Rural round-up

15/12/2020

Scientists press to put ‘regenerative farming’ to the test – Sally Rae:

A call for proposals for projects that will investigate regenerative farming practices “can’t happen soon enough”, New Zealand Institute of Agricultural and Horticultural Science president Jon Hickford says.

In a strongly worded statement, the NZIAHS said it was “concerned about the dearth of sound science underpinning the hype surrounding regenerative agriculture”.

The organisation had published a series of articles from scientists from different disciplines in this month’s issue of its online AgScience magazine which showed regenerative agriculture was “more hype than reality”, it said.

MPI said there was increasing interest from farmers and the wider community about regenerative agricultural practices. . . 

Fonterra, Nestlé and DairyNZ join forces to tackle nitrogen leaching:

Fonterra and Nestlé are teaming up with DairyNZ to expand a promising plantain trial to help improve waterways and reduce on-farm greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Incorporating certain varieties of plantain into a cow’s diet has been shown to reduce the nitrogen concentration in their urine, which can leach through soil into groundwater.

To test the benefits in local pastures, DairyNZ has been leading the Tararua Plantain Project in the lower North Island, where farmers have been growing the leafy herb for their cows. The Ministry for Primary Industries is also involved as a key contributor. . .

Rams key to breeding top lambs – David Hill:

North Canterbury rams are the secret to breeding mint condition lambs, according to Marlborough farmers Ali and Stu Campbell.

The Marlborough father and son duo paid tribute to their ram breeders, Chris and Jane Earl, of Scargill in North Canterbury, after being announced as the winners of the Canterbury A&P Association mint lamb competition on Friday.

“It’s nice to give some recognition to Marlborough, but we couldn’t do it without our ram breeder,” Stu Campbell said.

“Chris and Jane look after us well and we appreciate what they do for us. . . 

My challenge to you – Anna Campbell:

For as long as I have been involved in agriculture, our industry has lamented our poor image and the fact that we struggle to attract young people.

I have heard people say we need a rebrand, agriculture is a term which brings to mind a lack of sophistication. In the game of cricket, an “agricultural batsman” is someone who dispatches the ball to “cow corner” in a rather basic manner!

Suggesting an agricultural career to a youngster will not automatically make them think about producing the finest food in the world, advanced genetics, machine learning, international food chains, global food security, financial modelling or GIS mapping. Yet, those of us in the industry understand agriculture encompasses all of that and so much more.

Various government and industry initiatives have produced scholarships for students and held open days to attract youngsters. This has helped, but we need more – we face an aging workforce, challenges in world food supply systems and a growing rural-urban divide. It will take a commitment from all agriculturalists to turn the tide – what might that commitment look like? . .

Shepherding when I’m 64 – Paul Brut:

I’m 64 and my heading dog is 63. We were watching a ewe standing awkwardly on a steep face above a dirty gully. She was trying to lamb but with only one foot showing I doubted she would cope on her own.

We needed to catch her. At 64 you can’t just do it, you need a plan. A shepherd’s crook is essential but I had temporarily misplaced mine… agility isn’t the only thing that deserts you at 64.

There was a whiff on the cool October breeze, at least about me, and I remembered where I had left the crook. Earlier that morning I had lambed a hogget with lambs that had been long dead inside her. That must be one of the most unpleasant jobs of shepherding as the state of decomposition meant the second lamb didn’t come out whole.

The extreme thing, apart from the smell is that that hogget will most likely survive. It’s a marvel that a mammal’s physiology can contain that level of infection and not let the body succumb. . .

Farmers could be ‘unintended victims’ of Wealth Tax plan:

Struggling farming businesses could be unintended victims of the recently proposed Wealth Tax plan, NFU Mutual has warned.

The Wealth Tax Commission issued its report this week, proposing a one percent tax for the next five years on individual wealth over £500,000.

The pandemic has placed a significant strain on the UK economy, and the government is exploring a number of different revenue-raising options.

The proposed tax would apply to all wealth, including homes and other property such as farms, pensions, as well as business wealth. . . 


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