Phantom Billstickers’ National Poetry Day

August 25, 2017

It’s Phantom Billstickers’ National Poetry Day.

It’s our twentieth anniversary! This year’s packed programme features more than 100 dynamic and accessible events, workshops and competitions, featuring acclaimed poets, new voices, young writers, and poetry enthusiasts. From slam poetry to sonnets, from stages to pavements, poetry will be created and enjoyed in a myriad of venues around the country: cafes, bars, schools, university campuses, community centres, retirement villages, marae, libraries and theatres – as well as on buses, trains and ferries. . .

I can do doggeral but real poetry defies me.

That doesn’t prevent me from enjoying it.

And to those who ask what’s the point?, I offer this from the Tuesday’s Poets in answer to why they gave their poems for free:

“Tuesday Poem’s poetry is offered ‘for free’ because we believe in community and in the idea of a gift economy in which our poets’ words facilitate relationship and connection and are a voice for a diverse group people. Poetry is a way to build bridges and celebrate our common humanity.” Claire

and

“People are still touched by poetry and search for it for this reason. There is something sustaining there. Something we need. People need poetry for other reasons too – for personal reasons: consolation, etc – the compressed language and short controlled lines paradoxically restraining and releasing feeling. Oh, and there’s more – I do think poetry goes to the heart of what it is to be human, which is based on the deep need we have for language and rhythm and music. Something beyond the basic physical needs. Something that you would call spiritual, or perhaps ‘being open to wonder’.” Mary

It has been a privilege and very great joy being in this poetry boat with you all. Warmest gratitude to all our poets and our readers near and far. T. S. Eliot wrote ‘We shall not cease from our exploration, and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time’. Which takes us back to the opening lines of our collaborative poem –

So
now you are privy to
a thousand thousand things. Jennifer Compton . .

If you click on the Tuesday Poem link, you’ll find the rest of the collaborative poem and five years of Tuesday’s poems.

 


Rural round-up

June 25, 2013

MIE may be sailing into a head wind – Allan Barber:

The Meat Industry Excellence (MIE) group has appointed businessman and former sheep and beef farmer Ross Hyland to set up an establishment team, as it ramps up its campaign to achieve a restructure of the red meat sector.

After a series of meetings round the country at which it gained plenty of farmer support for its campaign, as well as backing from Beef & Lamb NZ and Federated Farmers, MIE has decided that it is now time to inject some muscle and structure into its plans. Chairman Richard Young said last week they had made this decision to ensure that they have an agreed solution and plan ready for the start of next season. . .

MPI says snow recovery progressing:

The Ministry for Primary Industries says South Island farmers are coping with recent heavy snowfall.

Snow has finally stopped falling in the most affected parts of the South Island hill and high country, says Trish Burborough, MPI’s Resource Policy South Island Regions manager (based in Dunedin).

She says the worst-affected areas are parts of Otago, Canterbury and Marlborough, especially in the high country above 400 metres.

“Rural communities are helping each other in practical ways, such as helping stock gain access to feed and water.

“MPI has been working with the Rural Support Trusts (RSTs) and Federated Farmers to coordinate the response. . .

Rural confidence soars after drought jitters – Jason Krupp:

The farming sector has shaken off its drought jitters, with economic confidence soaring in most rural regions, the latest Westpac McDermott Miller survey shows.

The national figures show confidence rose to 25 per cent by the end of the June quarter, up from 5 per cent at the end of March.

That was predominantly driven by a swing in rural sentiment.

Senior Westpac economist Felix Delbrucker said a generally improving global outlook and the Canterbury rebuild were certainly tailwinds, but the clincher was higher dairy prices offsetting the impact of the drought in the first part of the year. . .

Three and a half weeks in Turkey, most of the time outside Istanbul, have provided many revelations about the people, the country and not least about its agricultural production. Turkey, or to be more precise its government, wants to join the EU, although after the last couple of years of economic struggles and Eurozone problems, it isn’t clear why.

Turkey has enjoyed higher growth in the past decade than any EU member with only one year of contraction. Agriculture represents 25% of employment across an unmatched product base, although the sector is not very efficient with many small farmers and relatively unsophisticated farming methods. Subsidies are still in place, but are in the process of being reduced as part of the process of meeting the EU’s accession criteria. . . .

Leaders forum for young horticulturists:

Eight competitors from the Young Horticulturist of the Year met recently for a Young Leaders’ Forum.

The Auckland forum was established to provide an opportunity for the Young Horticulturists to develop their understanding of the industry and round out their knowledge beyond their sector specialty.

The two days featured presentations from sponsors Bayer, Fruitfed Supplies, Turners and Growers, ANZ and NZ Horticulture ITO. Presentation topics were selected to meet the forum’s theme of equipping future leaders for the challenges and aspirations of a sustainable and vibrant horticultural industry. . .

Oh Dirty River by Helen Lehndorf – Tuesday Poem:

The town where I grew up

was small, ugly and smelled
like burning blood.
 
Most of the dads and 
a lot of the mums and
heaps of the big brothers and sisters
worked at the Freezing Works. . .
(I used to link to each week’s Tuesday Poem and others in the side bar. I haven’t done it for ages because of time constraints,  but this one, and the commentary by Tim Jones  which follow it resonated with me.
My father was a carpenter at the freezing works a Pukeuri, a few kilometres north of Oamaru. The works were, and still are, an important part of the local economy. They were for many small towns then and still are for some today.)

National Poetry Day

July 22, 2011

It’s National Poetry Day.

 The link above will take you to a list of events aroudn the country.
 
Tuesday Poem has three poems for the day at the hub and links in the sidebar will take you to choices of other Tuesday poets.
 
I especially enjoyed The Raspberry-Coloured Hand-Knitted Cardigan by Jennifer Compton and in response to it by Mary McCallum (and her other) –If you buy the raspberry-coloured hand-knitted cardigan and unpick it .
 
Beattie’s Bookblog posts on Eden Tautali who won the National Schools Poetry Award with Nan a moving poem about her grandmother’s funeral.
 
Poems by all those shortlisted and the judges’ reports are online here.
 

Tuesday

April 11, 2011

The Tuesday poets have celebrated the first birthday of the Tuesday Poem blog with an unfolding communal poem for a birthday.

The poets explian:

We’re celebrating with a communal poem that will skip backwards and forwards across the world and between time zones over the coming week (NZ, Australia, UK, US), with the finished poem posted next Tuesday.
Our tag team of Tuesday Poets who live in the land of the sidebar (eyes right!) will add their lines to the unfolding poem at the rate of four or five entries a day until Sunday, and then the full poem will be up for a week.
The poets have also found time to publish other poems which are linked in the side bar.
Among them are:
Tuesday Afternoon in the Domain by Renee Liang.
Winning the Day by Catherine Bateson.
Us by James K Baxter.
Fresh Bread by Catherine Fitchett.
Spring is Here by Eileen Moeller.
Indian Summer by Ross Gillett.
The Second Wife by Chris Tse.
You Have to Walk Before You Can Fly by Helen Rickerby.
Indian Summer by

Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations

March 6, 2011

Excerpt from 15 Flower World Variations by Jerome Rothenberg was featured this week on the Tuesday Poem blog.

Some of the Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar responded to the earthquake:

Songs and Dances of Death by Catherine Fitchett

Storm Front by Helen Lowe

As the Earth Turns by Mary McCallum

Flutter by Brian Turner

Epicentre by Jennifer Compton

Kiwi Heros by Alicia Ponder

this fly – earthquake by Jeffrey Paparoa Holman

Christchurch to Greymouth by Renee Liang

Among some of the other Tuesday poets linked in the sidebar are:

Treasure by Saradha Koirala

Venice by Robyn Rowland


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