WTO rules aainst USA CoOL on meat

May 20, 2015

The World Trade Organisation has ruled that labels on red meat in the United States that say where the animals were born, raised and slaughtered will have to be dropped or revised.

The office of the U.S. Trade Representative said the WTO has rejected a final U.S. appeal, deciding that the U.S. “country of origin” labels put Canadian and Mexican livestock at a disadvantage.

The Obama administration had previously revised labels to try to comply with WTO obligations. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack has said that if the WTO ruled against the final U.S. appeal, Congress will have to weigh in to avoid retaliation – such as extra tariffs – from the two neighbour countries. . .

Though the ruling went against the U.S., it’s a victory for the U.S. meat industry, which has said the labels are burdensome. Meat processors quickly called for repeal of the labelling laws after the WTO decision.

Canada and Mexico issued a joint statement calling on the United States to repeal the labelling rules and saying they will seek authorization from the WTO to take retaliatory measures against U.S. exports.

The joint statement of Canadian and Mexican agriculture and trade officials said the rules cause Canadian and Mexican livestock and meat to be segregated from those of U.S. origin. The labeling is “damaging to North America’s supply chain and is harmful to producers and processors in all three countries,” the officials said. . .

I don’t support compulsory Country of Origin Labelling (CoOL) but I don’t understand why labels which give consumers information on which they might want to base their purchases has been disallowed.


USA fracking helps NZ dairying

October 31, 2013

Tweet of the day:

Federated Farmers@FedFarmers 46m

Fracking will mean the United States will be energy self-sufficient that will make the US dairy Industry uncompetitive. ..good news that!

We like good news for dairying in #gigatownoamaru .


USA shut down

October 1, 2013

An impasse between the USA’s  Republican House and Democrat Senate has shut down the government:

. . . Shortly before midnight, the White House budget office issued a memo instructing agencies to “execute plans for an orderly shutdown due to the absence of appropriations.”

The impasse means 800,000 federal workers will be furloughed Tuesday. National parks, monuments and museums, as well as most federal offices, will close. Tens of thousands of air-traffic controllers, prison guards and Border Patrol agents will be required to serve without pay. And many congressional hearings — including one scheduled for Tuesday on last month’s Washington Navy Yard shootings — will be postponed.

In a last-minute ray of hope for active-duty troops, Congress on Monday approved and sent to the White House an agreement to keep issuing military paychecks. But Obama warned that the broader economy, which is finally starting to recover from the shocks of the past six years, would take a substantial hit if congressional gridlock shutters “America’s largest employer.” . .

If our government shut down the rest of the world might not notice but what happens in the USA will have an international impact.

It’s already boosted our dollar.

The New Zealand dollar held its gains against the greenback on speculation a prolonged US government shutdown and an more weighty debate about the debt ceiling this month will sap demand for US dollars.

The kiwi traded at 83.04 US cents at 5pm in Wellington, holding its gains through the day from 82.84 cents late yesterday. The trade-weighted index was at 77.32, up from 77.19 the previous day.

It went past midnight in Washington, with no apparent agreement between the White House and Republicans, meaning the White House Office of Management and Budget would have ordered state agencies to begin shutting down services the government can’t pay for. A bigger threat is this month’s
deadline to lift the US$16.7 trillion debt ceiling or face possible default on debt payments. . .

There’s been several positive announcements on the New Zealand economy this week and expectations of reasonable growth.

But no matter how well we’re doing here, we’re not big enough to counter major problems in the rest of the world.

 


Independence Day

July 4, 2012

Happy Independence Day to the USA.

This time last year we were in New York and watched the Macy’s fireworks display from the deck of the aircraft carrier, now museum, Intrepid.

Walking back to our hotel we serendipitously wandered into Don’t Tell Mama which served delicious food.

 


US dairy offer not up to scratch – Groser

June 7, 2012

Trade Minister Tim Groser says the USA is yet to produce an acceptable offer on dairy access in Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) trade talks.

Despite two years of formal negotiations, he says, the US is yet to produce anything of substance on the dairy market, the biggest prize for New Zealand in the TPP.

“We are not going to sign up to a deal that doesn’t improve the export position of our principal exports,” he says. “We will wait and play our cards in the endgame.”

The USA dairy lobby must have strength far in excess of its numbers to keep negotiations stalling on the issue of access for our produce.

Any benefit to the relatively small number of them from protection comes at the cost of higher prices and less choice for many millions of consumers.


C’mon Black

September 16, 2011

Russia scored first in their first Rugby World Cup game last night but my pick the USA finished ahead.

Tonight of course I’m backing black though if Japan was playing anyone else but New Zealand I’d be tempted to opt for them.

Blokes who are men enough to call themselves the Blossoms deserve support.


USA does deal

August 1, 2011

USA  leaders have done a deal to raise the debt ceiling.

Congressional leaders of both parties and President Obama said they have agreed to a framework for a fiscal deal that they will present to their caucuses Monday morning, moving Congress closer to taking up a measure that could pass both the House and Senate with bipartisan support and be signed by President Obama, averting a fiscal calamity.

The two Senate leaders, Harry Reid of Nevada and Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, announced the agreement on the Senate floor and President Obama a few moments later. He indicated he would support it, although it was not his preferred approach.

“It will allow us to avoid default,” he said.

The threat of the USA defaulting on its debt was never very real, but even so this is good news for not only the USA but all the other countries whose economies are intertwined with it.


%d bloggers like this: