Rural round-up

22/09/2014

IrrigationNZ sees National’s re-election as opportunity to progress water infrastructure

IrrigationNZ congratulates the National Party on winning the 2014 general election.

“National’s re-election is an opportunity to develop the infrastructure New Zealand needs to provide surety of water for agriculture, town drinking water supply, waterways, recreational use and to future proof the country from climate change,” says Andrew Curtis, CEO of IrrigationNZ.

“The RMA reforms proposed by National will allow irrigation schemes to get up and running without further delay,” says Nicky Hyslop, IrrigationNZ acting Chair.

These schemes include Ruataniwha in the Hawke’s Bay, Hurunui in North Canterbury, Hunter Downs in South Canterbury and the Wairarapa. . .

Telford offers chance to pass on knowledge – Sally Rae:

Having worked in the dairy industries in both Africa and New Zealand, Justin Pigou says they are like ”chalk and cheese”.

Now dairy farm manager at Telford, a division of Lincoln University, in South Otago, Mr Pigou (50) is sharing his experiences in the industry.

Brought up in Zambia, he was from a farming background, which included beef, sheep, tobacco, cropping, maize and soya beans. . .

Glad he joined Young Farmers – Sally Rae:

Clinton Young Farmers Club president Andy Wells believes the skills he has learned through his involvement with the organisation will help him in the future. Photo supplied.

When Cantabrian Andy Wells (28) moved south to farm near Clinton, he thought joining Young Farmers might be a good way to meet people.

Not only had he since made ”a hell of a lot of friends” but he had also made a lot of useful connections.

The skills he gained through his involvement with the organisation would also stand him in good stead in the future, when he hoped to take on other roles in the agricultural sector. After studying environmental management at Lincoln University, Mr Wells headed overseas with a friend. . .

Synlait Milk full-year profit rises 70%, to take 25% stake in New Hope Nutritional – Jonathan Underhill:

 (BusinessDesk) – Synlait Milk, which twice cut its earnings forecast, posted earnings growth that met revised guidance and said it plans to take a 25 percent stake Sichuan New Hope Nutritional Foods Co to gain a direct interest in a Chinese infant formula brand.

Profit rose 70 percent to $19.6 million in the 12 months ended July 31, from $11.5 million a year earlier, the Rakaia-based company said in a statement. Sales rose 43 percent to $600 million.

Profit was within the guidance of between $17.5 million and $22.5 million Synlait gave in May, when it said earnings growth would be less than previously forecast because of a strong currency and an unfavourable product mix. Profit still met its prospective financial information (PFI) target. Its shares have fallen 16 percent this year as the NZX 50 Index gained 9 percent and last traded at $3.30, up from its $2.20 listing price last year. . .

Pomahaka catchment plan to manage water quality – Sally Rae,

Janet Gregory is passionate about both farming and the environment; a firm believer the two go ”hand-in-hand”.

One of the biggest challenges at the moment was the public perception of farming and its impact on water quality.

”So many people don’t think farmers care about their water and they do,” Mrs Gregory, who is NZ Landcare Trust Southland regional co-ordinator, said. . .

Primary ITO board member helping to shape the future of training in the arboricultural industry

For Primary ITO board member Richard Wanhill it took him a while to uncover his true passion.

“After school I went overseas, and when I came back to Auckland I started University. I studied a Bachelor of Science majoring in Geography and Geology. But I didn’t really feel it was for me and I dropped out after the first year”, Richard explains.

After almost two years with no real focus and living off the unemployment benefit, Richard spotted an ad in a local newspaper for a trainee arborist.

“I didn’t even know what an arborist was!” Richard laughs. “I had to look it up in the dictionary”.

It was that newspaper ad thay spurred Richard towards a career in arboriculture. . .


Rural round-up

21/03/2014

Maori dairy farm set to boost Northland’s economy:

Dairy cows will be led into Northland’s Rangihamama milking sheds for the first time officially this weekend, marking the first tangible example of the Government’s aim to increase regional economic development in Northland.

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) has been working with the Omapere Rangihamama Trust (ORT) to accelerate the Trust’s transformation of 278 hectares of Māori-owned land, from grazing to high-productivity dairy farming since 2012.

“Omapere Rangihamama Trust is a model for growing rural development by pulling together a vast number of stakeholders into a larger and more commercially effective operation,” says MPI’s Deputy Director-General Ben Dalton. . .

Simple fix touted for deadly quad bike problem – Jill Galloway:

A Wellington farmer who survived a quad bike accident says using a sash window weight on the front of a four-wheeler stops it turning over so easily.

Stuart Woodman said he was going up a steep slope when he hit a hole and his quad bike rolled over and landed on him.

“I was unconscious, and came to after I had got out from under the bike. I don’t know how I survived it. Thick skull, big bones – I don’t know.”

Woodman said he righted the bike on the slope, and it rolled down the hill.

“I picked the soil off it and finished mustering. Then I drove to hospital.” . . .

Farmer develops mussel shell fertiliser – Cathie Bell:

The enormous pile of old mussel shells near Havelock could become a lot smaller because of the landowners’ business venture turning it into fertiliser.

Bill Brownlee stores millions of shells from the Sanford mussel factory on his farm, on the Blenheim side of Havelock. He said the Marlborough District Council had estimated it as 13 metres high.

The pile started 50 years ago when his father took the shells, but had really grown in the past 15 years since mussel production boomed in the Sounds, he said.

He and wife Jane Brownlee bought a crusher from the Cape Campbell lime works and started a new venture, crushing the shells into a fine powder to be spread as fertiliser. . .

BOP Dairy Awards Winners All Career Changes:

Making the move to dairy farming has been hugely successful for the three major winners at the 2014 Bay of Plenty Dairy Industry Awards.

The 2014 Bay of Plenty Sharemilker/Equity Farmers of the Year, Brett and Natasha Grindrod, were both teachers, the Bay of Plenty Farm Managers of the Year, Thomas Blackett and Stacey Lepper, had engineering and technician careers, and Bay of Plenty Dairy Trainee of the Year, Cameron Luxton, was a builder. They all switched careers to dairy farming and were announced winners at the region’s awards dinner at Awakeri Events Centre last night (March 19).

Brett Grindrod says he took the opportunity to work on a dairy farm for a season and never looked back. “After a short time on farm I found I really enjoyed the career change, and did not want to return teaching. I enjoyed the flexibility that farming offered and could see the long term potential for growth. . .

Royal FrieslandCampina lifts stake in Synlait Milk to 9.999 percent buying shares at $3.85 apiece:

(BusinessDesk) – Royal FrieslandCampina has lifted its stake in Synlait Milk to 9.999 percent from 7.5 percent, adding to an investment that has gained 41 percent since its NZX debut last July.

The Netherlands-based cooperative bought about 3.66 million shares at $3.85 each yesterday, according to a statement to the NZX. The shares last traded at $3.87, having sold in Synlait’s initial public offering last year at $2.20 apiece.

The purchase puts the Dutch company, where the current Fonterra chief executive Theo Spierings was a senior executive until 2009, ahead of Japan’s Mitsui & Co, with an 8.4 percent holding, as the second-biggest shareholder in the Canterbury-based dairy processor. China’s Bright Dairy Food owns 39 percent, having been diluted during last year’s IPO. . .

Posted skulls pose biosecurity threat:

A box of South African animal skulls crawling with maggots never made it through the post, thanks to the work of vigilant Auckland biosecurity staff.

A Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) dog team recently detected the unusual biosecurity threat at the International Mail Centre near Auckland airport.

Once opened, the box revealed a number of wild animal skulls, thought to include zebra and wildebeest.

“There was clearly some flesh on the bones, as you could see maggots writhing beneath and on top of the cellophane wrapping,” says Aynsley Richards, MPI Auckland Team Leader, Border Clearance Services. . .

Gisborne figure elected to lead role in Eastern Fish & Game:

The Eastern Fish and Game Council has elected well known Gisborne identity Murray Ferris as its new chairman.

The Eastern Council represents over 30,000 anglers and 3000 game bird hunting licence holders.

As one of 12 Fish and Game councils, it is responsible for managing sports fish and game birds over a large central North Island area which runs from Wairoa, west to Mt Ruapehu, and then north to Waihi.

The Eastern Fish & Game Region has trout fisheries of national significance, including the heavily-used Rotorua Lakes, and popular Lake Waikaremoana and the Ruakituri River within its eastern boundaries. . .


Rural round-up

02/10/2013

Fonterra Confirms Dispute Resolution Process with Danone:

Fonterra today confirmed that it is in a dispute resolution process with Danone following the whey protein concentrate precautionary recall initiated in August this year.

The discussions between Fonterra and Danone had been confidential with a view to reaching a mutually acceptable commercial outcome however some aspects of these discussions have been made public this morning in the press.

Fonterra confirms that the discussions remain ongoing but strongly denies any legal liability to Danone in relation to the recall.

Wool Expo Shows the Way to ‘Rest in Fleece’:

A coffin, handbags, pet rugs and digitally printed fabrics made from wool are among exhibits that feature in Wool Expo 2013 that takes to the road this month.

A partnership between the Campaign for Wool, PGG Wrightson Wool, and Massey University’s College of Creative Arts, the expo begins in Gisborne in two weeks and works it’s way down the east of the north island to end in Masterton in the middle of November.

Some revolutionary and innovative woollen concepts are explored, exhibited and demonstrated in the expo that will be based in PGG Wrightson’s retail stores in the six centres where the road show stops.

A coffin made of wool is featured. The idea isn’t new – back in the 1600s, in a bid to bolster Britain’s textile industry the British parliament passed a law requiring all corpses to be buried in a woollen shroud. Spin forward to 2009 when a prototype and sturdier wool coffin led to the present version. . .

Speech to the Primary Growth Partnership expo – Nathan Guy:

. . . Innovation has been a hallmark of our primary industries for well over a century.

To become a world leader, the sector has always made great use of science, technology – and innovation.

Just consider the dramatic shift in the way the sector produces, processes, markets and transports food products compared to even a few decades ago.

For example, we now produce the same amount of sheep meat today as we did in the early 1980s but with around half the number of sheep.

The global food market of the 21st century is changing rapidly and there are great opportunities for our food sector, particularly in Asia. . .

Martyn Dunne welcomed as new MPI Director-General:

Federated Farmers is pleased to welcome Martyn Dunne CNZM as the new Director-General of the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI).

“Martyn Dunne brings a completely new dimension to the leadership of the MPI,” says Dr William Rolleston, Federated Farmers Vice-President.

“Mr Dunne brings a huge wealth of experience being New Zealand’s current High Commissioner in Canberra, the immediate past Comptroller of Customs and Chief Executive of the New Zealand Customs Service and before that, a Major-General in the New Zealand Army. . .

Federated Farmers builds talent with new appointments:

Federated Farmers policy resource is being built up by several new appointments including a new dedicated regional policy advisor to be based in its Invercargill office.

“Federated Farmers is serious about meeting the needs of our members and is investing is capability where it is needed,” says Conor English, Federated Farmers Chief Executive.

“We have excellent and well qualified staff and I am pleased to announce two new policy staff. . .

Farm with royal connections goes on the market:

A history-rich farm once visited by Prince Charles for a private day’s trout fishing has been placed on the market.

Macdonald’s Farm near Galatea in the Eastern Bay of Plenty is a sprawling 907 hectare sheep and beef breeding/finishing property. The Whirinaki River, which runs rich with rainbow and brown trout, is on the western boundary for the farm.

Prince Charles was flown into the farm during the royal family visit here in 1970 to celebrate the bicentennial discovery of New Zealand by Captain James Cook. . .

Synlait Milk supports AgResearch’s approach to campus development:

Canterbury milk nutrition company Synlait Milk is supportive of the investment by AgResearch in its campus infrastructure.

Synlait Milk Managing Director Dr John Penno says there is recognition of the growing importance of Canterbury as an agricultural powerhouse.

“Canterbury is New Zealand’s fastest growing milk supply region, with production growth at an average 11% per season for the last 12 seasons. We acknowledge the technical challenges this growth brings, in particular farmers ability to manage their environmental footprint. . .

New Zealand wine industry participates in national sustainability project:

The wine industry is the first to trial a new national environmental, economic and social performance Dashboard system.

Led by The Agribusiness Group Ltd and funded by government and industries, the $11 million New Zealand Sustainability Dashboard project will provide a sustainability assessment and reporting tool for the primary industry sectors.

The Dashboard project will deliver tools that provide farmers and growers with crucial information on the environmental, economic and social performance of their vineyards or farms.  Information from key performance indicators will be used to improve results in areas such as energy use, nitrogen loss, carbon footprint and maintenance of biodiversity. . .

Prestigious Awards Reflect Heritage for Johanneshof Cellars:

Another two Gold Medals and a Trophy for Johanneshof Cellars at the recent New Zealand International Wine Show held over the weekend, reinforces the opinion that this Boutique Winery is on a record breaking streak. Just six weeks ago Wine Makers Edel Everling and Warwick Foley were on the winners podium at the 2013 Spiegelau International Wine Competition, accepting four medals and 3 trophies, including joint ‘Champion Producer of the Show’.  This time the Johanneshof Cellars 2011 Noble Late Harvest Riesling and the 2012 Marlborough Gewürztraminer received Gold Medal honours with the Gewürztraminer being awarded overall Trophy.

How does this unique winery, nestled in a tiny valley on the outskirts of the seaport town of Picton on New Zealand’s South Island, continually have the spotlight shined on them? . . .

Prized Clayvin Vineyard signs lease with Giesen Wines:

One of the oldest and most prized vineyards in New Zealand, Clayvin Vineyard in Marlborough, has signed a long-term lease to Giesen Wines.

The coveted vineyard, which is more than 20 years old, covers 13.4ha in the sought after Wairau Valley, and has supplied grapes for a string of award-winning wines over the years. Developed in 1991, Clayvin was Marlborough’s first commercial hillside vineyard.

Wholly organic, the block comprises 7.8ha of Pinot Noir vines, 3.36ha of Chardonnay, 1ha of Syrah, and another hectare of younger Sauvignon Blanc vines that are not yet in production. . .

Cloudy Bay 2013 Sauvignon Blanc Released Worldwide Today:

The 2013 vintage of Cloudy Bay’s international benchmark wine is now available to fine wine lovers worldwide from today Tuesday October 1st. An outstanding summer with excellent growing conditions has enabled Cloudy Bay winemakers to craft New Zealand’s most precious summer flavours into their Sauvignon Blanc 2013 vintage.

Widely regarded as the quintessential expression of the acclaimed Marlborough wine region – which enjoys the longest hours of sunshine of any place in New Zealand, Cloudy Bay’s Sauvignon Blanc is noted for its vibrant aromatics, layers of pure fruit flavours and fine structure. . .


Rural round-up

04/09/2013

Synlait Milk raises forecast milk price for FY2014 season:

Continuing high international commodity prices have seen Synlait Milk increase its forecast milk price for the FY2014 season from $7.00 per kgMS to $8.00 per kgMS.

The Company also lifted its advance rates for the season effective from August paid September from $4.50 per kgMS to $5.00 per kgMS.

Synlait Milk announced last week that it will process more milk than forecast this season following a decision to take a significant allocation of DIRA milk that will increase total production volumes of its ingredients products.

Synlait Milk Managing Director John Penno says the Company remains confident in achieving its forecast financial result for FY2014. . .

Vet becomes farmer with no regrets:

The lives of a qualified veterinarian and a computer science graduate from the Philippines took an unexpected turn when they arrived in New Zealand.

Unable to work in his chosen field in New Zealand unless he took a refresher course, Don Mananes, now lives with

wife Khristine and daughters Denisse (9) and Diane (4), on a dairy farm at Waiparu, near Riversdale, where he works as a farm manager and AI specialist. The family loves the lifestyle, which is different from the city lifestyle they had back home. . .

Mental health still a work in progress:

The Rural Health Alliance Aotearoa New Zealand (RHAANZ) was established in March and ”brings together health, social and political agencies with a rural focus to provide a unified voice and resource to help find solutions for the health problems facing rural communities.”

Southern Rural Life invited chairman Dr Jo Scott-Jones to discuss GPs’ roles in mental health in rural communities.

The role of the rural GP has always been one which has had to provide a wider range of services than in urban centres where there is easier access to support from other providers. . .

Heard it on the grapevine – Kat Pickford:

Fairhall grape grower Stuart Smith has been recognised for services to the country’s wine industry.

New Zealand Winegrowers chairman Steve Green announced Mr Smith’s induction to the roll of fellows at the 29th annual Romeo Bragato conference yesterday.

More than 600 vintners, viticulturists, trades people and suppliers are at the three-day conference being held at the Marlborough Convention Centre this week.

The sell-out event was the industry’s largest, and included the Bragato dinner tonight, when the Moore Stephens Young Viticulturist of the year and the Bragato Wine Award trophy winners would be announced. . .

Land deals first inkling of the future – Kat Pickford:

Tomorrow marks the 40th anniversary of the beginning of Marlborough’s commercial wine industry.

The small group of farmers, lawyers, engineers and orchardists who pioneered viticulture practices to suit the region’s climate talk to reporter Kat Pickford about the journey that led to the phenomenal growth and international success of Marlborough wine.

Blenheim businessman John Marris had his feet up by the fire on a typical Marlborough winter evening in August 1973 when he took a phone call from his boss looking for 200 hectares of bare land on behalf of a mystery buyer.

The freshly minted real estate agent immediately sensed something was up. Rural property was not selling in Marlborough, and he wanted to talk to this guy to find out how serious he was.

In 1973, the value of bare land was about $550 a hectare, and there was not a lot of it on the market. . .

King Country chook lays massive egg – Catley Edwards:

A King Country chook is the toast of the henhouse after laying an egg the size of a mini ostrich egg.

When cracked, the egg revealed its surprise contents – a yolk and another egg.

One of Taumarunui woman Sheryl Standfield’s 12 free-ranging brown highliner hens laid the monster, which weighed in at 165gm, had a girth of 12.7cm and height of 12cm. . .

 


Rural round-up

31/08/2013

Fonterra Leadership to Visit China Next Week:

Fonterra Chairman John Wilson and CEO Theo Spierings will lead a Board of Directors visit to China next week to meet with Fonterra management and key stakeholders.

Mr Wilson said the Co-operative’s Board had already planned to visit China in early September for Directors to meet with Fonterra staff and stakeholders, and view progress on Fonterra’s farming hub in Yutian.

“Now that it has been confirmed that there was no Clostridium botulinum in our whey protein concentrate, we need to address any remaining concerns our stakeholders in China might have. . .

Fonterra’s false alarm shows danger of ‘crying wolf’:

Victoria and Otago Marketing academics provide expert comment on the Fonterra crisis:

Although it is good news that Fonterra received the ‘all clear’ from the Ministry for Primary Industries yesterday, a lot more needs to be done to restore New Zealand’s reputation, say academics from Victoria University of Wellington and the University of Otago.

Dr Hongzhi Gao, Senior Lecturer in Marketing at Victoria Business School and Senior Research Fellow of the New Zealand Contemporary China Research Centre, says the New Zealand government and business communities still have a big job ahead to ensure the official findings filter through to the global market.

“Negativity was so widely spread overseas that a proper public relations campaign needs to be planned and implemented in key dairy export markets, including China. If it is done well, the crisis may be turned into an opportunity for New Zealand’s brand,” says Dr Gao. . .

PGG Wrightson sells Heartland stake for $11.3 million to reduce debt – Tina Morrison

(BusinessDesk) – PGG Wrightson, the rural services company controlled by China’s Agria Corp, sold its stake in Heartland New Zealand for $11.3 million to reduce debt.

Christchurch-based Wrightson sold 13.18 million shares in Heartland, the parent of the country’s newest bank, through a brokerage yesterday at 84 cents a share, a 3.4 percent discount to the 87 cent share price Heartland was trading at immediately prior to the sale. Wrightson acquired the stake as part of the sale of its finance arm to Heartland.

“It wasn’t a strategic holding for us, it’s not our core business,” said company secretary Julian Daly. The stock price “was at a level that we were satisfied with.” . . .

Yashili Granted Consent for Infant Forumla Plant in Pokeno:

Independent commissioner Michael Savage has granted land use consent to Chinese company Yashili NZ Dairy Co Ltd to construct and run a $220 million infant formula plant in Pokeno.

This follows a three day hearing which took place on Wednesday 31 July – Friday 2 August at the Waikato District Council Chambers in Ngaruawahia.

The Council’s Regulatory Committee appointed Michael Savage as the independent Commissioner to hear the application, which received 27 submissions with five submitters heard at the hearing. . .

Synlait Milk will process more milk than forecast in FY14:

Synlait Milk will process more milk than forecast following a decision to take a significant allocation of milk under the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act in the financial year to 31 July 2014.

The decision was made after further planning and a small investment in plant and equipment resulted in an opportunity to increase production capacity of its ingredient products without impacting the forecast infant formula and nutritional products business.

The extra milk will result in an increase to the forecast milk supply and production volumes of its ingredient products as stated in the prospective financial information (“PFI”) of its prospectus issued in June 2013. While early in the season the additional total production provides the Company with increased confidence in achieving its forecast financial result for FY2014. . .

Westland Milk Products joins the ‘good news club’:

Federated Farmers West Coast says New Zealand’s second largest dairy cooperative, Westland Milk Products, has now joined the ‘good news club.’ The cooperative has revised its 2013/14 forecast payout to a range of $7.60-8.00 per kilogram of milk solids (kg/MS), with a new advance rate of $5 kg/MS.

“It has been one hell of an August. I even saw someone at Federated Farmers head office tag it as dairying’s ‘mensis horribilis’,” says Richard Reynolds, Federated Farmers West Coast Dairy chairperson.

“Frankly, West Coast farmers like me are counting down to 20 September when we get the advance. After the rare West Coast drought this year, we’ve got more than an overdraft to start clearing. . .


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