was named overall winner, as well as securing the Northland Regional Council’s Excellence in Environmental Awareness and Management category, when the business awards were held in Whangarei recently. .


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