One std for town, higher one for country

23/12/2019

Farmers are angry over Te Papa’s portrayal of dairying:

Farmers have hit out at Te Papa over its use of fake farm stream water, calling the move “a disgrace” and accusing the national museum of having a biased agenda.

The outrage comes after National MP Todd Muller tweeted a picture of the bottle of dyed brown water, part of a display in the museum’s Te Taiao Nature exhibition.

The bottle features an image of a cow defecating in a waterway and indicates the water is from the Waikato. . .

Muller said the bottle and its contents were a “completely unrealistic” depiction of rural life and the work farmers were doing to improve and protect waterways.

“It’s a ridiculous, simplistic image. Dairy farmers have fenced almost all of the rivers and streams on their properties in the last decade and cows can’t get near them,” he said.

“Displays like this are part of the reason farmers are feeling so beaten up – everywhere they look, there’s the narrative that they’re destroying the environment.” . .

It wasn’t even a genuine sample:

DairyNZ said we’re not mad, we’re just disappointed:

It’s incredibly disappointing to see our national museum Te Papa reinforcing an overly simplistic anti-farming narrative that negatively impacts the public’s perception of New Zealand farmers and the dairy sector” DairyNZ Chief Executive Dr Tim Mackle says.

“The water in their display is not reflective of what your average farm stream in NZ would look like. If you don’t believe me, you just need to look at the countless videos and pictures farmers have posted to social media to correct the perception.

“Farmers were right in demanding to know when and where this water was taken from. Te Papa have since confessed that the water wasn’t actually from a farm at all but was made up in a back room using brown dye.

“It’s not just about the quality of the water in the bottle either” Dr Mackle added.

“The imagery on the bottle of a cow standing in water defecating is highly deceptive and entirely out of step with the reality of dairy farming in New Zealand today where we are proud to have fenced off 98.3% of waterways in recent years.

“Farmers who have done the right thing and voluntarily invested their time and their money to fence off waterways and plant riparian strips deserve better than this from their national museum.

“Dairy farmers have fenced over 24,744km of waterways.

Under the Sustainable Dairy Water Accord New Zealand dairy farmers have achieved some fantastic results: 98.3% of waterways have been fenced on dairy farms to keep cattle out, 100% of stock crossing points have bridges and culverts and 100% of farms have been assessed for effluent management practices.

“The situation is all the more disappointing because it was only last week that we hosted our 7th annual Dairy Environment Leaders Forum dinner at Te Papa to celebrate the great work dairy farmers have undertaken.

“We think it’s great that Te Papa have produced a display on NZ’s water quality to help educate young kiwis, but it’s a real shame they haven’t taken the opportunity to tell the full story. DairyNZ would be happy to work with them on a fair and accurate display in the future.

“As a popular tourist attraction that is frequented by thousands of young families and international tourists each year Te Papa should be enhancing the brand of NZ Inc. instead of detracting from it with false information” Dr Mackle concluded.

Te Papa needs to get up to date and tell the modern story of farmers doing good work to protect and enhance waterways instead of buying into the out-dated dirty dairying rhetoric.

Meanwhile, Wellington wastewater is entering the harbour:

Wellington’s wastewater leak has been reduced to one-tenth of its size, meaning a new year’s dip at Oriental Bay could be on the cards.

Workers have worked  through nights after a wastewater pipe collapsed at the corner of Wills St and Dixon St on Friday.

At its peak it sent up to 100 litres of wastewater per second into the harbour – roughly a swimming pool’s worth per day.

On Sunday, this had been reduced to 10 litres per second after much of the wastewater was diverted through a disused 1890 pipe beneath Willis St, Wellington Water chief executive Colin Crampton said. . . 

That was an accident, this is dirty business as usual:

There’s a little creek running through suburban Auckland, a decent stride wide and water shin deep, that moonlights as one of the country’s biggest drains.

Not so long ago, it was called Waititiko, ‘water of the periwinkles;’ now, it’s a regular conduit for raw human sewage, and a living illustration of the city’s complicated relationship with waste. . . 

It’s a long read and a shocking indictment on successive councils that have not invested in the necessary infrastructure to cope with a growing city and it waste water.

Is it any wonder farmers are angry.

Urban councils get away with this disgusting pollution but farmers could be, and have been, fined for spilling effluent that could, that is has the potential to or might, reach a waterway.

Matthew Herbert has worked out the cost to councils if they were treated as farmers are:

It’s one standard for towns and another much higher and more expensive one for the country.


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