February 4 in history

04/02/2010

On February 4:

211 Roman Emperor Septimius Severus died, leaving the Roman Empire in the hands of his two quarrelsome sons, Caracalla and Geta.

Septimius Severus busto-Musei Capitolini.jpg

960 The coronation of Zhao Kuangyin as Emperor Taizu of Song, initiating the Song Dynasty period of China that would last more than three centuries.

1677 Johann Ludwig Bach, German composer, was born.

1703 In Edo (now Tokyo), 46 of the Forty-seven Ronin commited seppuku (ritual suicide) as recompense for avenging their master’s death.

 Incense burns at the burial graves of the 47 Ronin at Sengaku-ji.

1789 George Washington was unanimously elected as the first President of the United States by the U.S. Electoral College.

1792 George Washington was unanimously elected to a second term as President of the United States by the U.S. Electoral College.

1794 The French legislature abolished slavery throughout all territories of the French Republic.

1810 The Royal Navy seized Guadeloupe.

1820 The Chilean Navy under the command of Lord Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald completed the 2 day long capture of Valdivia with just 300 men and 2 ships.

 

1825 The Ohio Legislature authorizes the construction of the Ohio and Erie Canal and the Miami and Erie Canal.

1859 The Codex Sinaiticus was discovered in Egypt.

 Luke 11, 2 in Codex Sinaiticus

1902 Charles Lindbergh, American pilot, was born.

1905 Hylda Baker, English comedy actress, was born.

1913 Rosa Parks, American civil rights activistwas, born.

1915 – Ray Evans, American songwriter with Jay Livingston, was born.

1915 Norman Wisdom, English actor and comedian, was born.

1921 Betty Friedan, American feminist, was born.

1921 Lotfi Asker Zadeh, American-Iranian/Russian mathematician and computer scientist and the father of fuzzy logic., was born.

1936 Radium becomes the first radioactive element to be made synthetically.

1941 The United Service Organization (USO) was created to entertain American troops.

Small web logo.jpg

1941 John Steel, British musician (The Animals), was born.

 

1945 World War II: The Yalta Conference began.

 The “Big Three” at the Yalta Conference, Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin. Also present are Admiral of the Fleet Sir Andrew Cunningham, RN, Marshal of the RAF Sir Charles Portal, RAF (both standing behind Churchill); and Fleet Admiral William D. Leahy, USN, (standing behind Roosevelt).

1947  Dan Quayle, 44th Vice President of the United States, was born.

1948 Alice Cooper, American musician, was born.

1948 Ceylon (later renamed Sri Lanka) became independent.

1957 The first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus (SSN-571), logged its 60,000th nautical mile, matching the endurance of the fictional Nautilus described in Jules Verne‘s novel “20,000 Leagues Under the Sea”.

1966 All Nippon Airways Boeing 727 jet plunges into Tokyo Bay, killing 133.

1967  Lunar Orbiter 3 lifted off from Cape Canaveral’s Launch Complex 13 on its mission to identify possible landing sites for the Surveyor and Apollo spacecraft.

Lunar orbiter 1 (large).jpg

1969 Yasser Arafat took over as chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization.

1974 The Symbionese Liberation Army kidnapped Patty Hearst in Berkeley, California.

 

1975 American Lynne Cox became the first woman to swim Cook Strait when she swam from the North Island to the South in a time of 12 hours 2 minutes and 30 seconds.

First woman to swim Cook Strait

1975 Haicheng earthquake (magnitude 7.3 on the Richter scale) occurs in Haicheng, Liaoning, China.

1976 In Guatemala and Honduras an earthquake killed more than 22,000.

1980 Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini named Abolhassan Banisadr as president of Iran.

1985 The New Zealand Labour government refused the USS Buchanan entry to the country on the grounds that the United States would neither confirm nor deny that the ship had nuclear capability.

USS <em>Buchanan</em> refused entry to NZ

1992 A Coup d’état led by Hugo Chávez Frías, against Venezuelan President Carlos Andrés Pérez.

             

1996 Major snowstorm paralysed Midwestern United States, Milwaukee, Wisconsin tied all-time record low temperature at -26°F (-32.2°C)

1997 Two Israeli Sikorsky CH-53 troop-transport helicopters collided in mid-air over northern Galilee, Israel killing 73.

1997 Serbian  President Slobodan Milošević recognised opposition victories in the November 1996 elections.

1998 An earthquake measuring 6.1 on the Richter Scale in northeast Afghanistan killed more than 5,000.

1999 Unarmed West African immigrant Amadou Diallo was shot dead by four plainclothes New York City police officers on an urelated stake-out, inflaming race-relations in the city.

1999 The New Carissa ran aground near Coos Bay, Oregon.

The New Carissa
 

2003 The Federal Republic of Yugoslavia was officially renamed to Serbia and Montenegro and adopted a new constitution.

2004 Facebook, a mainstream online social network was founded by Mark Zuckerberg.

Facebook.svg 

2006 A stampede occured in the ULTRA Stadium near Manila killing 71.

2008 – The London Low Emission Zone (LEZ) scheme began to oeprate.

LOWEMZONEfeb08.PNG

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia.


January 21 in history

21/01/2010

On January 21:

1189 – Philip II of France and Richard I of England began to assemble troops to wage the Third Crusade.

Siege of Acre.jpg

1525 – The Swiss Anabaptist Movement is born when Conrad Grebel, Felix Manz, George Blaurock, and about a dozen others baptize each other in the home of Manz’s mother in Zürich, breaking a thousand-year tradition of church-state union.

1643 Abel Tasman was the first European to reach Tonga.

Fragment of “Portrait of Abel Tasman, his wife and daughter” attributed to Jacob Gerritsz Cuyp,

1749 – The Verona Philharmonic Theatre was destroyed by fire.

1789 The first American novel, The Power of Sympathy or the Triumph of Nature Founded in Truth, was printed in Boston, Massachusetts.

  • 1793 – After being found guilty of treason by the French Convention, Louis XVI of France was executed by guillotine.
  • 1824   Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, American, Confederate army general was born.

    Stonewall Jackson.jpg

    1864 – The Tauranga Campaign started during the New Zealand Land Wars.

    1887 – Brisbane received a daily rainfall of 465 millimetres (18.3 inches), a record for any Australian capital city.

    1893 – The Tati Concessions Land, formerly part of Matabeleland, was formally annexed to the Bechuanaland Protectorate, which is now Botswana.

    1899 – Opel manufactured its first automobile.

    Opel logo.svg

    1905 Christian Dior, French fashion designer, was born.

    Christian Dior
    Christian Dior - book cover.jpg

    1908 – New York City passed the Sullivan Ordinance, making it illegal for women to smoke in public, but the measure was vetoed by the mayor.

    1911 – The first Monte Carlo Rally.

    1915 – Kiwanis International  was founded in Detroit, Michigan.

     
    Kiwanis-logo.png

    1919 – Meeting of the First Dáil Éireann in the Mansion House Dublin. Sinn Féin adopted Ireland’s first constitution. The first engagement of Irish War of Independence, Sologhead Beg, County Tipperary.

    1921 The Italian Communist Party was founded at Livorno.

    1924 Benny Hill, English actor, comedian, and singer, was born.

    1925  Albania declared itself a republic.

    1938 Wolfman Jack, American disk jockey and actor, was born.

    1940  Jack Nicklaus, American golfer, was born.

    JackNicklaus.cropped.jpg

    1941 Plácido Domingo, Spanish tenor, was born.

     

    1942,  Mac Davis, American musician, was born.


    1944 New Zealand & Australia signed the Canberra Pact, which was an undertaking by both countries to co-operate on international matters, especially in the Pacific.

    NZ and Australia sign the Canberra Pact

    1950 Billy Ocean, West Indian musician, was born.

     1953 Paul Allen, American entrepreneur, co-founder of Microsoft, was born.

    1954 – The first nuclear-powered submarine, the USS Nautilus (SSN-571), was launched in Groton, Connecticut by Mamie Eisenhower, the First Lady of the United States.

    1958 – The last Fokker C.X in military service, the Finnish Air Force FK-111 target tower, crashed, killing the pilot and winch-operator.

    1960 – Miss Sam, a female rhesus monkey, lifted off from Wallops Island, Virginia, aboard Little Joe 1B – an unmanned test of the Mercury spacecraft.

     

    1968 Battle of Khe Sanh – One of the most publicised and controversial battles of the Vietnam War began.

    1974 Rove McManus, Australian television host and comedian, was born.

    1976 – Commercial service of Concorde began with London-Bahrain and Paris-Rio routes.

    1976 Emma Bunton, English singer (Spice Girls), was born.

    1977 – President Jimmy Carter pardoned nearly all American Vietnam War draft evaders.

    1981 – Tehran released United States hostages after 444 days.

    1997 – Newt Gingrich became the first leader of the United States House of Representatives to be internally disciplined for ethical misconduct.

    1999 – War on Drugs: In one of the largest drug busts in American history, the United States Coast Guard intercepted a ship with over 4,300 kg (9,500 lb) of cocaine on board.

    2002 – The Canadian Dollar set all-time low against the US Dollar (US$0.6179).

    2008 – Black Monday in worldwide stock markets. FTSE 100 had its biggest ever one-day points fall, European stocks closed with their worst result since 11 September 2001, and Asian stocks dropped as much as 15%.

    Sourced from NZ hisotry Online & Wikipedia.


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