Rural round-up

November 5, 2012

Fonterra: land of milk and money – The Economist:

ALTHOUGH New Zealand still has seven times as many sheep as people, cows drive its economy these days. Dairy products are a quarter of the country’s exports, giving it a third of the world’s dairy trade. Large tracts of sheep pasture and forest are being converted to churn out more milk, or “white gold”.

Bestriding the local market with a share of over 90% is Fonterra, a co-operative formed in 2001 as a national champion, from two smaller entities and the former New Zealand Dairy Board. The only truly global Kiwi company, with annual revenue of almost NZ$20 billion ($16.4 billion), Fonterra operates in 100 countries and has 10,500 farmer-owners. Rabobank of the Netherlands ranks it the world’s fourth-largest dairy company. . .

‘Grand career’ but concerns for future – Sally Rae:

Professor Frank Griffin sums up his lengthy career in animal science with a simple comment – “it’s grand”.

For three decades, Prof Griffin has led a University of Otago-based research team devoted to solving animal health problems in the deer industry.

That work has included developing diagnostic tests for the detection of two major bacterial diseases of New Zealand deer – bovine tuberculosis and Johne’s disease – and a vaccine for the prevention of yersiniosis.

Widely respected in the industry, he was recently one of 11 researchers and scholars elected as Fellows of the Royal Society of New Zealand. . .

Farm Environment Ambassadors Go On Tour to Promote Sustainability

‘Good things take time’, was the key message delivered by the National Winners of the 2012 Ballance Farm Environment Awards, Blair and Jane Smith, to some of the nation’s leading politicians.

In October, the North Otago farmers addressed the Primary Production Select Committee in their role as ambassadors for good environmental practice.

The address to the multi-party parliamentary committee was part of a six-day tour organised by the New Zealand Farm Environment Trust. . .

Working towards water standards – Groping Towards Bethlehem:

Various colleagues and I have been trying for years to get research funded on the preferences of New Zealanders regarding the environment. Bits and pieces of work get done — notably, the public perception work by Huey, Cullen, and Kerr from Lincoln University (here’s a summary conference paper (pdf)). We have grander ambitions, though. We want to understand the rank ordering of different environmental attributes amongst different subpopulations, and the economic value of those attributes in comparison to other things of value. Methodologically, it wouldn’t break much new ground. That’s actually a strength. If we end up squabbling over method, that’s taking away from the content of the findings.

Why? Isn’t it obvious that we want clear air and clean water and biodiversity? Well, yes, it is. We also want health care and tertiary education and public transportation and wi-fi and rainbows and unicorns. Maybe not unicorns. But you get the drift. . .

2013 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming Award Launched 80th Anniversary Commemorated:

Māori sheep and beef farmers who compete in the 2013 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Māori Excellence in Farming award this year will be part of the competitions 80th anniversary commemorations.

Entry for the competition is now open following its launch by the Minister of Māori Affairs, Hon Dr Pita Sharples at the Federation of Māori Authorities conference in Taupo on Saturday November 3th 2012.

The Minister also launched the Ahuwhenua Young Maori Trainee/Cadet competition, the first for young Maori sheep and beef farmers. This award was introduced last year for young Maori dairy farmers. . .

Search for the 2013 Ahuwhenua Young Māori Sheep and Beef Trainee/Cadet of the Year begins:

The search is on for the 2013 Ahuwhenua Young Māori Trainee/Cadet of the Year. On Saturday 3 November the competition was officially launched by the Minister of Māori Affairs Hon Dr Pita Sharples at the Federation of Māori Authorities conference in Taupo.

This is the first year the competition has targeted young Māori sheep and beef farmers. . .

MPI backs awards for Maori farming excellence:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) today announced it is a gold sponsor of the 2013 Ahuwhenua Trophy BNZ Maori Excellence in Farming Award.

The competition was launched at the Federation of Maori Authorities (FoMA) conference in Taupo on Saturday (3 November).

Ben Dalton, Deputy Director General Maori Primary Sector Partnerships, said MPI had increased its sponsorship to build on a longstanding involvement with the competition.

“MPI is committed to working with Maori to enable the sustainable growth of their primary sector assets and this competition fits well with our objectives,” Mr Dalton said.

“Maori agribusiness has a significant part to play in lifting the primary sector contribution to New Zealand’s economy. By increasing Maori primary sector productivity, we increase the wealth of New Zealand as a whole. . .

High Level Of Interest In Maori Agribusiness Funding Round:

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is reporting a high level of interest from groups seeking to promote sustainable resource use in Maori agribusiness.

MPI’s Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) provides co-funding for small to medium-scale applied research and extension projects.

In August 2012, MPI held a special SFF round for Maori agribusiness, offering approximately $1 million of co-investment funding.

MPI has committed to undertake activities that specifically foster opportunities for Maori agribusiness. . .

Both Sides of the Fence:

A resource for teachers and children from Walking Access NZ.


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