Rural round-up

December 10, 2014

Tasman dam plan put on hold:

Plans to build a dam in the Tasman District are being put on the backburner after a new report recommends that neither of the two proposed funding models for the project should be adopted.

A consultation period, followed by a series of public meetings and hearings has been held in recent weeks, with nearly 800 submissions received on the Waimea Community dam in the Lee Valley.

There has been fierce opposition to the two funding models, which called for 30 percent of the $80 million cost to be met by ratepayers. . .

Fonterra shifts ‘silo’ culture since WPC food scare – Fiona Rotherham:

 (BusinessDesk) – Fonterra Cooperative Group claims to have made significant progress on the entrenched “silo” mentality it was criticised for in the government’s final report into last year’s whey protein contamination scare.

Stage two of the government inquiry into the WPC80 recall has recommended the Ministry for Primary Industries beef up its ability to manage food safety, including statutory powers to force companies to disclose relevant information that could then be handed over to other affected parties.

Fonterra was caught up in a false food scare last year when it quarantined several batches of WPC amid fears it was contaminated with a potentially dangerous form of the clostridium bacteria, though was ultimately cleared as a false alarm. . .

Profit and food safety ‘top priorities’ – James Small:

Profit and food safety are a “balancing act”, said Chris Lewis, Federated Farmers Waikato president.

Earlier this year, Fonterra was fined $300,000 for an incident, which saw milk-products pulled off shelves when it emerged they were potentially contaminated with Botulism. 

The last of a series of independent reports was released today, and the inquiry, led by Queen’s Counsel Miriam Dean, found a number of errors were made. 

While food-safety protocols were in place, the culture of care around food safety had not been fostered.

“Its an everyday thing for farmers and also for Fonterra,” Lewis said. . .

Infant formula body welcomes inquiry report:

The Infant Nutrition Council (INC) welcomes the final report of the independent inquiry into last year’s whey protein concentrate incident, says Infant Nutrition Council Chief Executive Jan Carey.

INC represents marketers and manufacturers of infant formula.

“We are particularly pleased that the Government will be accepting all of the inquiry’s recommendations. In fact, many were already well advanced ahead of this report.

“If this inquiry has done nothing else it has shown very clearly that New Zealand has food safety standards that are as good, if not better, as any country in the world. . .

 

Confidence in Lawson’s Dry Hills Prompts Long Term Investors to Purchase Majority Shareholding:

The future of one of Marlborough’s leading wine producers is looking particularly rosy. Strong confidence in the quality and potential of Lawson’s Dry Hills, a pioneer of the Marlborough wine industry, has enticed two of the company’s long-term partners to invest further in the company.

After a 15 year involvement, investors Tim and Pauline Evill have purchased additional shares previously owned by the Lawson family, so as to take a majority interest. Key members of the management team have also shown their backing for the company: Sion Barnsley, General Manager for five years and Business Manager prior to that has increased his shareholding, while Chief Winemaker of eleven years, Marcus Wright and newly appointed Sales and Marketing Manager, Derek Lilley have also invested to become new shareholders. . .

 Airborne National Honey Week Returns in 2015 to Celebrate New Zealand’s Sweetest Natural Resource:

The Airborne National Honey Week is back for a second year in March 2015. Tying in with the end of the New Zealand honey season, it will be a celebration of the country’s sweetest natural resource, with a particular emphasis on the versatility, quality and uniqueness of New Zealand’s honey types.

Among other activities, public tastings around the country will give Kiwis the opportunity to taste the eight main varieties of New Zealand single flower honey types – from Kamahi and Clover to Manuka and Honeydew. Airborne Honey is also launching a nationwide honey challenge, inviting Kiwis to choose and share their favourite via social media. There are prizes on offer for those that share their top honey and use the hashtag: #NZHoneyWeek. Airborne Honey will be giving away a pack of six different premium monofloral honeys every day for two weeks starting onTuesday 17 March.

 


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