Rural round-up

16/01/2015

Goodman Fielder to commercialise three new products with health benefits – Fiona Rotherham:

(BusinessDesk) – Goodman Fielder, the food ingredients manufacturer facing a takeover from Wilmar International and First Pacific Co, will commercialise three new food products this year with health benefits for consumers – the first of a pipeline of innovation into smart foods.

The three patented products include a new baking product with enhanced health properties and two dairy products with improved sensory and health attributes, the company said in a statement.

Goodman Fielder research and innovation senior manager Shantanu Das said he couldn’t say more about the products at this stage other than they should reach shop shelves in the next 12 months and “the public will judge for themselves”. . .

 

Sanford Welcomes Efforts of New Zealand Authorities to Stop Illegal Fishing:

As one of only two New Zealand companies permitted to source toothfish from the Ross Sea fishery, Sanford  welcomes the current efforts of the New Zealand Government, Navy and other New Zealand agencies to fight illegal fishing in the waters of Antarctica.

This week the HMNZS WELLINGTON intercepted three vessels fishing illegally in the Southern Ocean. Two of the vessels refused to allow New Zealand Navy personnel to board despite their flag states granting approval.

“Illegal fishing poses many dangers, not only for the environment and fish stocks, but also for responsible licensed crew and vessels that may be called upon to assist in the search and rescue of these rogue operators when they get into trouble operating in these remote and isolated areas,” says Greg Johansson, Sanford’s Chief Operations Officer. . .

 Criticism of Navy over illegal fishing operation unjustified:

Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says ill-informed criticism of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s operation involving illegal fishing in the Southern Ocean ignores the success of the operation.

“The offshore patrol vessel Wellington and its crew have done a very good job in very challenging conditions in the Southern Ocean.

“They have successfully located, tracked and intercepted these vessels, and obtained the necessary evidence and documentation to enable further enforcement steps to be taken by the appropriate authorities. . .

Hydroponic herb business ‘never stops’ – Sue O’Dowd:

Even though summertime is salad time, the seasons make little difference to a vast North Taranaki hydroponic herb growing operation, as Sue O’Dowd discovers.

 All year round, herbs and assorted young salad greens fly out the door of a North Taranaki glasshouse to restaurants and supermarket shelves around New Zealand.

Natural Fare has created a nationwide reputation for the quality and flavour of its produce since Russell and Jan Jordan set up the business at Bell Block in the early 1980s.

New Plymouth Fresha owner Stephen Shaw, who has 20 years international experience as a chef, said that without doubt Jordan’s products were world-class. Not only were Natural Fare herbs fresh, each leaf in his mesclun mix had its own distinct flavour. . .

Taranaki dairy cow numbers on the rise – Sue O’Dowd:

Dairy cows in Taranaki have increased by more than 10 per cent the last 20 years as herd numbers have fallen almost a third.

Latest figures from DairyNZ put the number of cows in the province in 2013-14 at just over 493,000 in 1719 herds, about 54,500 more than the 1992-93 season when there were 2587 herds.

Taranaki farmers own 10 per cent of the country’s dairy cows and 14 per cent of herds.

At nearly 175,000ha, the amount of land used for dairy farming in Taranaki was slightly more in 1992-93 than in 2013-14 when it was just over 173,000ha. The current figure represents 10 per cent of the land used for dairy farming in New Zealand. . .

Historic multi-peril payouts – Gregor Heard:

AUSTRALIAN farmers are set to receive what are believed to be the first substantial payouts for multi-peril crop insurance (MPCI) within days.

Chief executive of Latevo International Andrew Trotter said his company had been told by its reinsurer that it would be paid for its first three claims and was currently finalising the formalities for payment to proceed.

He said he hoped it would be the final step towards widespread farmer acceptance of MPCI. . .

 


Rural round-up

10/08/2013

Fonterra Confirms No Health Risk with High School Project:

Fonterra today confirmed that there is no health risk to students at Palmerston North Girls’ High School who drank drinks that included whey protein concentrate (WPC80) from a batch subsequently subject to the recent precautionary recall.

Fonterra visited the school today to work with the principal and teachers as they informed students and parents about the whey protein concentrate provided to the school. The Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health have also been involved in supporting the school.

Fonterra Chief Technology Officer Dr Jeremy Hill said Fonterra established last night that a small portion of some potentially affected whey protein concentrate was provided to the school in February 2013. . .

Landcorp 2013 profit probably higher than forecast as it mitigates drought impact – Tina Morrison:

Landcorp Farming, New Zealand’s biggest farmer, says earnings may be a smidgen higher than first budgeted after initially thinking it may only breakeven this year when drought hit milk production and livestock price.

Net operating profit was probably $13 million in the year ended June 30, compared with its original budget of $12.7 million and down from $27 million the year earlier, state-owned Landcorp said in a statement

In January, the company, which operates 119 properties, cut its earnings expectations to between $6 million and $8 million and in March said it may only breakeven as the worst drought in 70 years crimped production and hit prices. . . .

New salmon farms get the go ahead:

New Zealand King Salmon got the go ahead yesterday for four new salmon farms in the Marlborough Sounds, when two appeals to the High Court were completely dismissed.

New Zealand King Salmon CEO Grant Rosewarne says he and his team are extremely relieved. He says “I am hugely proud of my team, and their absolute commitment through what has been an exhausting process. But we’re very excited and eager to get on with the business of producing the world’s best salmon”.

Once operational, the four new farms will create about 200 new jobs in the Top of the South, and benefits will start to flow through wages and additional work for local suppliers such as water taxis, engineering firms, transport companies and local shops. . .

Government welcomes King Salmon decision:

Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith and Primary Industries Minister Nathan Guy have welcomed the High Court’s decision to dismiss two appeals on the Board of Inquiry’s approval for New Zealand King Salmon to develop new marine farms in the Marlborough Sounds.

The decision of the Board of Inquiry, reached in February 2011, to approve four new salmon farming sites in the Marlborough Sounds was appealed by two parties and that appeal was heard at the High Court in Blenheim in May.

“The impacts of these new marine farms on the important recreation and conservation values of the Marlborough Sounds are small. This is about use of only six hectares of more than 100,000 hectares of water space in the Sounds,” Dr Smith says. . .

Sanford to miss forecast on lower skipjack tuna, toothfish and mussel harvest – Tina Morrison:

Sanford, New Zealand’s largest listed fishing company, said annual profit will fall short of its forecast after lower catches of skipjack tuna and toothfish and slow growth in its main Marlborough mussel growing area. The shares fell.

Profit will probably be $23 million to $25 million in the year ending Sept. 30, from $21 million last year, the Auckland-based company said in a statement. That’s less than Sanford forecast in May when it said second half profit would probably match the $14 million posted in the first half.

Sanford profits are being crimped as it faces high costs of operating its vessels while its catches fail to meet expectations in the Pacific skipjack tuna fishery and for toothfish in the remote South Georgia fishing zone. Slower growth in Marlborough mussels means those that are able to be harvested are generally smaller, resulting in lower revenue per kilogram and increased production costs. . .

Long haul to first consent for water scheme:

The company driving a large-scale irrigation and water storage scheme in North Canterbury hopes to have the initial stage operating in two or three years, now that it has got its first resource consent.

The $400 million scheme will take water mainly from the Hurunui River to irrigate up to 60,000 hectares of land on several hundred properties extending from north of the river to the coast. A series of dams will be built on a tributary of the Hurunui, the Waitohi, for water storage as well as hydro power.

Project manager Amanda Loeffen says it has been a long haul to get the first consent; initially the scheme wasn’t supported by everybody, and after a year and a half of discussions it has been completely redesigned. . .

Pins Colt Attracts Top Price at South Island Sale:

A striking colt by top-drawer stallion Pins has topped the New Zealand Bloodstock South Island Sale of Two-Year-Olds and Mixed Bloodstock, knocked down for $50,000.

Presented at Lot 29 from the draft of Phoenix Park, the colt is out of the 2005/06 New Zealand Bloodstock Southern Filly of the Year Series winner Ombre Rose and is bred on the Waikato Stud cross of Pins over O’Reilly that has proven successful in the past.

The hammer fell in favour of Joe Barnes of J & I Bloodstock Ltd, with the colt’s racing future likely to be in Hong Kong. . .


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