Rural round-up

December 4, 2012

Strong growth and sophistication of the hospitality sector helps Neat Meat transform product offerings with unique pasture-based products, and build exports based on that success –  Andrew Patterson:

Not all meats are created equal, particularly if the Gisborne born Eriksen brothers are involved.

The three siblings Simon, William and Tim along with two other founding shareholders have been slowly redefining the meat category over the past decade with high end product offerings designed to cater to an increasingly sophisticated palate.

Their Neat Meat retail shops along with their Harmony and Angus brands and their Chefs Series range have given customers access to high quality cuts of meat in a variety of forms that were previously only the domain of exporters and high end restaurants. . . .

Dairy export volumes show large increase:

In the September 2012 quarter, seasonally adjusted dairy export volumes rose 32 percent, Statistics New Zealand said today. Milk powder was the largest contributor to this rise.

Dairy products made the largest contribution to a 9.7 percent rise in seasonally adjusted export volumes. Meat export volumes rose 15 percent. Import volumes rose 0.7 percent, led by intermediate and capital goods.

“Dairy export volumes are at record levels, after adjusting for seasonal effects,” prices manager Chris Pike said. “Dairy values remain at high levels, even though export prices have fallen for five consecutive quarters.” . . .

Primary Growth Partnership tops $650M:

Primary Industries Minister David Carter has welcomed the announcement of another successful Primary Growth Partnership bid which lifts the total invested to more than $650 million.

The Primary Growth Partnership (PGP) is to fund half of an $87 million innovation programme proposed by leading meat exporter ANZCO.

“ANZCO’s proposal to generate more value from the beef carcase with its Foodplus programme is bold and innovative. This is exactly what PGP is about – transforming great ideas into tangible R&D programmes focussed on results,” says Mr Carter. . .

Central Otago’s Trophy Triumphs:

2012 will go down as the year Central Otago firmly established its reputation as a producer of fine New Zealand wines, if the recent Trophy count is anything to go by.

Almost every winegrowing district within the Central Otago region has brought home a Trophy in the last six months – from Bendigo, to Alexandra, to Gibbston, to Wanaka, to Bannockburn – confirming every district within the region produces outstanding wines. . .

The Artisan Winegrowers of Central Otago:

In a more that signals the changing and evolving climate of the New Zealand wine industry, six modest growers from Central Otago – the eponymous “Artisans” – have banded together and formed their own group under a unified flag. The Artisan Winegrowers of Central Otago (AWCO) comprise Auburn Wines, Ellero, Georgetown Vineyard, Lindis River, Lowburn Ferry and TOSQ . . .

More than 400 Earlybirds in Dairy Awards

A record 158 entries received last week in the 2013 New Zealand Dairy Industry Awards has pushed the number of entrants eligible for the earlybird entry prize draw to 428.

“It was an amazing week,” National convenor Chris Keeping says. “We had a record 158 entries and on the last day for people to enter and be eligible for the earlybird entry prize draw we had 49 entries alone!”

Mrs Keeping says the number is up from 381 at the same time last year. . .

And for your entertainment (hat tip: Whaleoil) click on the video at GEA Farm Technologies  for jiving cows.


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