Rural round-up

09/08/2020

Difficult but the right call – Sudesh Kissun:

DairyNZ chief executive Dr Tim Mackle says the joint decision three years ago to eradicate Mycoplamsa bovis was a difficult call. However, Mackle says the 10-year eradication plan, while difficult, was the best option for farmers and the economy. He made the comments to mark three years since the bacterial disease was first detected in New Zealand. The discovery shocked the industry and triggered one of New Zealand’s largest ever biosecurity responses.  . .

Farmers missing out on newer technology – Mark Ross:

Ineffective regulation is leading to farmers and growers missing out on products that will increase their productivity and be safer to use.

The Government launched a bold plan to boost primary sector export earnings by $44 billion over the next decade, while protecting the environment and growing jobs.

The plan, launched last month, involves a 10-year roadmap to unlock greater value for a sector vital to New Zealand’s economic recovery.

As the Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor pointed out, there is huge potential in the roadmap, but it can only be achieved through a close government partnership with industry and Māori. . . 

Lamb weight not demand driving price – Annette Scott:

South Island lamb supply is tight but while seasonal procurement pressure may be enough to see marginal price lifts in some regions, weak export markets are keeping a cap on prices.

Alliance Group key account manager Murray Behrent said while procurement pressure may appear to be at fever pitch around the saleyards, the difference in pricing is the weight of the lambs.

Agents around Canterbury saleyards are reporting strong demand is driving prime lamb values with top prices at Temuka and Coalgate this week, fetching $194 and $198 respectively. . . 

Council exploring water storage sites – Colin Williscroft:

Hawke’s Bay Regional Council is actively investigating freshwater storage sites to carry excess winter water through to dry periods in summer.

It’s part of a four-pronged regional water security programme, supported by the Provincial Growth Fund, which includes a region-wide freshwater assessment, a 3D aquifer mapping project, and exploring viable locations for small-scale community storage schemes in the Central Hawke’s Bay (Tukituki River) and Heretaunga (Ngaruroro River) catchments.

Council acting manager regional water security Tom Skerman says the regional water assessment is analysing water supply and demand across the region to 2050. . . .

Tarras no stranger to the sly land-buyer transaction – Mark Price:

Before international airports became the talk of Tarras, farming was the district’s main preoccupation. In all its guises, farming has stamped its mark on the district and its people over 162 years. Mark Price takes a look at what has happened to Tarras in the days since its potential for farming was first realised.

Christchurch International Airport Ltd caught plenty of flak for the way it bought up land at Tarras for an airport.

Its agents, while making offers to landowners, did not disclose who they were working for, or why the land was wanted.

The airport’s chief executive, Malcolm Johns, was the man who orchestrated the purchase of 750ha for an airport, at a cost of $45 million.

He saw the potential, acted swiftly and quietly and came up last month, holding the deeds to the various farming properties. . . 

Broadacre farmers have their own fire experience – Mal Peters:

Reinforcing farmers’ perceptions the Rural Fire Service is a Sydney-centric bureaucracy, northern NSW broadacre farmers are scratching their heads at the declaration of a bushfire danger period on August 1.

Grass burns poorly in winter, so most of us are waiting for warmer weather.

We can get a permit to burn, but that only adds to our daily mountain of red tape.

Given recent megafires you’d think the RFS would make it easier to conduct controlled burns. . . 


Rural round-up

02/11/2015

Dairy prices, lamb returns drive optimism – Dene Mackenzie:

Some encouraging signs have emerged from the latest ASB Farmshed Economics report with dairy markets moving back towards normal and lamb a quiet achiever.

ASB chief economist Nick Tuffley said dairy farmers had reined in production to better reflect current demand, reducing oversupply.

Dairy prices reflected the better balance. Overall prices had lifted more than 50% and whole milk prices more than 70% since August. However, supply and prices still had more work to do. . . 

Prestigious Nuffield scholars for 2016 named – Gerard Hutching:

Four young primary sector leaders have been awarded prestigious Nuffield scholarships.

In the 60 years since the scholarship programme began, more than 140 New Zealanders have been handed the opportunity to travel and study at first-hand the latest international primary sector developments.

The scholars for 2016 are Wellington-based government agriculture development manager Jessica Bensemann, Te Puke dairy farmer Richard Fowler, environmental management adviser turned Central Hawke’s Bay shepherd Samuel Lang and orchard and sheep and beef farm owner Tom Skerman, from Hastings. . . 

Fonterra reaped 25% gain from Bega shares driven to record by Blackmores tie-up – Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group reaped a 25 percent gross gain on its two-year investment in Australia’s Bega Cheese shares, which jumped to a record last week after announcing a partnership with Blackmores that will compete with the New Zealand dairy exporter in China’s infant formula market.

Fonterra spent about A$60.7 million to build a 9 percent stake in Bega in November 2013, which it sold last week for A$74 million. It also received about A$1.6 million of dividends. Fonterra is in the process of transforming its Australian business, having taken a $108 million writedown of its yoghurt and dairy desserts assets across the Tasman in 2015. The gain on the Bega shares compares to a 5 percent return on capital from its Oceania consumer and food service business in 2015.

The sale wouldn’t affect Fonterra’s commercial relationship with Bega, which includes a licence on the Bega brand and a supply contract for cheese, said chief financial officer Lukas Paravicini. The sale was the best use of the capital, he said. . . .

Could drones, apps and electrical tape measures feature in the future of the horticultural industry?:

Kiwi ingenuity is alive and well and at its cutting edge best in the local horticultural industry as some startlingly innovative ideas – featuring everything from apps to drones – have begun to emerge from the innovation leg of this year’s Young Horticulturist of the Year Competition’.

The finalists, five young men and one woman, come from all over New Zealand – all winners of their individual sector competitions – and are going head to head to decide who will be named ‘Young Horticulturist of the Year 2015’ after the grand final, which is held over the two days of November 11 and 12 at the Auckland Botanic Gardens in Manurewa. . . .

Voting for the 2015 Fonterra Elections Underway:

Voting is now open for the 2015 Fonterra Board of Directors’ Elections and the Shareholders’ Councillor Elections in four wards.

This year there are six candidates standing for the Board of Directors. They are Murray Beach, Greg Maughan, Blue Read, Nicola Shadbolt, Ashley Waugh and John Wilson.

Fonterra shareholders have the opportunity to meet and ask questions of the Director candidates at the eleven Directors’ Election Candidate Roadshow meetings which run from Sunday, 8 November to Friday, 13 November 2015. . . .

Increased rebate for DMS’ growers:

Bay of Plenty Kiwifruit management company, DMS, has announced it has increased its shareholder rebate for the 2015/2016 year by 10 cents to 30 cents for Grower shareholders, an increase that is attributed to increased profitability of the business.

DMS is a Bay of Plenty owned and operated orchard management and post-harvest operator, with two major packhouse sites in Te Puke and Te Puna.

DMS Director, Craig Greenlees, says the rebate increase demonstrates the recent growth enjoyed by DMS, plus implementing strategies that focuses on fruit quality from orchard management to packing. . . 

Conservation Week 2015: Healthy Nature, Healthy People:

Conservation Week 2015 is a chance to get active outdoors and look after New Zealand’s natural world, Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says.

“The theme for 2015 is ‘Healthy Nature, Healthy People’ and it’s about the link between looking after our special natural places and the tangible health benefits you can enjoy from experiencing them.”

“We want New Zealanders to get out into our conservation land, whether it’s for exercise, relaxation, getting away from it all or helping out with one of the hundreds of different groups doing great work to protect our natural heritage.” . . .


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