Penno & Rowath Feds Agribusiness winners

July 4, 2009

Dr John Penno, chief executive of Synlait is the winner of Federated Farmers’ inaugural Agribusiness Person of the Year Award.

The inaugural Agribusiness Personality of the Year title went to Professor Jacqueline Rowath of Massey University.

Feederated Farmers president Don Nicolson said:

“Dr Penno has been described as a ‘milk maverick’ but is Federated Farmers kind of maverick.  Synlait’s business model is revolutionary as it controls supply from the grass right through to finished product.

“Just as impressive is Professor Jacqueline Rowarth, Federated Farmers first Agricultural Personality of the Year. If you could bottle intellect, passion, dedication and charm, Massey University’s Professor Rowarth has it all and much more beside.

“As Director of Agriculture, Professor Rowarth is an inspiration to students and to farmers.  Quite simply put, she ought to be on television with her upbeat and positive conviction that agriculture is an overwhelming force for good,” Mr Nicolson concluded.

The Agribusiness Person of the Year was sponsored by gen-I and the Personality title was sponsored by Ravensdown.

Recognising agribusiness achievement and personality in this way is a great idea from Feds.

This is Penno’s second award in a week. He was one of seven people awarded Sir Peter Blake leadership awards. The Bull Pen has more on that here.


Bloke behind bird song bags Old Blue

June 26, 2009

Wildlife film maker and sound recorder John Kendrick, the man who initiated National Radio’s bird calls has been awarded an Old Blue.

That’s the Forest and Bird Society’s highest award.

Sean Plunket’s interviewed him on Morning Report today.

Philippa Stevenson has more information, inclduing a photo of the kokako which Kendrick says has his favourite bird song, at The Bull Pen.


MAF’s meat future

June 24, 2009

There’s a brighter future ahead for the sheep meat and beef industry a report into the sector by the Ministry of Agriculture found.

It drew on the views of people in the sector to look at opportunities and challenges in the next 10 to 15 years and concluded:

Despite the obvious challenges that the sector faces over the next 10 to 15 years, this study has identified a general positive slant to people’s perception of the industry’s future. It is clear though that this rosy outlook will not be achieved through inaction or simply “carrying on as normal”.  New Zealand has a comparative advantage across much of the value chain. Leadership, vision and action are required from the sector to ensure this comparative advantage delivers a successful and sustainable industry into the future.

 

One point everyone who thinks they have a solution for the meat industry overlooks is that it comprises many competing parts.

The processing sector alone includes co-operatives, private companies and public ones. No-one can impose anything on them and too much co-operation between them could risk attracting accusations of collusion.

 Fonterra was held up as a shining example of what the meat industry could aspire to, although I’m not so sure it’s regarded quite so highly now. But milk and meat are very different products.

Dairy farmers have to sign up for a season and their  milk has to be collected every day.

Sheep and beef farmers have more licence and more choice. That gives them a lot of power when there’s a lot of feed but can leave them in trouble in difficult seasons.

There isn’t an easy answer for the sector, especially when a decline in the sheep numbers has led to excess killing capacity.

But those looking for improvements should start by looking back because solutions which didn’t work in the past aren’t likely to work in the future either.

The Bull Pen has a related post on the report.


Did you see the one about . . .

May 30, 2009

Recessions don’t hurt everyone at The Visible Hand in Economics

The Wesleys 1 at Musty Moments (numbers 2 -6 are also funny) Hat Tip: found via My First Dictionary at Kiwiblog

Cow breeding 101  at Kismet Farm

A New Zealnder opened a bank account today  at Watching Brief

Wondering at Craft is the New Black

Conversation wiht Myself about Obesity at Dim Post

Road Code Politics at MacDoctor

10 feminist motherhood questions from Blue Milk at In A Strange Land

Sommat Better at The Bull Pen

Extra-Ordinary at Bowalley Road

In which my cake geekery reaches new levels at The Hand Mirror


Pigs in Muckraking – Updated & Updated again

May 18, 2009

When a television show gives only one side of a story, I wonder what the other side would say.

I don’t know enough to comment on the issues of pig farming which were raised in last night’s Sunday programme but Farmgirl is better informed and brings some balance to the story.

Good journalism requires balance. Sunday should have given the farmers an opportunity to give their side of the story and it would have helped to have a vet’s point of view too.

There are no excuses for mistreating animals and saying it happens elsewhere is no excuse for cruelty. But nothing is gained for animal welfare if the pork industry here is killed and replaced by meat from overseas where pig farming practices are no better and possibly even worse.

UPDATE:

Minister of Agriculture David Carter has asked animal campaigners to reveal the location of the pig farm shown on Sunday.

“If SAFE has the welfare of these animals at heart, it needs to provide details of the property today so the authorities can the take appropriate action.  I have asked MAF to undertake an inspection as soon as we know the farm’s location,” Mr Carter said.

That is a very sensible response because MAF can’t do anything until they know where the property is.

It raises the question of why SAFE hasn’t already gone to the authorities and any further delay in doing so would suggest they care more about publicity for their campaign than the welfare of the pigs.

UPDATE 2: The Bull Pen has more with King hit on pig farming.

UPDATE 2: Keeping Stock posts on SAFE pork , highlighting a story from the NZ Herald which says SAFE is refusing to identify the farm.

When asked by nzherald.co.nz if that was due to publicity, Mr Kriek said yes.

I’m not going to give you all the details of our strategy, which is a very sound one,” Mr Kriek said.

The organisation which is supposed to save animals from exploitation is exploiting animals by putting publicity before the pigs.


Carter questions court action – Updated

May 15, 2009

Agriculture Minister David Carter is questioning Fish & Game’s leadership  after its failed attempt to gain public access to pastoral lease land.

“I seriously question the use of hunting and fishing licensing fees in taking this action, and I will be discussing this further with the Minister of Conservation.

“I am concerned this divisive action was taken when there was no foundation for Fish and Game’s claim for greater public access to high country stations.

“A pastoral lease gives the runholder the right to say who has access to their leasehold land. This is no different from private property owners,” says Mr Carter.

“The fundamental duty of Fish and Game is to advocate for hunters and fishers, and to help enhance their relationship with rural landowners. . . “

How refreshing to have a Minister who stands up for farmers and rightly questions whether Fish and Game should be using licence fees for its political and litigious campaigns.

Anecdotal evidence from hunters and fishers suggest the Minister is more in touch with their concerns than the body their licence fees funds.

This misguided court action was expensive for licence holders, tax payers and farmers and it’s not just money but goodwill that was wasted.

UPDATE:

Federated Farmers said the court action was a disaster:

The challenge was a failed attempt to by-pass all the work associated with walking access and it is a spiteful and damaging waste of the fishing and hunting license fee money. . .

“This decision brings relief for affected High Country farming families, as they now know Fish & Game members won’t be entitled to walk all over them,” says Donald Aubrey, Federated Farmers High Country chairman.

Both Federated Farmers and the High Country Accord played an instrumental role in the formation and development of the Walking Access Commission.

“We have contributed positively to the development of rules for public access that give pastoral leaseholders and their families security and certainty. Meanwhile, Fish & Game’s Executive has sadly played nothing but a negative and destructive role. . .

“High Country pastoral leases impose strict conditions on us as farmers. The judgment acknowledges that leaseholders are responsible for much more than just grass.

“It’s only right that farmers have the ability to control and manage access to such land. This decision enables pastoral leaseholders to operate a business and maintain authority over their property rights contained in their leases. 

“The High Court’s judgement also recognises that pastoral leaseholders perform a stewardship role. In other words, we farm with the High Country and not against it. . .

“Fish & Game chief executive, Bryce Johnston, now needs to take a long hard long look at his and his Council’s decision to waste a vast amount of license fee money on this challenge.

“Federated Farmers consider it also time for the Government to look at the legislative privilege that enables Fish & Game to fund such frivolous litigation. This inappropriate use of license fee money should not go unchecked by Government,” Mr Aubrey concluded.

High Country Accord chair Jonathon Wallis issued a media release in which he asked if the action was a misuse of funds.

“Not just the huge amount of money farmers have been forced to direct into these proceedings away from rejuvenating our economy through expanding and maintaining agricultural production, but both the vast amount of tax payer funds that went into jointly defending it and the allocation of precious funds more commonly used for the protection and establishment of habitat for our fish and game.”

“The latter are funds generated by the sale of Fish and Game licenses sold to hunters and anglers who for almost a century have respected the goodwill and relationships established between farmers and recreationalists regardless of it being a matter of privilege as opposed to right.”

“The question also has to be asked whether this was not just a personal crusade by an executive distorted from the opinion of the general membership of Fish and Game itself.”

Wallis said he allowed licensed duck shooters on to his property on opening morning because he wasn’t blaming them for the actions of the national council.

Alf Grumble and The Bull Pen also post on the issue.


Talk about laugh, Trev

April 1, 2009

Well those who got the April Fools Day jokes laughed, others – like the friend who walked up six flights of stairs because she believed the sign that said the lift would be out of action until noon – weren’t so amused.

The Bull Pen reported wired muso-farmers stage come back

Interest.Co found NZ economists revert to busking to replace bonuses

Bits on the Side spottted you April Fool tube

Kiwiblog  contributed to an outbreak in raised blood perssure – and got mentions on Newztalk ZB  & RadioNZ with National to Appoint Cullen as Reserve Bank Governor

Whaleoil announced Worth to be sacked, Brash to stand in Mt Albert  and found out he had fans when he said that’s it

At Frogblog Greens went off-road off site, then decided to ban the Easter bunny  and invited Winston on board

TV3 reports big business adopts April Fools Day as its own

And it wasn’t an April Fools joke – but someone was having a laugh at the expense of a couple of Labour MPs when they set up Twitter accounts and registered as followers of Keeping Stock. 

If I missed one, please leave a link in comments.


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