Negative TB test doesn’t mean no TB

07/06/2016

The headline says: Otago dairy herd to be slaughtered after one cow tests positive to tuberculosis.

It sounds like the farmer has no choice and that Ministry for Primary Industries is being unfair.

But he does have choices and the MPI is doing what the law requires and empowers it to do – keeping food safe and people healthy.

Only one cow has tested positive for TB but that doesn’t mean the rest of the herd is clear.

We had some cows test positive for TB a few years after we started dairying. All were slaughtered and vets who examined the carcasses found some, but not all of them had the disease.

The herd was tested again, any cows that were positive were killed and again some had TB and some didn’t.

Eventually the herd got several clear tests in a row but a couple of years later we had another cow test positive for TB.

We went through the culling and testing again until we got the all-clear.

More than a year after that a cow from our original herd dried herself off, was culled and sent to the works. There the vet found she was riddled with TB. She had been tested before we bought the herd, tested again several times on our farm but not once did she react positively.

A vet told us that was because she was too busy fighting the disease to react to the test.

Our milk is pasteurised so there was no danger to anyone if it was infected with TB.

The farmer in the story sells raw milk which is why MPI has said he must stop. TB tests aren’t 100% reliable and there is a risk that another cow in the herd could have the disease and pass it on to people through milk unless it’s pasteurised.

The farmer isn’t without choices, he doesn’t have to kill his cows. He can’t keep selling raw milk but he could get it pasteurised. He could also sell the herd (although the cows will only be on movement control which means they can only be moved to another property owned by the farmer or to slaughter);  but that’s not what the headline suggests.


March 24 in history

24/03/2010

On March 24:

1401 Turko-Mongol emperor Timur sacked Damascus.

Timur reconstruction03.jpg

1603 James VI of Scotland also became James I King of England.

1731 Naturalization of Hieronimus de Salis Parliamentary Act was passed.

 

1765 The Britain passed the Quartering Act that required the Thirteen Colonies to house British troops.

1770 Kidnap victim, Ngati Kahu leader Ranginui, died on board the French ship Saint Jean Baptiste.

Ngati Kahu kidnap victim dies at sea on French ship

1820 Fanny Crosby, American hymnist, was born.

  

 1832 In Hiram, Ohio a group of men beat, tarred and feathered Mormon leader Joseph Smith, Jr..

Joseph Smith, Jr. portrait owned by Joseph Smith III.jpg

1834 William Morris, English writer and designer, was born.

1837 Canada gave African men the right to vote.

1878  HMS Eurydice sank, killing more than 300.

Victory at Trafalgar

1882 Robert Koch announced the discovery of the bacterium responsible for tuberculosis (mycobacterium tuberculosis).

1886 Athenagoras I, Greek Patriarch of Constantinople, was born.

 

1900 New York City Mayor Robert Anderson Van Wyck broke ground for a new underground “Rapid Transit Railroad” that would link Manhattan and Brooklyn.

1907 The first issue of the Georgian Bolshevik newspaper Dro was published.

1923 Greece becomes a republic.

1930 Steve McQueen, American actor, was born.

 

1934 U.S. Congress passed the Tydings-McDuffie Act allowing the Philippines to become a self-governing commonwealth.

1944 Ardeatine Massacre: German troops killed 335 Italian civilians in Rome.

 

1944  In an event later dramatized in the movie The Great Escape, 76 prisoners begin breaking out of Stalag Luft III.

 

1947  Christine Gregoire, American politician, current governor of Washington, was born.

1949 Nick Lowe, British musician, was born.

1951 Tommy Hilfiger, American fashion designer, was born.

1959 The Party of the African Federation (PFA) was launched by Léopold Sédar Senghor and Modibo Keita.

1965 NASA spacecraft Ranger 9, equipped to convert its signals into a form suitable for showing on domestic television, brought images of the Moon into ordinary homes before crash landing.

Ranger 9
 

1970 Sharon Corr, Irish musician (The Corrs), was born.

1972 The United Kingdom imposed “Direct Rule” over Northern Ireland.

1973 Kenyan track runner Kip Keino defeated Jim Ryun at the first-ever professional track meet in Los Angeles, California.

1976 Argentina’s military forces deposed president Isabel Perón and start the National Reorganization Process.

1976 A general strike took place in the People’s Republic of Congo

1980 Archbishop Óscar Romero was killed while celebrating Mass in San Salvador.

1986 The Loscoe gas explosion ledto new UK laws on landfill gas migration and gas protection on landfill sites.

1989 Exxon Valdez oil spill: In Prince William Sound in Alaska, the Exxon Valdez spilt 240,000 barrels (42,000 m³) of petroleum after running aground.

 

1990 Keisha Castle-Hughes, Australian/New Zealand actress, was born.

1998 Jonesboro massacre: two students, ages 11 and 13, fired upon teachers and students at Westside Middle School in Jonesboro, Arkansas; five people were killed and ten were wounded.

1998 A tornado swept through Dantan in India killing 250 people and injuring 3000 others.

1999 Kosovo War: NATO commenced air bombardment against Yugoslavia, marking the first time NATO has attacked a sovereign country.

1999 – Mont Blanc Tunnel Fire: 39 people died when a Belgian transport truck carrying flour and margarine caught fire in the Mont Blanc Tunnel.

 

2003 The Arab League voted 21-1 in favor of a resolution demanding the immediate and unconditional removal of US and British soldiers from Iraq.

2008 Bhutan officially became a democracy, with its first ever general election.

Jigme Thinley.jpg Sangay Ngedup 2005.jpg  
  Jigme Thinley Sangay Ngedup

Sourced from NZ History Online & Wikipedia


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