Rural round-up

February 13, 2017

Johnny Kirkpatrick wins World Shearing Championships title – Brittany Pickett:

Napier shearer Johnny Kirkpatrick has finally won the elusive world machine shearing title.

The World Shearing and Woolhandling Championships were on at ILT Stadium Southland in Invercargill on Saturday night..

The 46-year-old had competed at the world championships three times prior to this year’s competition and said it was a hard final. . . 

Farm growth relies on good staff – Richard Rennie:

Rural employment specialist John Fegan has seen big changes in his time in the industry but yet issues he tried to address 20 years ago have still not been fundamentally fixed. While recruiting staff he also spent much time educating farmers and encouraging them to treat staff well. Richard Rennie spoke to him before his semi-retirement.

HE SPENT time in his youth skiing southern slopes as a self-confessed adrenaline junkie but John Fegan’s career was more about avoiding the cliffs and crevasses that accompany employing farm staff.

Zespri to license more SunGold kiwifruit in Italy to meet rising demand – Rebecca Howard

(BusinessDesk) – Zespri International, New Zealand’s kiwifruit marketer, it will licence more production of its SunGold variety in Italy to meet rising demand and ensure 12-month supply.

The Tauranga-based company today said it will allocate an additional 1,800 hectares of European SunGold licence over the next three years. The first 1,200 will be in Italy and the remaining 600 hectares are still to be allocated.

Zespri chief operating officer Simon Limmer said the move is driven by growing year-round demand for Zespri kiwifruit. It has established supply in several northern hemisphere countries, particularly Italy and France, to ensure supply when New Zealand kiwifruit is not available. It currently exports and markets premium New Zealand kiwifruit to 56 countries around the world. . . 

New Zealand Winegrowers releases first Sustainability Report:

New Zealand Winegrowers has released the first ever report on the wine sector’s achievements in sustainability. The Report presents data collected from vineyard and winery members of Sustainable Winegrowing New Zealand – one of the first and world-leading sustainability programmes in the international wine sector.

The Sustainability Report highlights actions undertaken by the wine industry such as enhancing biodiversity, reducing and recycling by-products, optimising water and energy use, investing in people, protecting soil, and reducing agrichemical use. . . 

Shifting climate and Sauvignon blanc style – Can you taste the future?  – Dr Glen Creasy:

Wine is a fascinating beverage. It is the culmination of a myriad of effects on the grapevine and its fruit, decisions made by the winemaker, handling of the bottles and the time until it’s poured into your glass. It is an expression of the environment it was made in, and so therefore as the environment changes, so must the wine.

My career has focussed on how to improve the way we grow grapes so that they can be made into better wine, and more recently, how factors relating to climate change alter the way grapevines grow and subsequently, how the wine smells and tastes. The factors I’m most interested in are increases in temperature and changes in rainfall patterns, because these have a large impact on grapevines and the wine made from their fruit. . . 

The truth about coming back to the farm –  What young farmers are dying for you to know.Uptown Farms:

I just wrapped up a week of being on the road, talking with young farmers throughout the Midwest. I had committed to speaking at three different events this week, all of which catered to young farmers.

During my presentations , I shared with them the questions that consumers share with me, and tips for how they can tell their own farm story.

Without fail, this presentation evokes passion and sparks conversation among farmers, but even more noticeably among young farmers.

This week there were some very clear themes that emerged – realities of farming that our young farmers are dying for you to know. . . 

Little Brick Pastoral tells agriculture story with lego – Jennifer King:

A tiny plastic farmer wearing a wide-brimmed hat and green overalls is doing his bit to raise awareness of Australian agriculture.

He is the Lego Farmer, 4.5cm tall and becoming quite a national, if not international, celebrity as he sows the message of agriculture in schools and via social media.

The farmer spends his day working hard, fixing machinery, baling hay, checking the harvest, planting crops or hanging out with his working dog. . .

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Rural round-up

April 13, 2016

Plan for the worst, hope for the best – Jackie Harrigan:

If you could bottle optimism and cheerfulness and spray it around, Ben and Belinda Price would be a great source.

The Taranaki Dairy Industry Awards Share Farmers of the Year for 2016 could be forgiven for feeling a little down, with their feed wedge flatlining on their Waitotara sharemilking farm after a hot dry summer and the Fonterra payout forecast dipping to new lows.

But the indomitable pair have picked up many skills in their eight years of sharemilking and they put optimism and healthy thinking at the top of their list of useful habits, followed closely by budget monitoring and giving back. . .

Three years of low payouts for dairy farmers will build pressure – Jill Galloway:

Farmers are dealing with tough times.

Rabobank Feilding branch manager Asti Williamson said 99 per cent of dairy farmers were likely to survive the three-year milk payout downturn.

“Each case is different. It depends how much debt a farm has.  But we are supporting our farmers.”

He said bank economists thought New Zealand was about halfway through the payout downturn.

“And the impact of the low payout is on the banks, farmers and the whole country.” . . 

 

The hunt for the golden kiwifruit – Julian Lee:

Scientists in Te Puke are concocting bizarre and wonderful new types of kiwifruit.

The kiwifruit industry will bring in $1 billion next year, and scientists are on the hunt for the next golden kiwifruit.

The SunGold kiwifruit was developed in New Zealand in the 1990s but has its origins in China. It’s now a popular variety, both domestically and for export.

Zespri and Plant and Land Research are looking to replicate that success. . . .

NZ lamb angers British farmers after imports sold under Prince Charles’ label :

British farmers are dismayed to find New Zealand lamb being sold under Prince Charles’ brand Duchy Originals, which was meant to promote the best of British produce.

Duchy Originals products are sold only at UK supermarket Waitrose, which confirmed it does sell imported lamb under the Duchy brand when supplies from British farms were not available, the Daily Mail reported.

Welsh sheep farmer Gethin Havard said New Zealand lamb was ‘over-fat and over-priced’ compared with Welsh lamb. . . 

Fonterra board size in focus in first governance overhaul since inception –  Jonathan Underhill:

(BusinessDesk) – Fonterra’s board and shareholders’ council successfully opposed a remit to shrink its board at last year’s annual meeting and the outcome of this week’s first-ever governance overhaul may hold that line while proposing other changes to ensure the best spread of boardroom skills.

New Zealand’s biggest exporter is scheduled to release a set of proposals to refresh its governance structures – both at board and shareholders’ council level – on Thursday, with the aim of putting any proposed changes to its structure before shareholders for a vote in May. Auckland-based Fonterra hasn’t changed its governance and representation arrangements since being set up 15 years ago although it undertook a full review in 2013. . .

NZ Wine Industry Embraces Automation –WineWorks and Sacred Hill lead the way with supply chain integration:

WineWorks, Sacred Hill, and Flow Software have taken a significant step towards integrating the New Zealand wine industry supply chain.

The organisations have just gone live with a new automated process that allows efficient management of the wine to bottling, warehousing, and distribution of Sacred Hill wine via WineWorks.

“We identified that if we could send our sales orders via EDI to WineWorks this would reduce administration processing costs, negate duplicate rekeying of orders, remove error input rates, eliminate stock from being allocated if not available and allow for more orders to be sent to WineWorks. ” says Cameron Sutton, Production Manager of Sacred Hill. “Flow worked closely with our specialist ERP provider UXC Eclipse, which was fundamental to the success of the project”, notes Sutton. . .


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