Happy headlines

October 17, 2011

ODT – All Blacks muscle way into World Cup final

Too big, too strong and, most of all, just too damn    clinical. The All Blacks beat the Wallabies 20-6 in the World    Cup semifinal last night, and showed they have the muscle and    grunt to go with the renowned finesse in the side . . .

Southland Times – ABs trample over Aussies

France versus 4 million, the All Blacks have their date with destiny after surging into the Rugby World Cup final. . .

The Press – Screaming for All Black joy

After living through their city’s devastation, Christchurch residents could
finally scream for joy . . .

Dominion Post – All Blacks reward party faithful at fanzone

Clad in black, with faces painted in silver ferns, a crowd of thousands cheered the All Blacks to victory in Wellington’s fanzone last night . . .

NZ Herald – Epic All Blacks deliver on huge night

Yes we can and yes we did – in style . . .

And not so happy:

The Australian – Wallabies outplayed out smarted all blacked out

THE Wallabies’ World Cup campaign lies buried in the graveyard of Eden Park after they were bundled out of the tournament by the All Blacks last night . . .

Sydney Morning Herald – Great hope of rugby fumbles and bumbles when he was needed most

If that was Quade Cooper’s best game ever, as captain James Horwill fearlessly  declared it would be on match eve, then one can only wonder what  his worst has  been . . .

The Age –  Kiwis on the cusp after walloping Wallabies

AND yea, verily, it is written. Though long have our Kiwi cousins walked in the  shadow of the Valley of Death, through World Cup loss after World Cup loss, as  an entire people plumbed the depths of despair, now, now the hour is  upon them. The promised land is now just up ahead around the bend . . .

Peter FitzSimons gets full credit for graciousness in the last column.

 


Dream come true

December 3, 2008

 

dream

 

From The Australian


Wet nurses wanted in China

September 28, 2008

The Australian reports that wet nurses are cashing in  on the poisoned milk scandal in China.

MANY middle-class Chinese families already have a maid, or aiyi. Now they are rushing to hire a wet nurse, or nai ma, too, as anxiety surges about milk-powder poisoning.

Agencies throughout the country that routinely hire out domestic servants for house-cleaning, cooking and child minding, are now adding wet nurses as a new category.

In the wealthy southern city of Shenzhen, bordering Hong Kong, the Daily Sunshine newspaper said that rich families seeking wet nurses were prepared to pay $3150 a month – more than three times the average income.

One domestic services agency in Shenzhen has been receiving 50 calls a day from parents wanting wet nurses.

Manager Ai Xiaoxiong said: “We only had one or two such inquiries a year in the past.”

Most Chinese parents have in recent years been feeding their babies bottled milk, promoted as more nutritious and better for the mothers’ figures. But the panic over the safety of China’s dairy products, after four babies died and 53,000 were taken to hospital as a result of consuming milk contaminated by melamine, has changed attitudes overnight.

Yanhong Wheeler, a best-selling Chinese author on raising children, under the name Xiao Wu, said: “There are more than 400 nutrients in breast milk that no milk powder can imitate. But no melamine.”

Paying a wet nurse enables well-paid mothers to continue working more easily, as well as meeting the need for reliable milk for their children.

Mr Ai said that wet nurses’ pay had more than tripled following the milk disaster.

The rewards are attracting young women to become career wet nurses. The Shenzhen Daily spoke with a woman who was a department store sales person in Sichuan province, before she quit in order to give birth last month. Now she is already planning a new job as a wet nurse: “I have plenty of breast milk. Why not? It’s a very good offer, as I only made 2000 yuan before” – about $350 per month, a typical wage. Now she can afford to buy expensive imported milk powder for her own baby.

Zhongjia Housework Agency manager Zhang Guixui said that parents were focused on the wet nurse’s health, so her agency insisted on “a strict physical check on everything from HIV to skin diseases”. She knew a case where a wet nurse was required by the parents to drink only fresh chicken soup, made from birds air-freighted from overseas.

The World Health Organisation is opposed to any advertsing of breast-milk substitutes and this is adhered to in western countries. That baby formula has been promoted in China, and no doubt other countries, as better than breast milk is another scandal.

And what does is say about the desperate circumstances of a woman that she will breast feed someone else’s child yet put her own on forumula?


Promise less, prepare for worst

July 15, 2008

 SOMETIMES the best way to make voters forget their ills – real and imagined – is to promise them less and prepare them for the worst case.

If politicians followed the rule of the possible when talking to the public, they would be better able to sell reforms. Perhaps they could even keep the electorate on side in the event of recession.

This advice come from George Megalogenis, senior writer for The Australian and is applicable this side of the Tasman too.

Remember the shock of Paul Keating’s “recession we had to have” press conference in November 1990 came not from the news itself, but from the denial of reality that preceded it. The then treasurer had repeatedly said that there would be no recession.

Imagine, for a moment, that Australia’s luck finally runs out, and a recession that may be engulfing the US and Britain reaches our shores by the end of the year, or early in2009…

Obviously, Kevin Rudd won’t want to talk the local economy down when the chances of recession seem low. But how would he go about changing the national conversation if things suddenly went pear-shaped? The Prime Minister would, of course, blame the previous Coalition government, and the rest of the world, in that political order.

Yet the lesson of recessions past is that governments lose credibility long beforehand, by overselling their ability to run the economy. They claim credit for the positive numbers, then look for scapegoats when the national accounts throw up a couple of quarters of negative growth.

It is a little difficult to remain credible when you claim the credit for economic growth which largely happens in spite of your government then deny responsibility for a downturn which is happening, at least in part, because of your policies.

The truth, if any leader were prepared to admit it, is the role of government is limited when the economy is humming. Stay out of the way of the market, take the opportunity to secure reform because change is easier to implement in good times, and keep a lid on expectations. The last bit is always the hardest, because in good times leaders err on the side of the bribe.

That brings to mind interest free student loans and a variety of other baubles we tax payers are funding.

It is only in recession that governments are really called on to manage the economy. They provide the safety net for those who lose their jobs and the public investments to prop up demand.

Sadly, we are cursed with politicians who spruik their expertise when it is not required, and who dodge their responsibilities when systems and markets fail.

Who does that remind me of?

 

p.s. I had to look up Spruik so in case you don’t know what it means either here’s a couple of definitions:

From Encarta  – to promote goods services or a cause by addressing people in a public place;

And from Wordsmith – to make an elaborate speech, especially to attract customers.


Style vs Substance

June 25, 2008

If it wasn’t for the gender of the Prime Minister  this could be about New Zealand:

To a visitor from outer space, it would be hard to distinguish the job description of prime minister today from that of a talk show or game show host. The PM is a regular fixture on radio and television, where no topic is too small for him to discuss. He offers cash prizes to listeners and he sweats on the weekly ratings.

Sounds very familiar.

The lines between celebrity and politics blurred some time ago. Our leaders are more needy because their handlers have convinced them that if they miss a single news bulletin the public will soon forget them. But voters can just as easily project wisdom on to politicians who are silent as those who blather sweet platitudes about Australian values and the noble struggle of the working family.

This too could be about politics on this side of the Tasman.

Although it is tempting to see Rudd as merely the sum of his past lives as a Queensland bureaucrat and diplomat to China, his approach to federal office is, in a way, no different from Howard’s.

“The moment you start campaigning for the next election is today,” Howard told his partyroom at the first meeting after the Coalition’s 2004 election win.  I’m a great believer in perpetual campaigning.”

And this explains one of the problems with the many unexplaiend consequences of the Electoral Finance Act: it’s impossible to separate the role of an MP from campaigning because under the Act’s very broad definition so much of what an MP does could also be deemed to be campaigning.

This happens to be a worldwide trend. Tony Blair noted last June, just after leaving office, that a large part of his time as a British prime minister was spent “coping with the media, its sheer scale, weight and constant hyperactivity”. Blair measured the compression of the news cycle by the number of topics he ran a day: “When I fought the 1997 election we took an issue a day. In 2005, we had to have one for the morning, another for the afternoon and by the evening that agenda had already moved on.”

Thankfully, the Australian market is still small enough to keep Rudd to three issues a week rather than three a day.

It was not always thus. Remember when sit-down press conferences took precedence over the door stop and parliament was the place to announce big policies? The last government to practise politics the old-fashioned way was the Hawke-Keating regime between 1983 and 1996. To be fair, Howard’s administration began as Paul Keating’s ended, with a sense that the public was intelligent enough to handle a detailed policy debate over months and years, not hours and days.

The GST was Australia’s last old-school reform. Howard needed four years, from 1997 to 2001, to discuss, draft, amend and bed down the new tax system.

When was the last time the electorate was treated intelligently with prolonged discussion, drafting, amending and bedding down of policy here?

Under Rudd, Labor operates on the delusion that the electorate can absorb two or three earth-shattering announcements a week. Darting from topic to topic, like a shock jock or newspaper columnist, is why Howard lost the plot in his final year in office.

Has Rudd forgotten Howard’s increasingly hysterical public conversation of 2007: the Murray-Darling takeover, tax cuts, the Northern Territory intervention, a federal rescue of one hospital in a marginal seat in Tasmania and more tax cuts?

What really binds Nelson and Rudd is their mistaken belief in the 24/7 media cycle as an end in itself. The reason Blair and Bill Clinton have such dismal legacies in the deeper ponds of British and US politics is that they wasted too much time thinking of the next line instead of honing policy.

This is not a curse of either the Left or the Right. US Republican President George W. Bush followed the Democrat Clinton by devoting more time to crafting the headline for invading Iraq – weapons of mass destruction – than worrying about securing the peace afterwards.

The media has reduced politicians into thinking by the minute.

Or is it that politicians only think by the minute and so that’s all that’s left to report?

Think about the issues on which Rudd hopes to build a new reform consensus, from climate change to the Federation to the tax, welfare and retirement incomes systems. Rudd can’t win any of these debates by press release alone. He has to patiently explain himself again and again, one big idea at a time.

Patiently, explaining one big idea at a time? Could any of our politicians try that here – and if they did, would we do them the courtesy of listening to them and really thinking about what they were saying? Because if didn’t we would indeed get the politicians we deserve.


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