Rural round-up

June 26, 2019

Farmers urged to submit on carbon bill – Pam Tipa:

Both DairyNZ and Beef + Lamb NZ are urging farmers to have their say on the proposed Zero Carbon Bill by July 16.

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says the potential implications of this legislation, in particular the targets for methane reduction, are huge for the agriculture sector.

“That’s why farmer engagement is so important,” he says. He is encouraging dairy farmers to make a submission.

The bill’s full name is the Climate Change Response (Zero Carbon) Amendment Bill. . . 

Kiwi’s quinoa dream now a reality – Andrew Stewart:

A liking for a particular food on a foreign trip is paying dividends for Dan and Jacqui Cottrell and providing extra income for their Taihape farm. They told Andrew Stewart how they discovered quinoa and set about growing it in the central North Island.

Dan and Jacqui Cottrell didn’t realise an overseas adventure would change their lives forever. 

The year was 2012 and the couple were making the most of their South American odyssey when they had an epiphany in Peru. 

They had been eating a lot of quinoa, of which 80% of the global supply is grown in Peru, on their trip.  . . 

 

DIRA changes fall short – farmers – Sudesh Kissun:

Farmers want dairy industry regulations to apply equally to all milk processors in New Zealand.

They still want an end to the open entry/exit provisions of the Dairy Industry Restructuring Act (DIRA) and an end to Fonterra providing subsidised raw milk to rival processors.

However, in proposed DIRA changes the Government has retained the open entry provisions but has allowed Fonterra the right to refuse milk from suppliers who are “not compliant with the co-op rules and from new dairy conversions”. . . 

Small kiwifruit have big taste – Richard Rennie:

Fruit size is providing the headwind to the new kiwifruit season while taste is the tailwind thanks to an exceptional late season ripening period that has left Zespri marketers with a paradigm for foreign markets.

Zespri’s grower alliance manager David Courtney said Green fruit size this season is 2.5 sizes smaller than usual and SunGold two sizes down on usual with the long, dry, ripening period scaling fruit down but pushing up drymatter levels to create exceptionally well flavoured fruit.

“We have had one grower who has been growing kiwifruit for 40 years who said he has never reported better drymatter levels in his crop.” . . 

New Zealand’s most fertile land dug up for housing – Indira Stewart:

Over the last decade more than 200 produce growers in Auckland have closed up shop as more rural land has been rezoned to residential to keep up with the demand for housing.

Now, after 60 years of growing vegetables in South Auckland, celery farmer Stan Clark has decided to close up as well.

Mr Clark’s celery farms were re-zoned from rural to residential in 2009 and the rising land rates are making business unsustainable.

The family is preparing to sell their much-loved farms in Pukekohe, a suburb that holds some of the country’s most fertile land, much of which is being dug up for housing. . . 

Large-scale dairy conversion farm with its own lake-sized reservoir placed on the market for sale:

A large-scale dairy conversion farm – complete with a huge lake-like reservoir –which has seen primary sheep and beef production replaced over the past decade in favour of milking, has been placed on the market for sale.

Strathallan Station some 26-kilometres north-west of Gisborne is a 1,213-hectare property currently milking a herd of 1,000 cows. Towards the centre of the property is a two-and-a-half-metre-deep ‘reservoir’ lake large enough for recreational kayaking and duck hunting. The reservoir sustains not only the farm’s irrigation needs, but also its milk shed requirements. . .


Rural round-up

May 24, 2019

RWNZ leader encourages rural women – Sally Brooker:

Rural women are underpaid and undervalued despite their multiple contributions to their farm, family, home and community, Fiona Gower says.

The national Rural Women New Zealand president spoke in Oamaru this month at a workshop called ”A Leading Voice”. Organised by local Rural Women members, it aimed to help women gain confidence, express themselves, and network with like-minded people.

Ms Gower said women’s input to the farm and household should be recognised by their peers and family.

And women should take the words ”just” and ”only” out of their vocabulary when describing themselves. . .

Feed grain not among good options – Annette Scott:

Good returns for store lambs and strong signals from the milling industry mean arable farmers are opting out of autumn feed grain plantings.

Growers are hunting out their best options and after a good year last year with lambs they are at the top of the priority list for many arable farmers again this year, Federated Farmers grains vice-chairman Brian Leadley said.

The market signals coming from the mills are also encouraging for New Zealand’s drive towards self-sufficiency. . .

Dairy’s top woman backs recycling – Pam Tipa:

Dairy Woman of the Year Trish Rankin has a message for all farmers: recycling systems work and it is worth doing your bit.

“There is a misconception that recycling just gets stockpiled somewhere,” Rankin told Rural News.

“Actually, it doesn’t. Everything that is sent to AgRecovery gets recycled. I think if people knew that they may take the time to triple rinse their containers and take them to their local AgRecovery depot to drop them off to recycle.” . . 

Edible bale wrap developed to reduce farm waste :

Three PhD students have invented an edible bale wrap to reduce farm waste.

The patent-pending BioNet biopolymer was developed specifically for farms to wrap hay and silage.

It is the brainchild of three Imperial College London PhD students: Nick Aristidou, Will Joyce and Stelios Chatzimichail.

The trio came up with the idea after Mr Joyce, who grew up on a farm in Rutland, noticed his parent’s beef herd was creating a lot of wrapping waste. . . 

2018/19 season results: Zespri operating revenue exceeds $3 billion:

Zespri’s returns to growers and the industry reached new levels on the back of strong growth in both volume and value and across all fruit categories last season, with operating revenue from global kiwifruit sales and licence release revenue exceeding $3 billion for the first time.

The results reflect continued strong international demand, with Zespri selling a total of 167.2 million trays of kiwifruit in 2018/19, a 21 percent increase on the 138.6 million trays sold in the previous season. Revenue generated by global kiwifruit sales and SunGold licence release increased by 26 percent to $3.14 billion. . .

A recollection – Adolf Fiinkensein:

When Adolf graduated from Lincoln as a valuer and farm consultant he went off to Australia and, by accident, fell into commerce where he remained for forty or so years.  Many of my colleagues had come over and introduced Canterbury farming techniques.  Some did very well, others not so well

I well remember a crusty old West Australian wheat cocky remarking that ‘those bastards charged us a fee for telling us when we would go broke. . . 

 

 


Rural round-up

October 23, 2017

Red meat halves risk of depression:

Women who reduce lamb and beef in their diets are more likely to suffer depression, according to the new study.

Experts admitted surprise at the findings because so many other studies have linked red meat to physical health risks.

The team made the link after a study of 1000 Australian women.
Professor Felice Jacka, who led the research by Deakin University, Victoria, said: “We had originally thought that red meat might not be good for mental health but it turns out that it actually may be quite important. . . 

Tech means go slow to speed up – Richard Rennie:

A warts and all insight to precision agriculture’s impact on those at the sharp end includes frustrations over data quantities it generate but also the rewards of sticking with it and saving significant sums along the way.

At this year’s precision agriculture conference in Hamilton delegates had the chance to learn about hands-on farmer experiences with the many different versions of the technology and pick up some lessons on how to get the most from it. . .

Farmers should benefit from calls for greater transparency around food production – Gerald Piddock:

Consumer demands for more transparency in food production are expected to bring greater rewards for New Zealand farmers demonstrating good environmental stewardship.

The push for more transparency came from a growing interest in how food was produced, Ministry for Primary Industries’ director general Martyn Dunne told delegates at the International Tri-Conference for Precision Agriculture in Hamilton on October 16. . .

Concern for farmers involved in outbreak – Sally Rae:

South Canterbury Rural Support Trust trustee Sarah Barr says she is very concerned for the farmers involved with the Mycoplasma bovis outbreak, describing it as an “excruciating experience” for them.

Mrs Barr, who has been working closely with the farmers, urged the community to support them.

“Keep in mind how terrible it is for these guys losing their animals,” she told about 50 people attending a public meeting in Waimate this week.

Ministry for Primary Industries technical liaison officer Victoria Barrell said Mycoplasma bovis was a “terrible disease“. . .

NAIT disease response fell short – Annette Scott:

National Animal Identification and Tracing fell short of expectation in the cattle disease Mycoplasma bovis response, Ministry for Primary Industries readiness and response director Geoff Gwyn says.

He told a farmer meeting in Waimate on Thursday that NAIT animal declaration had played a key part in the response.

“But we have learnt a lot. It has fallen short of expectation, been disappointing,” Gwyn said.

“If this had been a fast moving disease we could well be in a different situation. . . 

Orchard buyers set new kiwifruit gold standard as Zespri expands plantings – Gerard Hutching:

Prices for kiwifruit orchards have hit new highs, with a handful of sales this week in Bay of Plenty over the $1 million per hectare mark.

Stan Robb of PGG Wrightson Real Estate in Te Puke said properties were in such demand they were snapped up in days.

In June the region was abuzz with news of the first orchards to break through the $1m per ha ceiling. Those orchards had a full crop on them, so the new owners could make an immediate income, unlike the recent ones. . .


Rural round-up

October 20, 2017

Growing a better world together:

Rabobank is proud to announce Kickstart Food: a three-year programme to kick-start the transition to a more sustainable food and agricultural sector.

With our knowledge, networks and financial solutions, over the next three years we will intensify our efforts to help our clients and partners develop and scale innovations across the food value chain: from farm to fork.

Together we will change the way we grow, distribute and eat our food in order to nourish everyone while respecting planetary boundaries and allowing agricultural businesses to make a decent living.

Food & agriculture sector under pressure
The world’s population is growing. Rapidly. By 2050 we will have two billion more mouths to feed. And because we are living longer and getting wealthier each of us will want and need more to eat. A lot more. . .

Synlait’s Best Practice Dairy Farming Programme Endorsed By Regional Council:

Synlait Milk’s  Lead With Pride™ programme is the first independent programme in the New Zealand agricultural industry to become an approved audit management system.

Lead With Pride™ is the first of its kind in Australasia, and encourages best practice dairy farming.

“It is our flagship programme. It puts into action the things that really matter to us by partnering with our milk suppliers to use best practice to look after animals, protect the environment and care for people on farm. Of course it also focuses on food safety and the quality of the milk our suppliers produce,” says John Penno, Synlait’s Managing Director and CEO. . .

Enhancing the ecology priority for generations of Kilmog farming family – Sally Rae:

Generations of the Scott family, from Waikouaiti, have invested heavily in preserving and enhancing the ecology of their land.
But as Nick and Steph Scott see it, they are no different from most farmers in New Zealand.

‘‘We run a land-based business that needs to generate an economic return but, at the same time, we are aware of our environmental responsibilities and have a genuine attachment to the land that, in my view, is far greater than that of many of our urban counterparts,’’ Mr Scott said . .

Zespri lifts forecast for 2018 tray returns, boosts SunGold licence allocations:

Zespri Group, the country’s statutory kiwifruit exporter, raised its forecast for tray returns across all varieties in the 2018 financial year and is accelerating licensing for its SunGold fruit on growing demand for the sweeter variety.

The Mount Manganui-based company forecasts total fruit and service payment to be $1.39 billion in the year ending March 31, up from a previous forecast of $1.34b, with the board signing off on higher returns to growers, it said in a statement.

Zespri paid $1.39b to growers in 2017 due to a steep increase in supply. . . 

Dairy analyst thriving on challenges of the job – Sally Rae:

In a nutshell, Emma Higgins describes her job as a communicator of dairy information.

Ms Higgins is a dairy analyst for Rabobank, a role she described as being ‘‘absolutely fantastic’’.

Originally from a small sheep and beef property near Nelson, she studied law at Canterbury University, convinced she was going to be a lawyer . . 

Fear can never feed the world – Rob Fraley:

In 1934, a college student in Minnesota was studying for finals when his throat started to hurt. Then he developed a high fever. When it became hard to even swallow, he went to the hospital and received a devastating diagnosis: strep throat.

At that time, there was no treatment. The hospital intern was so sure the boy would die that he asked if he could cut out his lymph nodes for a research project – in front of the patient!

Fortunately, the patient pulled through, escaping the horrific strep-induced death that his wrestling teammate experienced shortly after he recovered.

So what does this story have to do with agriculture? . .


Rural round-up

April 6, 2017

Good trade news for red meat – let’s hope it happens quickly – Allan Barber:

The visit by Chinese Premier Li Kequiang has been very positive in several ways for New Zealand’s trade agreements, except for those people who are anti free trade or closer engagement with China (Winston Peters?). After the excitement about the announcement in April last year during the John Key led trade mission, progress on chilled red meat access to China and an upgraded FTA appeared to have gone onto the back burner, until now.

Progress was always going to be slower than the optimistic predictions, because nothing like this happens quickly without extensive discussions between officials about technical issues and, in the case of chilled meat, rewritten protocols and plant certification. Another issue to resolve was the need for marketing and distribution relationships to be established with particular emphasis on the cool chain. . . 

Dairy farmers committed to lowering environmental impact – Katrina Knowles:

Taranaki dairy farmers have planted native species along 5760 kilometres of waterways on their farms. This is the equivalent to a journey from Cape Reinga to Bluff, and back to the steps of Parliament in Wellington, with a few plants to spare.

Dairy farmers, not just in Taranaki, but also throughout the country, are committed to lowering the environmental impact of dairying, while protecting the valuable contribution they make to the economy.

Dairy farming is a major driver in the New Zealand economy, improving everyone’s lifestyle in this country. This is both directly and indirectly, and in rural and urban communities. . . 

Feedback big part of dairy awards – Sally Rae:

Entering the Southland-Otago Dairy Industry Awards was not about winning for Clydevale sharemilkers Russell and Tracy Bouma.

Rather, it was an opportunity to get feedback from judges to help them grow their business, Mr Bouma said.

The couple recently won the Sharefarmer of the Year title at the regional awards function in Invercargill, collecting $20,065 in prizes.

They sharemilk 762 cows on Andrew, Owen and Barbara Johnston’s 270ha farm and it was the fourth time they had entered the awards. They have been sharemilking since 2002.

Every time they had entered, they had been able to implement some of the feedback from the judges, Mrs Bouma (37) said. . . 

Protecting vulnerable native species with 1080 gets results:

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says successful breeding results for several of our most vulnerable native birds come as a result of using 1080 to kill predators.

“New results from a five-year study of South Island kākā nesting at Lake Paringa in South Westland show 30 times as many kākā chicks were produced and survived in the area after 1080 treatment to control stoats and possums compared to the area where no 1080 was used,” Ms Barry says.

“Put another way – 55% of kākā nests were successful up to a year after 1080 treatment but only 1.75% were successful where the compound was not used. 97% of adult kākā survived in 1080 treated areas.” . . 

Zespri reports strong interest in bidding round for Gold3 licenses – Rebecca Howard:

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri International reported strong interest in a bidding round for 400 hectares of new Gold3 or SunGold variety kiwifruit licences and said its shares will resume trading on Friday.

The kiwifruit marketer said it received 938 bids of which 235 were successful, and will reap $98 million of revenue from the allocation, excluding GST. The average size of the successful bids was 1.7 hectares. The SunGold variety has proven popular as it is more resistant to the Pseudomonas syringae pv actinadiae bacteria, better known as PSA, which decimated the industry some six years ago. By the end of June 2012, more than 35 percent of New Zealand kiwifruit orchards were infected. SunGold, first commercialised in 2010, was key to the sector’s recovery. . . 

Ashburton dairy farmer takes the helm at Canterbury A&P:

Dairy farmer Peter Gilbert was elected as President of the Canterbury Agricultural and Pastoral Association for 2017 at the Annual General Meeting held at Riccarton Park Racecourse on 29 March.

Based in Winchmore, near Ashburton, Mr Gilbert was confirmed as the President of the 155th Canterbury A&P Show in front of outgoing President Warrick James, the General Committee and Association Members.

Mr Gilbert said he was looking forward to his Presidential year after a long association with Canterbury A&P. . . 

Anmum Releases Its First Batch of QR Coded Cans in NZ:

Parents Can Trace Product Journey as Anmum Releases Its First Batch of QR Coded Cans in NZ

Consumers now have their first touch point with Fonterra’s traceability in New Zealand through QR codes on Fonterra’s paediatric range, Anmum.

The QR codes are part of a programme to track and trace ingredients and products electronically throughout Fonterra, from the raw milk source on farm right through to retailers who sell the product to consumers.

Unique for every Anmum can, the QR code connects consumers via a mobile phone app to a webpage with information which verifies the authenticity of the product and its batch number. Consumers can also scan the can at any stage after they have bought it and get up to date status information about their product. . . .

Positive outlook for forestry sector:

Associate Primary Industries Minister Louise Upston has welcomed new forecasts showing forestry export revenue set to rise further over the next two financial years.

The Ministry for Primary Industries’ first quarterly update of its Situation Outlook for Primary Industries shows forestry export revenue is forecast to rise 5.8 per cent to $5.4 billion for the year ending June 2017, and a further 8.8 per cent to $5.9 billion in the year to June 2018.

“Rising log exports are behind this positive forecast, with a strong demand from China due to its expanding housing market. This, combined with low shipping costs, has driven harvesting to record levels,” Ms Upston says. . . 

Rabobank’s dairy analyst Emma Higgins on today’s GDT Event result:

The spread in pricing between fats and proteins are at record levels. AMF lifted 2.5% to USD 5,936/tonne (the highest average price for AMF in GDT history) and although butter lost ground by 1.6%, the average price at USD 4,751 is still the second highest average price in the history of butter offerings on GDT. Given low SMP pricing dynamics, coupled with lower global milk production, low fat stocks are underpinning outstanding fat prices.

Looking at the powder front, WMP prices lifted a modest 2.4% to USD 2,924 /tonne. Some price support has come from lower auction volumes this time around, with 20% less on offer overnight compared to the last auction. While SMP moved a fraction lower (-0.8%) to USD 1,913/tonne, a sizable 50% increase in SMP offer volumes makes the result overnight seem very positive indeed. . .

Farmers to see changes to farmhouse deductibility:

With farmers spending an increasing amount of time in the office, or at the kitchen table as the case is for many farmers across New Zealand, the changes to the deductibility of farmhouse expenses may come as a surprise. “With changes impacting farmers for the 2017/2018 financial year, it is important they take the time to find out how the changes could affect them,” Tony Marshall, Agribusiness Tax Specialist for Crowe Horwath points out.

Since the 1960s the IRD has allowed full-time farmers a deduction of 25% of farmhouse expenses without any evidentiary support. Inland Revenue Group Tax Counsel Graham Tubb says that this has allowed some farmers to claim deductions for private spending. . . 

Anchor Food Professionals Opens Sri Lanka’s First Dairy Innovation Kitchen:

Sri Lanka’s foodies are set to receive a delicious boost to their out-of-home dining experience, with Fonterra’s opening of the country’s first dairy innovation kitchen for the foodservice industry.

With increased urbanisation and more Sri Lankans eating out of home, Colombo, a city with more than two million people, is seeing new international hotel chains, restaurants, bakeries and other food outlets spring up around the city.

To cater to the growing interest in out-of-home dining, Fonterra’s foodservice business, Anchor Food Professionals, has opened an innovation kitchen in the city to trial new dairy products and work with chefs to develop new recipes and flavours that suit the tastes of Sri Lankan consumers. . . 

Carrfields seeds produce second world record grain crop:

 An Ashburton farmer’s record-breaking wheat crop is the second world record grain yield to be produced from Carrfields seeds in two years.

Eric Watson’s February 2017 harvest of 16.8 tonnes a hectare, grown from Carrfields’ winter wheat variety Oakley, has just made the Guinness World Records list for highest wheat yield.

It follows the world record for the highest yielding barley crop, set by Timaru growers Warren and Joy Darling in January 2015. The Darlings broke the previous 25-year-old record with a yield of 13.8 tonnes a hectare from Carrfields’ variety 776.

Carrfields’ Cereal Seed Product Manager, Phil Smith, said he was thrilled to see two world records set in Canterbury in a short space of time. . . 


Rural round-up

March 18, 2016

Research is critical to future prosperity – Allan Barber:

By the time most of you read this, I will have delivered an address to a Meat Industry Research workshop at Ruakura. Preparation for this has severely taxed my knowledge of research directed at the future prosperity of the red meat sector. Depending on the reaction to my presentation, I will almost certainly find out whether or not I have succeeded in talking sense and, more important, introducing some relevant fresh ideas to the audience of scientists and people with infinitely greater technical credentials than I.

The workshop’s themes are added value, value from quality, and provenance and food assurance which neatly encapsulate what the meat industry needs to provide the consumers of the world and extract from the market. Research output will obviously have to contribute new developments to this, as the industry cannot find its place in the sun by continuing to do what it has been doing to date. . . 

K5 “could prove effective rabbit killer

A new weapon in the war on rabbits could be introduced into New Zealand next autumn.

The RHDV1-K5 virus is a Korean strain of the lethal calcivirus already present in New Zealand that causes rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD).

Leader of Landcare Research’s rabbit biocontrol initiative Dr Janine Duckworth said yesterday the new strain of virus could help New Zealand farmers slash rabbit numbers by up to 30%.

Landcare Research and the New Zealand Rabbit Co-ordination Group are seeking approval from the Ministry for Primary Industries and the Environment Protection Authority to introduce the ‘‘K5” virus. . . 

The kiwi behind Northland’s biggest dairy farmer – Peter de Graaf:

The man who became Northland’s biggest dairy farmer puts his success down to the skills he gained helping on his father’s farm as a child.

Merv Pinny and his wife Cara sold their 10 Mangakahia Rd farms to the Spencer family on February 29, for an undisclosed sum, thought to be around $40 million, after an initial sale last year to a Chinese firm fell through.

Mr Pinny, 56, grew up on the family dairy farm at Te Aroha. . . 

Anthony Alexander Sinclair (Tony) Trotter: 1924 – 2016 – Chris Trotter:

TONY TROTTER – “Mr Country Calendar” – died today (Wednesday, 9 March 2016) aged 91, from natural causes.

As the television broadcaster who chose its distinctive theme music, and moved the programme out of the studio and “into the field”, Tony shapedCountry Calendar into the nation’s most beloved television series. The iconic programme, celebrating every aspect of rural life, is still being produced, and this year celebrated its own fiftieth anniversary.

Tony’s later work included the ground-breaking Natural World of the Maori, with Tipene O’Reagan, and the quirky A Dog’s Show – which turned the obscure country sport of sheep-dog trialling into a popular television show. Tony ended his broadcasting career in 1989 as the Executive Producer of Television New Zealand’s award-winning Natural History Unit in Dunedin. . . 

For Dad (a poem) – Chris Trotter:

Wheeling gulls enfold the tractor

like feathered confetti.

My father, head half-turned,

To keep the furrow straight,

Is dwarfed by the immensity

Of the paddock he has ploughed.

To my child’s eye,

The birds’ raucous accolade

Is well-deserved:     . . 

Zespri announces more SunGold licence at start of 2016 kiwifruit season:

At the start of what is set to be a record-breaking 2016 season, Zespri is positioning itself for the future by announcing the release of a further 400 hectares of its gold kiwifruit variety SunGold this year.

In making the decision to release the additional licence this year, the Zespri Board signalled that – dependant on the product’s performance and future global demand – an additional 400 hectares of SunGold licence will also be released each year in 2017, 2018 and 2019.

Zespri Chairman Peter McBride said releasing more SunGold hectares was tremendously exciting for the industry and the decision had been made in response to overwhelming global demand for the variety. . . 

Geographical indications law a step closer for New Zealand wine and spirit makers:

A proposed new law that will enable wine and spirit makers to register the geographical origins of their products is a step closer says Commerce and Consumer Affairs Minister Paul Goldsmith.

The Geographical Indications (Wines and Spirits) Amendment Bill was debated for the first time today and will now go through the select committee process, including public submissions.

The Bill amends the Geographical Indications (Wines and Spirits) Registration Act which was passed in 2006 but never brought into force. . . 

Key Issues Addressed at Winds of Change Agri-Conference:

Over 130 of Australasia’s leading agribusiness professionals will gather in Wellington on Monday (21st) for the annual Platinum Primary Producers (PPP) Conference.

Challenged with discussing the ‘winds of change’ currently sweeping across the farming landscapes of New Zealand and Australasia, delegates will hear from keynote speakers including Steven Carden, CEO of Landcorp Farming Ltd, Paul Morgan, Chairman of Wakatu Incorporation, Prof. Jacqueline Rowarth from the University of Waikato, James Parsons, Chairman of Beef + Lamb NZ, Doug Avery, Malborough farmer, and Scottie Chapman, CEO of Spring Sheep Dairy Ltd.

Agenda topics will include exporting and new markets, innovations in sheep milk, changing demands for food and nutrition, encouraging young people into agriculture, farm tourism and connecting rural and urban communities. . . 

International Agri-Leaders Visit Wairarapa Showcase Farms

Pirinoa School Set to Receive Funds:

Over 130 of Australasia’s leading agribusiness professionals will visit two farms in Pirinoa, South Wairarapa, next week (Wednesday 23rd March), as part of the annual Platinum Primary Producers (PPP) ‘Capital Connections; winds of change’ Conference.

The delegation, which includes well-known industry leaders and commentators such as Steven Carden, CEO of Landcorp Farming Ltd, Prof. Jacqueline Rowarth from the University of Waikato, Malborough farmer, Doug Avery, and James Parsons, Chairman of Beef + Lamb NZ, will spend time at the Warren family’s Romney stud, Turanganui, and the Weatherstone family’s dairy farm, Rotopai. . . 

Farm dog ‘a hero and a honey’ – Brooke Hobson and Thomas Mead:

Heroes come in all shapes and sizes, including ones with four paws — like Lilly the farm dog who got burnt in a fire.

Lilly suffered burns to all four paws and parts of her body after a fire got out of control at Sharedale farm near Timaru.

Farm manager Darcy Tong says a four-week-old fire reignited in a block of trees last week.

“I was at home and went back up to check on it and [the fire] was out of control,” he says. . . 

Farmers spray hundreds of litres of milk in protest in Brussels – Amy Forde:

Farmers from across Europe were protesting today in Brussels as EU Agriculture Ministers met to try and come up with solutions to the ongoing crises in the dairy and pigmeat sectors.

The video below shows one farmer with a churn on his head spraying European Parliament buildings with milk. 

Low prices across all farming sectors and the Russian ban were what they were protesting over. . . 

Cowsmopolitan Dairy Magazine's photo.

Cervus Equipment Manawatu opens new Feilding branch:

Leading John Deere dealership Cervus Equipment Manawatu has formally opened its brand-new, purpose-built branch in Feilding.

Following seven years of local sales, service and support, Branch Manager Dan Clavelle says the new Feilding branch will enable Cervus Equipment Manawatu to continue and expand its local operations.

“Cervus Equipment Manawatu is committed to adding value to our customer’s businesses every day,” Mr Clavelle said. . . 


Rural round-up

August 12, 2015

Corker porker stalkers thwarted – Mark Price:

Hunters tempted to ”farm” wild deer or pigs before hunting competitions are likely to be out of luck at the Upper Clutha Deerstalkers Association competition later this month.

The association, which is holding its popular annual competition for the third time, has changed its rules, mainly to encourage more interest in hunting among women and children.

But the changes also aim to sideline hunters who manipulate the competition process by allowing wild deer or pigs to graze crops on farmland over the winter. . .

Ambitious project still growing – Lynda van Kempen:

An international curling rink in Naseby? It seemed a lofty goal more than 15 years ago, but a decade on from its opening the facility is still going strong and exceeding all expectations.

”People seeing it for the first time tend to be a bit bemused at finding a facility of this standard in the middle of what they call nowhere – but what we call the centre of the universe,” Maniototo Curling International (MCI) rink manager Ewan Kirk says. . .

US beef cow repopulation – the rebuild begins:

After the drought-induced decline in the US beef cow herd in recent years, the industry is making a mends and rebuilding its depleted numbers, with expectations to grow by more than three million head in the next three-to-five years.

With around 50 per cent of New Zealand’s beef exports destined for the US, the rebuilding of the US cow herd may impact the strong demand for Kiwi beef seen in recent years, according to Rabobank. . .

Zespri opens Singapore office:

Prime Minister John Key has officially opened Zespri’s new sales and marketing hub in Singapore, which has been set up to manage the kiwifruit industry’s growth.

Zespri chair Peter McBride says it was an honour to have the Prime Minister open the new office.

“Volumes of Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit are set to grow strongly in the next few years and Zespri is investing in its market capability to deliver this growth for New Zealand growers,” he says. . .

The Internet of Stings: WiFi for your beehive:

New Zealand based beekeeping technology company, Hivemind Ltd, have released a new WiFi beehive scale and smartphone app that will allow urban beekeepers, bee educators and researchers, to better monitor their bees and more easily share their knowledge about these vitally important pollinators. A crowdfunding campaign for the product is currently live on the indiegogo platform here: www.indiegogo.com/at/wifibees

The importance of bees in our environment is a highly topical and important issue gaining increasing coverage. Beekeeper and hive numbers are continuing to increase in New Zealand with over 5000 registered in 2014.  . .

 

Game on for children to raise farm safety awareness:

A new free online farm safety game that children can play on smartphones, computers and tablets is the latest innovation in the quest to improve farm safety.

Industry body DairyNZ’s cowbassador, Rosie the Cow, has teamed up with WorkSafe and ACC to create Farm Rules!, an engaging way for primary school children to learn about the risks involved with certain farm activities and how to minimise or avoid them. . .

You can download the game here.

 


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